(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Catalog of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 1896-1899, 1900-1903"

• ss 



y i 



START OF 

ROLL 



\ 



/ 



*>u 



-J 



X 




r 



V 



•■p 



DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY 

MICROFORM 

TEST TARGET 




10 mm (e= 81 mm) 



ABCDEFGHIJKIMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ1 234567890 
abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz$«£/%# l /2 , /4% — =+x&@ 



1.5 mm (e= 1.09 mm) 

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ1 234567890 
abcdefghi|klmnopqrstuvwxyz$<t£/%# 1 /2 , /4 3 /4— =+x&@* 



.0 



.0 m|ii (e= 



1.37 mm) 



ABCDEFGHIJI^MNOPQRSTUVWXYZ 

abcdef§1iijklmnopqrstuvwxyz'" 
1234567890$<r£/%# 1 /2 1 /4 3/4— =+x&@* # 



' 2.5 mm (e= 1.77 mm) 

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ 

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 
1234567890$<t£/%#!A 1 /4%— =+x&@ 



I.I 



1.25 



m 


| 2.8 


1 25 






1 5.0 ' ' 




III 




jlll 32 


III 21 


I 6.3 

£ m 


III 


18.0 

JJ 1 IB 4.0 


II 2.0 


«- ' 1 


ii ■ 


14 u 


ULL 


1 


1.8 


II 




1.4 


III 


1.6 



1.0 mm (e= .81 mm) 



ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ1 234567890 
abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz$a£/%#'/2 1 /4 : >/4— =+x&@* 



1.5 mm (e= 1.09 mm) 

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ 1 234567890 
abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz$<t£/%#V2'/4 3 /4— =+x&@* 



2.0 mm (e= 1.37 mm) 

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ 

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 
1234567890$<t£/%# 1 /2 1 /4 3/ 4 — ±+x&@* 



2.5 mm (e= 1.77 mm) 

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ 

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 
1 234567890$ct£/%#y2 VaVa— =+ x&@ 




LAAh. 



^^^^^mm^^m^^m^mtmmmmtm 



m *^ mmt ^im*L*M a M 



MICROFILMED 1 997 



Auburn University Libraries 

Auburn^ AL 36849 



USAIN State and Local 
Literature Preservation Project 

Alabama 



Ralph Brown Draughon 




Funded in part by the 

National Endowment for the 

Humanities 

Reproductions may not be made without permission from 

the Ralph Brown Draughon Library 



If 



1 



Catalogue of the Alabama 
Polytechnic Institute 



1896 



» 



ST 



L ' 



OCLC: 36819614 
Entered: 19970429 



Type 


t a 




BLvl 


: s 




S/L: 







Desc 


: a 




1 


040 




2 


007 




3 


043 




4 


090 




5 


090 




6 


049 




7 


110 


2 


8 


245 


10 


9 


246 


10 


10 


260 




11 


300 


- 


12 


310 




13 


362 





14 


515 




15 


500 




16 


533 





*d 1997. *c 

17 539 

18 610 20 





Rec stat: 


n 






Replaced: 


19970429 


Used: 19970429 


I 


Srce: d 


GPub: s 


Ctrl: Lang: eng 


a 


Conf : 


Freq: a 


MRec: Ctry: alu 




EntW: 


Regl : r 


ISSN: Alph: a 




Contj 


DtSt: d 


Dates: 1894,1899 1 



*e f *£ u *g b *h a *i u *j p I 



ELvl: 
Form: 
Orig: 
SrTp: 

AAA *c AAA I 
h *b c *d b 
n-us-al 1 
LD271 .A76 I 
*b 1 
AAAA f 

Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. I*' 
Catalogue of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute *h [microform] I 
Catalog of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute I 
Auburn, Ala. : *b The College, *c 1894-1899. I 
6 v. : *b ill. ; *c 23 cm. 1 . ~ ■ 

Annual 1 

1893-94-1898-99. 1 s 

Issue for 1898-99 carries designation 1899-1900. I 
"State Agricultural and Mechanical College. " I 

Microfilm. *m 1894-1899. *b Mobile, Ala. *c Document Technology, 
microfilm reels : negative ; 35 irart. f / 

d *b 1894 *c 1899 *d alu *e u *f u *g a I 
Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama *x Curricula *x- 



Periodicals. 1 '4 

19 780 00 Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. *t Catalogue of 
he State Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama I 

20 785 00 Alabama Polytechnic* Institute. *t Catalogue of the Alabama 
Polytechnic Institute I 

► 21 830 USAIN State and Local Literature Preservation Project I 






B. 



n LjivDi-.; /i 



POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE 



T T 



J I LtiLj.W'.J 



,-u: 



1896-97 



,. / 



RN UNIVERSITY 
LIBRARY 



1896/^7 

c.2 









'AN 'ssnDoj/^ 

' 3u i 'soaaaycrus 



y3aNI8l31Hd 

.iNnowvi ! 



^™»i 






7 



CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



j 




laknw : 




(11 



J 



nstitett 



. V 



♦. STATE 






AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL 



COLLEGE. 



1 896-97. 





AUHURN", ALABAMA. 



MONTGOMERY, ALA. : 

THE BROWN PRINTING CO., PRINTERS AND BINDERS. 

1897. 



r 



TRUSTEES. 



17** Excellency, Joseph F. Johnston, President Ex^officio. 

J. 0. Turner, Superintendent of Education Ex-officio. 



J. G. Gilchrist (term expires 1903) Hope Hull 

Tancred Betts .(term expires 1903) Huntstfille 

Walter 0. Whitaker (term expires 1903) Tuscaloosa 



Jo>athan Haralson (term expires 1901). ..... Selma 

Thos. Williams (term expires 1901). Wetumpka 

J. A. Bilbro (term expires 1901). ..... . ... . . . Gadsden 



I. F. Oulyer...... .(term expires 1899) Union Springs. 

J. C. Rich.. ............. . .(term expires IB99) Mobile. 

H. Clay Armstrong (term expires 1899) .Auburn. 

R. H. Duggar.. . . (term expires 1899 C Gallion. 



E. T. Glenn, Treasurer. 
J. H. Drake, M. D., Surgeon, 




1 



/ 214, /?7 

sarksdAle 



R* 



FACULTY AND OFFICERS. 






\ v 



Wm. LpROY BROUN, M. A., LL. D., 

President and Professor of Physics and Astronomy. 

OTIS D. SMITH, A. 3VL, 

Professor of Mathematics. 

P. H. MELL, M. E., Ph. D„ 

Professor of Botany and Geology. 

JAMES H. LANE, C. E,, A. M., Ph. D., LL. D., 

Professor of Civil Engineering and Drawing. 

CHARLES C. THACH, A. M., 

Professor of English and Political Economy. 

GEORGE PETRIE, M. A., Ph. D., 

Professor of History and Latin. 

A. F. McKISSICK, A. M., M. M. E., 

Professor of Electrical Engineering. ■ . r 

B. B, ROSS, M. So., 
Professor of General and Agricultural Chemistry and State Chemist. 

CHARLES H. ROSS, C. E., Ph. D., _ 

Professor of Modern Languages. 
J. J. WILMORE, M. E., 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director of Laboratory. 

C. A. CARY, B. Sc, D. -V. M., 

Professor of Physiology and Veterinary Science. 

MAGNUS 0. HOLfrS, 1st Lieut. 4th Inf. U. S. A. (West Point), 

Commandant and Professor of Military Science. 

E. R. MILLER, Phar. M., M. 8c, 

Professor of Pharmacy. ' 

J. F. DUGGAR, M. BQ., ' 
Professor of Agriculture. > 

F. S. EARLE, . 
Professor of Biology and\ Horticulture, 



W- 



2Q*7S$0 



-_ 



— 



-= 



■MM 



i 




J 



X 



C. F. BAKER, B. 8c, 

l 

Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

B. H. CRENSHAW, M. E., 

Instructor in Mechanic Arts. 

C. L. HARE, M. 8c, 

Instructor in Chemical Laboratory. 

R. J. TRAMMELL, C. E., 

Instructor in Mechanic Arts. 

H. H. KYSER, E. and M. E. t 

Instructor in Physical Laboratory. 

W. L. FLEMING, B. Sc, 

Assistant Librarian. 
W. J. BEESON, B. 8c, 
Assistant in English. 
W. M. WILLIAMS, B. Sc, 
Assistant in English and Mathematics. 
G. B. KELLEY, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Mathematics. 
C. N. ALFORD, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Civil Engineering and Drawing. 
FRANK BOYKIN, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Mechanic Arts. 
J. Q. BURTON, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Chemistry. k 

H. S. HENDERSON, B. Sc, 
Assistant Librarian of Experiment Station. 

J. B. EDWARDS, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Electrical Engineering, 

B. A. TAYLOR, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Veterinary Science. 




OFFICERS 

OF THE 

AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. 

COMMITTEE OF TRUSTEES ON EXPERIMENT STATION 

I. F. Culver. . . . . .\ .Union Springs . 

J. G. Gilchrist Hope Hull. 

H. Clay Armstrong Auburn. 

* ►♦* 

; d station! rninvrn | _^ 

Wm. LeRoy Broun ..:... . . . . . President. 

P. H. Mell.. . . .,, . ; . . .Botanist. 

B - B - Rose v # .Chemist. 

C. A. Cary Veterinarian. 

J. F. Duggar. Agriculturist. 

F. 8. Earle . . .Biologist and Horticulturist. 

C. F. Baker ..........,;.. .Entomologist. 

•♦♦ 

ii ASSISTANTS an 

J. T. Anderson, Ph. D.. .First Assistant Chemist. 

C. L. Hare, M. Sc .Second Assistant Chemist. 

R. G. Williams, M. Sc ........... .Third Assistant Chemist. 

T. U. Culver Superintendent of Farm. 



r\ 



^^■^■MB^^^ 



o . 




— — 



******** 



**"*?* •**? 






II 



- 



\ 




_c 



OBJECT OF THE COLLEGE. 



■i 



r 



The leading object of the College, in conformity with the 
act of Congress and the acts of the State Legislature, is to 
teach the principles and the applications of science. 

In its courses of instruction it gives prominence to the 
sciences and their applications, especially to those that, re- 
late to agriculture and the mechanic arts ; and at the same 
time the discipline obtained by the study of language and 
other sciences is not neglected. 

All students are require^ to study the English language. 
The Latin, French and German languages are also taught, 
and opportunity for their study is offered to students in any 
course. 

The special and technical instruction given is thus based 
on a sound, general education. 

The College, in fact, is a distinctive school of industrial 
science — or Polytechnic Institute — a title which, by reso- 
lution of the Trustees, is permitted to be inscribed in the 
catalogue, — and work of great value to the youth of the 
State is being accomplished by fitting them by a thorough 
science-discipline, in which manual training in the lower 
classes is made a prominent feature, for the successful and 
honorable performance of the responsible duties of life. 

While every attention is gfv$n to the mental discipline of 
the students in endeavoring to train them to habits of ac- 
curate scientific thought, and thus to qualify them for the 
duties of life, their moral and Christian training will always 
constitute the prominent care and thought of the Faculty. 



10 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute; 



< 



LABORATORIES AND FACILITIES FOR INSTRUC- 
TION. 

The College now possesses facilities for giving laboratory 
instruction in applied science in' the following departments: 

I— IN AGRICULTURE AND HORTICULTURE. 

The farm contains 226 acres, and is supplied with illus- 
trative specimens of stock of select varieties. 

The agricultural experiment station, established in con- 
nection with the College, where experiments and scientific 
investigations relating to agriculture are daily made, affords 
unusual opportunities to students to become familiar with 
agriculture, its defects and remedies. 

The students of agriculture accompany the professor in 
the field, garden, conservatory, stock-yard, etc., where lec- 
tures are delivered in the presence of the objects discussed, 
and during the year exercises in practical agriculture of an 
educational character are given the students who enter 

upon this course of study. 

■ ■ * 

II— IN MECHANIC ARTS. 

The laboratory of mechanic arts is used as an auxiliary 
in industrial education, and as a school in manual training 
in the arts that constitute the foundation of various indus- 
trial pursuits. The work performed by the students is i?i- 
structive in character, as in any other laboratory, and the 
classes are taught in sections by a series of graded lessons 
under the supervision of the professor. In the lower classes 
of the College each student enters this school, and is as- 
signed three exercises a week, each exercise being two 
hours long. v ' * 

The object of this laboratory is not to teach a trade, but 
to educate, to discipline and train the eye and the hand, as 
well as the mind, and thus by associating manual and 
mental training, to educate thoroughly the student for the 
duties of life, whatever may be his vocation. There is no 



■ 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 11 

attempt to teach students special skill in constructing arti- 
cles of commercial value, but all the exercises are syste- 
matically arranged and designed for purposes of education. 
The wood department is. located in a commodious hall, 
90 x 50 feet, and is provided with a twenty-five horse-power 
Corliss engine, a planer, circular saw, band-saw, two scroll 
saws, a buzz planer, twenty-four stands each with a lathe 
and a full set of tools, and thirty benches for carpentry 
work with the tools requisite for construction. 

A brick building, 30 x 87 feet, with two rooms, has been 
constructed especially for instruction in working iron. 

One room, is equipped with sixteen forges and tools re- 
quired for a forge department, and the other with a Colliau 
cupola furnace, a core oven, a brass furnace, moulding 
benches, a foundry crane constructed by students, and 
special tools for use in a foundry. 

The forge and foundry rooms are furnished with a Sturte- 
vant fan and exhauster, supplied with power from a ten 
horse-power engine, constructed by the students in me- 
chanic arts. 

The machine department occupies a brick building, 
60 x 50 feet, and is equipped with ten engine lathes, one 
speed lathe, one 20-inch drill press, one 10-inch sensitive 
drill, one post drill, one 16-inch shaper,.one 5-foot planer, 
one universal milling machine, a corundum tool grinder, a 
small emery grinder, a universal cutter and reamer grinder, 
a No. 1 Brown & Sharpe universal grinding machine, and 

a power hack saw. 

The chipping and filing department is arranged with 
benches, vises and tools for twelve students. 

The tool room is well supplied with special tools for use 
in instruction, including a machine for grinding twist drills. 
The rooms are lighted with electricity whenever necessary. 



» • 




12 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 






Ill-— IN PRACTICAL CHEMISTRY. 

The chemical laboratory is supplied with modern appa- 
ratus, and in its equipment affords excellent facilities for 
instruction in practical chemistry and for investigation. 

The investigations that are undertaken in this laboratory 
by scientific experts, in connection with the work of the 
agricultural experiment station, are of especial value to ad- 
vanced students, and afford them unusual opportunities to 
learn the methods of scientific research. The building con- 
tains a large general laboratory that will accommodate sixty 
students, a lecture room with capacity for one hundred 
seats, and nine other rooms, all appropriated to instruction 
and research in chemistry. 

IV— IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

The electrical laboratory is well supplied with modern 
appliances for instruction in electrical engineering. It 
occupies two large rooms in the basement, and is equipped 
with many fine instruments of precision: Kelvin deka- 
ampere balance, Kelvin graded current and potential gal- 
vanometers, Cardew voltmeter, Weston voltmeters and am- 
meter, Queen's magnetic vane voltmeter and ammeter, 
Thomson watt-meter, . Hartman and Braun voltmeter^ 
Kohlrausch ammeter, Wood ammeter, Weston alternating 
current voltmeter, Weston direct reading watt-meter, 
Queen's U Acme " testing set, Kelvin electrostatic voltmeter, 
Edison ammeters, and many other current-measuring instru- 
ments, resistance boxes, Wheatstone bridges, condensers, 
telephones, batteries, magnets, etc. 

The dynamos occupy a separate building and are opera- 
ted by a twenty-five horse -power Atlas engine, and a thirty- 
five horse-power Westinghouse engine. In this building 
are installed the followiug dynamos : 

Edison compound 12 Kilo-watt generator, Thomson- 
Houston 150 light 110 volt dynamo, Weston 150 volt 25 
ampere generator, Crocker- Wheeler one-horse power motor, 
Brush 6 arc light dynamo with lamps, two Baxter street car 



<£s 






Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 13 

motors, 20-horse power each (so connected as to be used as 
direct or alternating current motors or generators), one 
5 horse-power three phase motor, one General Electric 20- 
horse power motor, two bi-phase induction motors (built by 
students), one 9 light Thomson-Houston arc machine, two 
phase alternator and 500 volt 20 ampere generator, made by 
students. There is also in connection with this department 
at the experiment station, a ten-horse power motor, made 
by students, which is operated by the 500 volt generator in 
the dynamo room. 

v' v— IN PHYSICS. 

In the College building provision is made for elementary 
laboratory work in the department of physics. Special 
rooms in the basement are appropriated for this purpose, 
and are equipped with the necessary appliances for instruc- 
tion in practical physics. 

VI— IN MINERALOGY. 

• »M M '-t'V--'t » \ • 

This laboratory occupies a convenient room in the base- 
ment, and is provided with tables and appliances to accom- 
modate thirty students, with an excellent collection of 
minerals. 

VII— IN BOTANY. 

» ..... • 

In the work of the agricultural experiment station there 
is a botanical garden under the charge of the professor of 
botany, investigations in botany are given special attention, 
and opportunities are offered advanced students for practi- 
cal work in a laboratory especially fitted with microscopes, 
tables, a dark room for photographic work, and appliances 
needed for instruction and research. This department is 
provided with Auzoux's clastic models of seeds and flowers 
for teaching botany. 



f^"-* 



A 






14 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



I 






VIII— IN BIOLOGY. 

The laboratory in this department adjoins the lecture 
room of the professor, and is furnished with tables, excel- 
lent microscopes and appliances for investigation. Each^ 
student of the class works under the supervision of the 
professor. 

IX— IN ENGINEERING AND SURVEYING. 

The necessary apparatus for field work, including transits, 
levels, plane table, models of bridges, etc., is provided for ' 
the use of the students, and the customary exercises in the 
field are given. 

X— IN DRAWING. 

All students in the lower classes are required to take 
drawing, a study which tends to discipline the mind, as 
well as to train the eye and hand to accuracy of observation 
and execution. A. large, well-lighted drawing-room, that 
will accommodate fifty students, is 'provided with tables, 
lock boxes, etc. 

m . XI— IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

The mechanical course has been extended to include ex- 
perimental work in mechanical engineering. 

The apparatus available for this instruction is as follows : * 
A 25-horse power Harris-Corliss engine, a 35-horse power 
Westinghouse engine, a 25-horse power Atlas engine, two 
M-tiorse power engines constructed by students, the boilers 
belonging to the regular power plant, a small engine and 
boiler for the special purpose of making efficiency tests, a 
Deane duplex steam pump, # four-horse power gasoline 
engine, an Ericsson hot air engine, a Westinghouse air 
pump, four steam engine indicators, a separating calorime- 
ter, thermometers, a pyrometer, scales, a standard steam 
gauge with apparatus for testing steam gauges, a Crosby 
dead weight tester with weights for correcting the standard 
gauge, a 35,000-pound testing machine, a Henning micro- 
meter extensometer, and a Carpenter calorimeter with the 
necessary auxiliary apparatus for determining the heating 
value of different kinds of coal. 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



15 



This work is now carried on in the lower story of the 
annex to the chemical laboratory. This room is 30 x 60 feet 
in size and was specially designed and fitted up for this 
purpose. A three-inch steam main has been laid from the 
boiler house, thus securing a steam supply in the building 
for all work requiring it. The work is thoroughly practi- 
cal, and it is desired to extend it as rapidly as the funds 
available for the purchase of apparatus will allow. 

XII— IN PHYSIOLOGY AND VETERINARY SCIENCE. 

There has been constructed for the veterinary department 
a new and separate 'two-story building with nine rooms. It 
is provided with lecture room, office, working and operating 
rooms for clinical practice, and museum with skeletons of 
the domestic animals for instruction. Free clinics are 
given every Saturday for the benefit of the students in vete- 
rinary science. 

XIII — IN PHARMACY. 

The laboratory of this department occupies the second 
floor of the annex to chemical laboratory, and is provided 
with a sufficient supply of drugs and apparatus necessary 
for instruction in pharmaceutical preparations. 

The students work in the laboratory with the professor, 
from five to eight hours, six days in the week. 

It is expected to- increase the facilities as means are 

available.. - 

MILITARY TACTICS. 

Instruction in this department is given in conformity 
with the act of Congress. Students receive the benefit of 
regular military drill, and in addition the military system 
is used as a means of enforcing discipline and securing 
good order, promptness and regularity in the performance 

of academic duties. 
This department is under the charge of Lieut. M. U. 

Hollis, 4th Infantry, U. S. A. 

It is supplied with new cadet muskets and accoutrements 
for the corps, and for artillery practice, with two three-inch 
rifle guns, carriages and limbers. 



mmmmmmmm 



« 



* 



16 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 
COLLEGE BUILDINGS. 



The frontispiece is a representation of the main College building. 
It is 160 x 71 feet, and contains forty-five rooms. This building is 
not used for dormitories lor students, but is appropriated to pur- 
poses of instruction and investigation. 

It contains the lecture rooms and offices of the professors, labora- 
tories, library, museum, armory, etc. 

LANGDON HALL. 

This is a two-story building, 90 x 50 feet. The second story 
is the audience hall, used for commencement and other public occa- 
sions. 

The first story is appropriated to the laboratory of mechanic arts. 

THE CHEMICAL LABORATORY, 

As shown on the opposite page, is a two-story structure, 40 x 60 
feet, with a rear projection, 35 x 60 feet, of one-story and basement, 
and contains eight rooms. The exterior is of pressed brick, with cut 
stone trimmings and terra-cotta ornamentation. 

In the basement are ample accommodations for assaying and 
storage. 

The main laboratory will accommodate sixty students, and con- 
tains improved working tables, with water, gas and every necessary 
appliance for chemical work. 

The second story contains a lecture room and also a room used at 
present for the pharmaceutical laboratory. Around the lecture 
room are cases containing crude and manufactured products, illus- 
trating agricultural and industrial chemistry, prominent subjects 
taught in the institution. 

ANNEX, TO CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

This is a three-story brick building containing rooms for mechani- 
cal engineering, pharmacy, analytical chemistry and drawing. 






. 







CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 



\> 




■ 








:i : 






[] 



<0> 






i! 11 


' • 


■ t - 





\ 







GYMNASIUM. 

The recently constructed gymnasium is situated at the west end of the 
athletic grounds and contains one room, 80 x 40 feet, with truss-roof and 
strong beams 22 feet above for fastening the usual fixtures. It is equipped 
with Spalding's gymnasium apparatus and is open to all students at stated 
hours, under the care of an instructor. 



l! 



/ 




* > 



J 



\ 





V GRADUATES IN 1896. 

CLASS OF 1896. 
.. 

HONOR GRADUATES. 

COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 

Albert Lea Alexander. . . . . ........ Georgia. 

COURSE IN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

William Henry Harrison Trammell .Lee. 

COURSE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 
George Bates Kelley — Jefferson. 

GENERAL COURSE. 

Walter Lynnewood Fleming... . . . Pike. 

DEGREES. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. 

Albert Lea Alexander,. . .Georgia. 

Charles Nutting Alford . .Marshall. 

Andrew Beirne Andrews. Tennessee. 

Marion Joseph Bancroft ; Mobile. 

William James Beeson. . . . Etowah. 

John Simeon Bennett .Lee. 

Sidney Josiah Bross. ............. Coosa. 

Joseph Quarterman Burton Lee. 

Henry Kozer Casey. — Jefferson. 

LeRoy Abda Christian Shelby. 

James Washington Culver — — Lee. 

Hubert Alberto Drennen .....Jefferson. 

Oba DeVan Dumas ,y • Wilcox. 

Jesse Boland Edwards. ........ Talladega. 

John Cuthbert Farley. s . ..... . ... ....... .Lee. 

Walter Lynnewood Fleming Pike. 

John Louis Glenn Butler. 

Annie Florence Heard Lee. 

flampton Sanders Henderson Talladega. 

f 




r 



{ 



» 

. . % 

18 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

J 

Richard Sparks Jackson Jefferson. 

George Bates Kelley .Jefferson. 

William Berrian Kelly .. . .. Montgomery. 

Garry DeVon King . . . Georgia. 

James Lewis Moulder \ Georgia. 

Julian Berry Oglesby . ........ ..... . . Georgia. 

John Albin Reeves Cherokee. 

Benjamin Asbury Taylor.. .Autauga. 

Walker Reynolds Tichenor Georgia. 

William Abner Tippin . '.. . . Florida. 

William Henry Harrison Trammell Lee. 

Robert Edward Lee Weathers Randolph. 

Estelle'Love Wh i taker. . ....:......... . . . Lee. 

Frank Lewis Whitman. Lee. 

William Martin Williams. Georgia. 

Bryce Hewitt Wilson . ; ... Franklin. 

MA8TER OP SCIENCE. 

Henry Hinds Peevey (B. 8c, '9§). . . .' .Madison. 

Harry Howell Smith (B. Sc , '95) ..Lee. 

ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEER. 

Henry Hearst Kyser (B. Sc, '95). ...... , % . Talladega. 

James Claude Thomason (B. Sc , '95) Randolph 

John Adams Wills (B. Sc, '95). ^ . . / i ee 

PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMIST. 

Solon Lycurgus Coleman (B Sc, '95) Marengo. 

MINING ENGINEER. 
John Presley Slaton (B. Sc, '94, C. E.,'95). .'.Macon. 



\ 



-s 






> 



DISTINGUISHED STUDENTS. 



Students who receive a grade above 90 in three studies in the 
freshman class, in four in the sophomore, in five in 
the junior, and in six in the senior, are dis- 
tinguished for excellence in schol- 
arship, and are awarded 

■ * 

HONOR CERTIFICATES. 

The following students received honor certificates in 1896: 

SENIOR CLASS. 

Albert Lea Alexander ......... .Georgia. 

Andrew Beirne Andrews. . ... — .Tennessee, 

William James Beeson ........: Etowah. '•■-,.- 

Hubert Alberto Drennen — Jefferson. 

Oba DeVan Dumas.. .........:. — .. ...... .....Wilcox. 

Jesse Boland Edwards. Talladega. 

Walter Lynnewood Fleming .'-. Pike. 

,Annie Florence Heard — Lee. 

Hampton Sanders Henderson .Talladega. 

George Bates Kelley Jefferson. 

James Lewis Moulder. ... Georgia. 

William Henry Harrison Trammel! .Lee. 

Estelle Love Whitaker. . . .... .Lee. 

Bryce Hewitt Wilson. ."...' . . . ; . .Franklin. 

HONOR STUDENTS IN THE JUNIOR CLASS. 

COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 

Edwin Boyce Joseph ... .Montgomery. 

COURSE IN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

Clarence Neil Jones. , Montgomery. 

COURSE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

George Nathan Mitcham. . . .Georgia. 

GENERAL COURSE. 
Peyton Graves Clark. • Montgomery. 



>j 



J 



20 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

Peyton Graves Clark . Montgomery. 

Thomas Ganaway Conner. .......;... Macon. 

William Welch Hill.. .....*.. ... .Talladega. 

John Buford Hobdy . . , Bullock. 

George Michael Holley. ... ...■•; Georgia. 

Clarence Neil Jon.es ; . Montgomery. 

. Edwin Boyce Joseph. ... Montgomery. 

George Nathan Mitcham Georgia. 

William Jacob Nixon. , Tennessee. 

Frederick Lloyd Tate Russell 

William Tilman Warren [[,[[[ Montgomery. 

Reuben David Webb.:.... .Coosa 

SOPHOMORE CLASS* 

Thomas Harrison Clower ... L ee 

William VJenefee Dean. . ...........;. Georgia 

George Oliver Dickey ,...'. ^ ^Crenshaw. 

Clifford Lamar Edwards f .. L ee 

Francis Williams Hare. ...][ * ][ "' ' ' Lee * 

Charles Edward Harrison Florida 

Harry Streety Houghton. . . j^n^ 

w:n- ™ i »t ? ■""«.«..•;••. — ,. Jefferson. 

WilhamEarle Hudmon... ., Tc 

Joseph Wood King ... . : ...Lee.. 

Peter Mastin Mclntyre. ... '■' ' 7 V : • • ''™°*&*> 

Henry Edmund Memminger/. . .'.' '. ' ' "'" w^T 

William Augustus Mitchell... South Carolina. 

Robert Stewart Parker. . ■"' £ eor g ,a - 

Alexander Simpson Pow.... ' "". • •• -»«mter. 

Almuth Cunningham Vandiver;: ^.^^[Zl'.i Snadegli. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

George Price Cooper ,, .. 

James Francis Dobbin....."." '***? n ' 

Flake Earle Farley . ......... .\\ ' " " ' ' * * lor,da ' 

Isham Fennell McDonnell ••••... Lee. 

George Madison Wheeler " • !; a .! SOn * 

Julien Chandler Yonge... ! Madison. 

6 Florida. 



J 



r 



CATALOGUE QF STUDENTS. 

FOR THE SESSION OF 1896-97. 

..." ' ^ i ♦ » » i ' 

Graduate Students. 

[Residence is Alabama when State is not given.] 

NAME. RESIDENCE. 

Albert Lea Alexander ........... .......... Georgia. 

Charles Nutting Alford .Marshall. 

William James Beeson ;.... ....Etowah, 

Frank Boykjn. .Lee. 

Joseph Quarterman Burton. '•■£ .Lee. 

George Webster Duncan .Lee. 

Jesse Boland Edwards . .Talladega. 

Walter Lynnewood Fleming . ......... . . . . .Pike. 

Hampton Sanders Henderson .Talladega. . 

Walter Pearce Holcombe . ..." Mobile. 

George Bates Kelley . . . .Jefferson. 

Benjamin Asbury Taylor .... . . Autauga.' , 

Walker Eeynolds Tichencfc Georgia. 

Sheldon Lyne Toomer • Lee. 

William Henty Harrison Trammell . Lee. 

William Martin Williams. . . .Georgia. 

Undergraduate- Students. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

Emile Glines Abbott ... .Georgia. 

William Kirk Armstrong .Lee. 

Erister Ashcraft •••••• e# 

Bichar4 Manning Boykin . S. Carolina. 

Edge worth Stephens Casey. ..... Jefferson. 

Peyton Graves Clark . . . . • • Montgomery. 






1 4 






^ 




wi' mr 



— ■ 




22 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

Kobert Walter Collins. ................... .Hale. 

Thomas Ganaway Conner Macon. ' 

George Leonard Faucett ...... ........ Eandolph. 

, William Alexander Fitzgerald. . Georgia. 

Arthur Williamson Greene ........... . Chambers. 

Gaston Greil. .Montgomery. 

Joseph Herzfeld Tallapoosa. 

John Fletcher Heard Lee. 

William Welch Hill. ....... . .....;,... .Talladega. 

John Buford Hobdy Bullock. 

George Michael Holley ..... Georgia 

William Alexander Hood. ......... ... .Jefferson. 

Cassius Rex Hudson-... ........ .Lee 

Clarence Neil Jones. ' '[', [[[[[ ^Montgomery. 

Edwin Boyce Joseph ............ Montgomery. 

Adus Edwin Killebrew Dale. 

Earle Foster Lee ............ L ee 

William Parker Leonard \] \\ " Georgia. 

Warren Horton McBryde .... * * Mobile 

WilliamWriceMcLeran... ...... .^[^Ub^- 

George Nathan Mitcham Georgia 

Wade Hampton Negus n\\ • . . 

Charles Johnston Nelson " ^ 18S1 PP I - 

William Jacob Nixon . . ' £ 

Benjamin Sweat Patrick.' " %?- ' ' " ' ' ' ^ l^T' 

James Lawrence Pollard ' " " S „ luUL 

Leonard Callaway Pratt ' " ' * " " ' " " J^ 

John Pnrifoy . . . " •Bibb. • 

JohnWesleyPurifoy" ••••'•••'•• ' Jf* 

Berry Lathnm Scott ■*"' J 8 "* 

Oliver John Semmes. " I*™' 

Samuel Toliver Slaton ■•■•■■■ •..- Mobile. 

Frederick Lloyd Tate ' -Macon 

Merrick Do wdell Thomas " ' ' ' ™"' 

Paul Vines... Chambers. 

William Tilman Warren ••••••••••• Tallapoosa. 

Beuben David Webb * " " "Montgomery. 

'•• Coosa. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 23 

Noble James Wiley Montgomery. 

George Wrigley . ,. . ., Georgia. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Lemuel Sledge Allen . Marengo. 

Erin Black . . Lee. 

William Brown Beeson ...... .Jackson. 

Carter Berry . . .Tallapoosa. 

Arthur Julian Bingham Talladega. 

Mary Wright Boyd Lee. 

William Hamill Bruce. .Montgomery. 

Alexander Humphreys Clark Montgomery. 

Thomas Harrison Clower . . ....... ...... , .Lee. , 

Henry Neal Coleman Lowndes. 

Carmotte Ashley Cobb. Montgomery. 

William Menefee Dean . . . . .... Georgia. 

George Oliver Dickey Crenshaw. 

Duncan Patterson Dixon Talladega. 

Clifford Lamar Edwards Lee. 

Richard Roe Eppes. . ."". ..... ........ ...Marengo. 

Frank Farley .Lee. 

Frank Reese Frazer. r». .Lee. 

William Shelby Garner ..:...... .^.Shelby. . 

John Wommack Giddens. .... .Crenshaw. 

Elmer Wynn Gray . . ...... Georgia, 

Jonathan Haralson .. Dallas. 

Pearl Hanson Lee. 

Francis Williams Hare Lee. 

Charles Edward Harrison ^. . . Florida. 

Harry Streety Houghton Jefferson. 

William Earle Hudmon Lee. 

John \v illiam Jepson . 8. Carolina. 

Joseph Wood King. Georgia. 

Absalom Mason Kennedy Montgomery. 

George Clarence Lazenby Butler. 

Jessie Hamilton Lockhart ......... .... . Georgia, 

George Edward Mason — ............. .. .Shelby. 



t e 



r 



m 



n 






\ 



24 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

John Richard McCalla •••••• ^ jee - 

Peter Mastin Mclntyre Montgomery. 

Henry Edmund Memminger S. Carolina. 

William Augustus Mitchell ". • • .Georgia. 

Benjamin Otey Miuge , ... Marengo. 

Frank Green Morriss Talladega. * 

Julia Hill Moore ....... .Lee. \ 

John St. Clair Paden. .....: Etowah. 

Robert Stewart Parker Sumter. 

Harry John Pettus. . . .Montgomery. 

Alexander Simpson Pow ......... V. Jefferson. 

Annie Lucinda Purifoy . . . Lee- 
Arthur McBride Ransom ...... . . . . . . .Georgia. 

Halbert Clyde Ray . /..,............ Geneva. 

Harvey Owen Sargent Franklin. 

Robert Pinkney Scarbrough ..... . Russell. 

Marie Louise Scott . .Lee. 

Selwyn Sutton Scott ... .Lee. 

Newton Caraway Smith. .Shelby. 

Clifford West Stewart. .Montgomery. 

William Livingston Stewart. Montgomery. 

William Bee Stokes ............ Marion. 

Edward Wadsworth Stone . . . Montgomery. 

Cecil Pitts Stowe * . . Lee. 

Rush Price Strong. ..... Mobile. 

Joseph Wilson Sutcliffe. ..-..,. .Louisiana. 

Thomas Harrison Tutwiler. .Jefferson. 

Almuth Cunningham Vandiver. ..... Talladega. 

Bishop Billing Warwick . . . . . . . . .Talladega. 

John Wesley Williams .Lee. , 

Joseph Leonard Wood. .Mobile. 

Neander Montgomery Woods Tennessee. 

William Wren Mobile. 

SOPHOMORE CLA8S. 

LeRoy Jones Allen Marengo. J 

Jesse Maldrie Atkinson Dale. 

Alston Boyd •Tennessee. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 25 

William Bowdon Beard ; Pike. 

Bailey Edgar Brown Morgan. 

Emmett Gale Buck Mobile. 

Thomas Greene Bush . ." Calhoun. 

Joseph Peyton Carson .!........ .Lee. 

John Wesley Camp v Georgia. 

Osborn Henry Chapman "... ...Pike. 

Henry Perkins Chappell . . . .;'. .Bullock. 

Charles Wallace Collins ...... t Hale. 

George Davis Collins Hale. 

McNeill Crawford ...... Lee. 

Colonel Seldon Crew .. . ...Coosa. 

Frederick Bobert Daly Jefferson. 

Bolivar Davis Jefferson. 

Claude Davidson. . . .Georgia. 

James Francis Dobbin Florida. 

Allan Willis Elkins . Texas. 

Flake Earle Farley -r. Lee. 

Arthur Henry Feagin. Bullock. 

Hugh Matherson Fenn. .* Barbour. 

Gilford Cad well Gilder . .*. Montgomery. 

William Armistead Gilder Montgomery. 

John Boss Glenn. Lee. 

Henry Everette Harvey . . . . . .Lee. 

Charles Thomas Hightower Georgia. 

Felix Grundy Horn. ... . ............. .. ( .'. .Sumter. 

Charles Vines Ingram .Lee. 

Emmett Francis Jackson . . • • Lee. j 

Buf us Lee Jenkins Lee. 

Walter Eldridge Johnson Madison. 

Joseph Landman ..'..... ..Madison. 

Howard Felix Landman • Madison. 

William Bibb Leedy .Jefferson. 

William Elliott Matthews . .Madison. 

Thomas Herring McAdory Jefferson. 

Isham Fenaell McDonnell Madison. 

Frank McLean. • .Montgomery. 






r 




H 



/ 

'26 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

Barton Harris McQueen ....'./ Montgomery. 

Charles Henry Merrit't , — Chilton. 

Chad wick Wiley Minge . . . . Marengo. 

Hartley Allen Moon . . . Coosa. 

Osburu Bogers Moore -.'.... Butler. 

Collet Henry Munger . . . . . Jefferson. 

Daniel Bobbins Nettles . . Monroe. 

Angelo Marvin Nowlin DeKalb. 

Francis Franek Oser . . Louisiana. 

James Boyden Peabody Georgia. 

William Hamet Pinson Sumter. 

Frank Gordon Babb Lowndes. 

Lawrence Bratton Bainey DeKalb. 

Archie McDonnell Bobinson Madison. 

John Osgood Bush .Lee. 

William Oscar Scroggs. .... Georgia. 

Benjamin Lewis Schuessler Chambers. 

William Leon Sellers Bullock. 

James Cary Slaton. . ."...- . .... .Macop. 

Wade Hampton Shipp ......... Georgia. 

John Cherry Smith Lee. 

William Boykin Skinner. ...... ......... . .Marengo. 

Dozier Turner. Elmore. 

George Newman Ward ; , , • Henry. 

James Alfred Ward . . ... . . . ■ .. Madison. 

James Luther Watson. .Wilcox 

Thomas William Wert Morgan. 

George Madison Wheeler ..... ; . Madison. 

John Butledge Williams Jefferson. 

Moses Conrad Wright Macon. 

Julien Chandler Yonge .....;.. Florida. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

James Aiken. . . . .:............... Etowah. 

James Anderson Allen. Jefferson. 

Earle Beese Anderson ' Georgia 

Eobert Pterc6 Baldwin - . ... \ \ \ [xee. 

Guy French Boyd. .!..!..! ^Lee. 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 27 

Jesse Wright Boyd Lee. 

Abner Mason Buchanan /. Lee. 

Boscoe Bulger .2^ Tallapoosa. 

Judson Lamar Burke . rf . ..'..' ■' . Lee. 

Salmon Holmes Burns. Lee. 

Kelly Walker Burwell. . . . . Madison. 

Ellis Alford Carter. . .3 Lee. 

Murray Mooreman Campbell. ... .Lauderdale. 

Frank Bovard Chapman Louisiana. 

Wiliiam LeVert Christian Shelby. 

Sterling Kich Coleman '., Wilcox. 

Warren Lewis DeBardeleben ...... .... Autauga, 

William Crawford Dowdell. ............. .Lee. 

William Beach Dozier . .... Georgia. 

Isaac Boss Edwards., ... ...V;.... ....Talladega. 

Bobert Emmett Fitzgerald i Georgia. 

Sherman Guy Forbes Henry. 

Joseph Henry Glover . . ... Georgia. 

James Olney Goggaas. . . . .. . ... .". . . .Tallapoosa. 

Edgar Jones Graham • • • • .Tennessee. 

Henry Daniel Green .....,......: v. . . Georgia. 

John Dabney Hamilton ............ .Marion. 

Wesley Moss Harrison .Lee. 

Edward Zellars Heard. Lee. 

Samf ord LeBoy Jordan Russell. 

Walter Atlee Jordan , • • • E l more - 

Wilbur Eldrad Kelley .......... . ..J&fferson. 

Strother Trabue Key Jefferson. 

Howard Makolm Kilpatrick Georgia. 

John Maples r W« • • • • • • .Bussell. 

James Guy Marcrum ...Georgia. 

George Matthews Marks .Montgomery. 

Marvin Hilliard McCalla .:.. ..Lee. 

Henry Clyde McDavid. .Florida. 

John Thomas Mcintosh v .1 • - .Tallapoosa. 

Kenneth Bethune McKenzie. .Butler. 

Edward Pinson McLennan Barbour. 



t ■ 






. 



Bta 



( 



28 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



Lafayette Murdoch Meriwether. . . Montgomery. 

David Harrison Minge *\ Marengo. 

Jordan Holsey Mitchell $> Lee. 

. Llewellyn Perry Motley . . .^. . . Lee. 

Richard Gordon Mynatt. Talladega. 

Lawson Harrison Nunnelly Tennessee. 

Clovis Marvin Pearce Marion. 

Hiram Perry Powell Georgia. 

Cleveland Curry Purifoy , Lee. 

Carlock Rand Madison. 

Samuel Lowrie Robertson . . .Jefferson. 

James Richard Rutland. . Chambers. 

John Watson Rutland. .....' . Lee. 

William Stowe Rutledge ; Lee. 

William Winffed Shuff . .Talladega. 

Joseph Bingham Stray horn ... Tennessee. ; 

Frederick Blount Shepard. Mobile. 

John Marion Tamplin. ... . .Lee. 

Mallory Hunt Taylor. . ...... Jj. ......... Georgia. 

Henry Barnett Thompson. ..... . : Lee. 

John Felix Walker . r Dallas. 

Alfred Taylor Whiteside Tennessee. 

James Waldo Woodruff. ; \\\ Georgia. 

SPECIAL AND IRREGULAR STUDENTS. 

Abbreviations: Ph.-Pharmacy ; E. & M. E.-Electrical and Me- 
chanical Engineering; C.-Chemistry ; Ag.-Agnculture ; C. E.- 
Civil Engineering. 

John Cocke Abernathy Ph Florida. 

Paul Otey Anderson /..... L ees 

Harriet Lavinia Dabney Bondurant Lee. 

Charles Lewis Bragaw p H v Lee. 

Lewis Edward Byrum. . ....... . E . & M . e.'.V.K Carolina. 

Charles Alexander Carmon ...... E . & m. e, . .Texas 

James Hardin Crawford p H Georgia. 

bamuel Walter Cunningham. .... ........ .Mobile 

4 John Leigh Creary ..*.......... Florida 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 29 

Arthur Henry Davis Mobile. 

Marion Dawson Elmore. 

Charles Washington Drake Ph ....;.. . Madison. 

Ellis Madison Duncan .' ,'. Franklin. 

Luther Noble Duncan ..... . . , Franklin. 

Ramon Antonio Eraso .... Venezuela. 

Oliver Hazard Perry Fant E. & m. e. . ..S. Carolina. 

Robert Clark Fenton .. c. e ..... . ..Connecticut. 

William Bullock Fleming Ag .... Montgomery. 

Michael Thomas Fullan e. & m. e .. . . Georgia. • 

Bernard Law Greene .e. & m. e . . . .Etowah. 

William LeGarde Hamilton. .... . Ph Talladega. | 

Fletcher Dumas Harvey . # Ph ... ^ ... . Lee. 

Walter Avery Henson Tennessee. 

Miller Reese Hutchison e. & m. e... .Mobile. 

John Tait Jenkins Ph Madison. 

John David Johnston Ph , Pike. 

Emmett Armistead Jones . Ph Marengo. 

Charles Tulane Kidd...... .... .Ph.... . Montgomery. 

Kate Meade Lane Lee. 

Richard Chalmers Leavell S. Carolina. 

Earle Benjamin Lentz ...... c. E. . . Mobile. 

Frederick Lee Martin .Autauga. 

John Nefson Mixon Conecuh. 

Walter Wilson McGowan Ph Shelby. 

George Fleming Moore Montgomery. 

Ashleigh Strudwick Moses . . . e. & m. e. . . . Baldwin. 

Thomas Joseph Norris ' a . Jefferson. 

John Morgan Richeson . . Ag. . . . Hale. 

Samuel Bernard Rice • .Montgomery. 

Miguel Jose Romero c. & Ag . . . .Venezuela. 

Joseph Schwartz Ph .Marengo. 

James Barrie Shivers Ph Perry. 

Benjamin Franklin Seay Bullock. 

Ambrose Lee Scarbrough Ph Russell. 

Sidney Ewing Simpson .... Montgomery. 

Clara Tennille Montgomery. 



■■ 



~m*mmm~mm—mmmm—mm 



\ 



^- 



30 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

Fannie Louise Thomas .Lee. 

* Frank Waters Van Ness e. & m. e . . . Tennessee. 

Henry BeScham Visscher Ph Florida. 

Daniel Wheeler E. & M. E . . . Mobile. 

Richard Clarke Wilson . . Ph Wilcox. 

SUB-FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Stearnes Pearson Baker.. .. . . .Tallapoosa. 

Joseph Nathaniel Barker . , . . : Franklin. 

^ George Douglas Bush Georgia. 

John Thomas Camp. . . . Jefferson. 

Andrew Crozier Cameron Jefferson. 

William James Cameron Jefferson. 

William Austin Campbell Tennessee, 

Samuel Anthony Cefalu . . Jefferson. 

Henry Reed Childress ... Etowah. 

John Isham Dorsey . . . . Lee. 

Hunter Dunnaway Wilcox. 

Marviu Joshua Ellis ....... .Autauga. 

Philip Washburn Gooch ...... ... . . .Jefferson. 

Cecil Groves. .Sumter. 

Charles Calhoun Guy ... f .... . .8. Carolina. 

James George Hardy Dallas. 

Wallace Benjamin Harrison ............... Talladega. 

Hubbard Hobbs Kelly.. Madison. 

Henry James Lamar . Georgia. 

Walter Douglas Lamar. . . Georgia. 

Leon Phillippe LeHardy. Georgia! 

James Randolph Livingston Georgia. 

Benjamin Lee McGee Georgia. 

Andrew McCord L ee 

John Alexis Matthews. Madison. 

Samford Mitchell Meadows .Lee. 

Benjamin Baldwin Meriwether ][]]. ] ' .Montgomery 

Alva Tuttle Moreland Russell 

Abram Hill Mitchell. , [[[' ^ Lee 

i^ Peter Preer Myhand .!...! ..Lee. 



"? 



Total .....: 357 

NUMBER OF STUDENTS IN EACH SUBJECT OF STUDY. 

English..... 277 Geology... 46 

History 196 Civil Engineering 12 

French ... . . 47 Electrical Engineering. . 55 

German 33 Mechanical Engineering. 46 

Latin..... 144 Biology........ 16 

Mental Science 25 Drawing. 188 

Political Economy 41 Mechanic Arts 204 

Mathematics .279 Military Tactics 319 

Chemistry .138 Mineralogy 5 

Chemical Laboratory 60 Physical Laboratory 56 

Agriculture. .. .112 Physiology 52 

Physics 168 Veterinary Science ..... 45 

Botany 89 Pharmacy , 27 

3 



/ 



O' 



> 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 31 

Samuel Bradley Nettles Monroe. 

Charles Daniel Odom. .... Jefferson. 

Marvin Franklin Owens Cleburne. 

Frank Connor Pinkston .; ....Chilton. 

James Edward Prouty Etowah. 

Edgar Prescott Rutland . .-....' Lee. 

Thomas Elmer Rutland Chambers, 

Jesse Gilbert Sells Georgia. 

Charles Lewis Sudduth ......... , Lee. 

Sidney Goode Tait ... ....... .Wilcox. 

Elijah Albert Turner Lee. 

Herbert George Weedon Barbour. 

John Shuler Williamson Chilton. 

Summary. 

Graduates 16 

Senior Class 45 

Junior Class 66 

Sophomore Class , 71 

Freshman Class . . 65 

Special and Irregular Students ,'. 51 

Total in College Classes 314 

Sub-Freshman Class. 43 






MILITARY ORGANIZATION, 

1896-97. 



: 



*\ 



President, 
W. L. BROUN. 

Commandant, 
M. 0. HOLLIS, 1st Lieut. 4th Infantry, U. 8. A. 

Surgeon, 
J. H. DRAKE, M. D. 

Battalion Staff. 

Cadet Captain J. B. Hobdy, Assistant to Commandant. 
Cadet 1st Lieutenant G M. Holley, Adjutant. 
Cadet 1st Lieutenant W. H. Negus, Quartermaster. 
Cadet Sergeant P. M. McIntyre, Sergeant Major. 
Cadet Sergeant C. W. Stewart, Quartermaster Sergeant. 

Cadet Captains. 

3. B. S. Patrick, 

4. P.G.Clark. 

Cadet First Lieutenants. 

5. R. D. Webb, 
*> 6. W.J. Nixon, 

7. C. N. Jones, 

8. W. A. Fitzgerald. 

Cadet Second Lieutenants. 

3. W.A. Hood, 

4. G. N. Mitcham. 
Cadet First Sergeants. 

3. A. C. Vandiver, ' 

4. F. W. Hare. 

Cadet Sergeants. 

9. H. S. Houghton, 

10. W. L. Stewart, 

11. J. S. Paden, 

12. A. MoB. Ransom, 

13. C. L. Edwards, 

14. A. H. Clark, 

15. R. P. Strong, 



1. W. T. Warren, 

2. E. B. Joseph, 

1. Jno. Puripoy, 

2. C. J. Nelson, 

3. J. L. Pollard, 

4. B. L. Scott, 

1. E. S. Casey, 

2. R. W. Collins, 

1. H. E. Memminger, 

2. W. A. Mitchell, 



1. J. C Abernathy, > 

2. J.W.Williams, 

3. j. w. sutclippe, 

4. G. E. Mason, 

5. G. 0. Dickey, 

6. W. M. Dean, 

7. T. H. Clower, 

8. W. B. Stokes, 



17. F. R. Frazer. 



16. J. B. Shivers, 



it 



mmm^ 



— — . 



— = 







B^= 



y 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



33 



l. J. C. YoNGE, 

2. I. F. McDonnell, 

3. G. M. Wheeler, 

4. W. E. Matthews, 
5 J. F. Dobbin, 

6. J. Landman, 

7. T. W. Wert, 

8. C..W. Minge, 



Cadet Corporals. 

9. C. T. Hightower, 

10. T.G. Bush, 

11. H. F. Landman, 

12. B. L. Greene, 

13. J. R. Peabody, 

14. W. B. Lbedy, 

15. O. H. Chapman, 

16. L. B. Rainey. 



— 






I 



■ 



34 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 



Applicants for admission must be of good moral character. 
To enter the freshman class the applicant must be not less 
than fifteen years of age, and should be qualified to pass a 
satisfactory examination on the following subjects : 

1. Geography, and History of the United States. 

2. English — (a) An examination upon sentences contain- 
ing incorrect English, (b) A composition giving evidence 
of satisfactory proficiency in spelling, punctuation, grammar, 
and division into paragraphs. 

L Reading, The composition in 1897 will be upon sub- 
jects drawn from one or more of the following works : Shake- 
speare's Julius Ccesar and Longfellow's Evangeline, Irving's 
Sketch Book, Scott's Marmion, Hughes's Tom Brown at 
Rugby, Dickens's David Copperjkld, Scott's Ivanhoe, South- 
ey's Life of Nelson. 

The candidate will be required to present evidence of a 
general knowledge of the subject matter, and to answer 
simple questions on the lives of the authors. This part of 
the examination is intended to test only a general knowledge 
of the substance of the books. 

IL Study and Practice. This part of the examination 
presupposes the thorough study of each of the following 
works: — & 

Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice, Burke's Speech on Con- 
ciliation loith America; Macaulay's Essay on Milton. 

Preparation and examination on these works will be nec- 
esary before the student is classed as regular. 

3. Mathematics— (a) Arithmetic, including fundamental 
operations; common and decimal fractions; denominate 
numbers; the metric system ; percentage, including interest 
and discount ; proportion ; extraction of square and cube 
roots. . (b) Algebra, to quadratic equations. 

Those applicants who desire to continue the study of 
Latin should be qualified to pass a satisfactory examination 
in Latin grammar and the first two books of Camr, in ad- 
dition to the above subjects. * 
-For admission to the higher classes, students should be 



^^— 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 35 

prepared to stand $ satisfactory examination in all of the 
studies of the lower classes, as shown in the courses of 
study. Where opportunity has not been offered to pursue 
special studies required at this College, the system of equiv- 
alents will be adopted, and studies which denote an equiv- 
alent amount of discipline and training will be accepted as 
satisfactory. But if not prepared to pass an examination 
in history and chemistry at the time of application, the ap- 
plicant will be required before graduation to pass a satis- 
factory examination on those subjects. 

ADMISSION ON CERTIFICATE. 

Applicants will be admitted without examination on pre- 
senting a certificate from any of the certificate schools 
named herein. 

The following educational institutions having made appli- 
cation to be correlated to this College, and having presented 
an approved course of study, are hereby declared to be 
certificate schools, and are granted the privilege set forth 
in the following resolution : 

"Students from certificate schools will be admitted to the 
"freshman class witlwut examination upon the certificate of 
"the president or principal showing definitely that such 
"students have completed satisfactorily all the studies 
" required for admission, as stated in the catalogue, and are 
"otherwise admissible." 

certificate schools. 

University Military School, Mobile'. .... J. D. Wright. 
*Verner Military Institute, Tuscaloosa . . W. H. Verner. 

^University School, Montgomery J. M. Starke. 

*Mt. Willing High School, Mt. Willing . . J. D. Garrett. 

State Normal School, Jacksonville J. Forney. 

Male Academy, Huntsville Puryear & Wyatt. 

*State Normal College, Florence J. K. Powers. 

Furman Academy, Livingston. L. A. Cockrell. 

* — . 

♦Applicants are admitted to the sophomore class on approved cer- 
tificates from these institutions. 



& 



36 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 






High School, Opelika . . J. M. Small wood. 

University Military School, Clanton . . . . E. Y. McMorriss. 

N. A. Agricultural School, Athens M. K. Clements. 

W. Ala. Agricultural School, Hamilton. . Jas. E. Alexander. 

Eutaw Male Academy, Eutaw . H. 0. Horton. 

Waverly Institute, Waverly A. W. Holstun and 

J. D. Lane. 
Taylor's School, Birmingham . .- . . . W. P. Taylor. 

ADMISSION OF YOUNG WOMEN. 

The privilege of becoming students in this College is 
granted by the Trustees to young women of mature mind 
and character, on the following conditions : 

The applicant must be eighteen years of age* and if a 
candidate for a degree, be able to pass a satisfactory exam- 
ination in each of the four subjects as named below. 

If the applicant is a candidate for admission as a special 
or irregular student, she must be able to pass a satisfactory 
examination in two of the subjects named. 

(a) In English— Proficiency in spelling and punctuation ; 
Grammar (Whitney's Essentials of English); Rhetoric (Lock- 
wood, Abbott's How to Write Clearly, Genung); Scudder's 
Amerioan Prose Selections ; Scudder's American Poems. 

(b) In History— Macy's Our Government; Chambers's 
History of the United States; Myers's General History. 

(c) In Mathematics— Arithmetic; Algebra, including 
quadratic equations, logarithms and series ; Plane and Solid 
Geometry; Plane and Analytical Trigonometry, as in Went- 
worth. 

(d) In Latin— Grammar, including the forms and syn- 
tax; Jones's Latin Prose Composition ; Translation of selec- 
tions from Cassar, Nepos, Virgil, Cicero's Orations, Cicero's 
Letters, or the equivalent. 

Tie equivalents of these subjects, as in above text-books, may 
be substituted. " 

Botany will constitute a required part of the general 
course for young women who are candidates for a degree. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



37 



A 



When admitted, upon complying with the conditions 
above stated, they may enter upon the study of any subject 
taught in the College, and join any class, for which upon 
examination they may be found qualified. The only con- 
dition imposed will be that they engage in earnest study, 
and attend the exercises regularly. They will board in the 
town with private families and attend college only at the 
hours of their exercjses. 

The Trustees authorize the Faculty to admit a candidate 
for a degree at the age of seventeen, provided she is able to 
comply with all the requirements* for admission in the four 
subjects named and the application meets with its ap- 
proval. 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS. 

Entrance examinations will be held on Wednesday, the 

15th of September, the day on which the session opens. 

Candidates will also be examined during the session, when 

application is made for admission. 

Applicants who are not prepared to stand the entrance 

examinations for full admission to the freshman class are 

admitted to the sub-college department. 

They will be. advanced to full admission to the freshman 

class when they are qualified to pass satisfactorily the 

required examinations- 
Students upon their arrival at Auburn will report immediately to 

the President. No student will be admitted to a recitation in any 

class previous to matriculation. 

NUMBER OF EXERCISES REQUIRED. 

All students are required to have not less than fifteen recitations 
per week, or their equivalent, in addition to the exercises in labora- 
tory work, drawing and military drill. These additional exercises 
occupy not less than twelve hours per week and in all give twenty- 
seven to thirty hours per week required in college exercises. 

Special and Irregular Students. 

The privilege of electing studies in the lower classes is 
not granted to young students nor to their parents. The 



f 



-j 







j 



I 



1 1 
1 1 



. 



38 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



Faculty will assign a student on admission to that class of a 
prescribed course for which he is qualified ; and for special 
reasons, approved by the Faculty, he may be permitted to 
become irregular. 

Stfldents qualified to prosecute the studies of the junior 
class, and those over twenty-one years of age that are not 
candidates for a degree, are permitted to take, with the ad- 
vice of the Faculty, the subjects of study for which they may 
be qualified. 

Regular students who fail to pass satisfactory final examinations 
in any one study become special students. They will be classed as 
regular students pursuing a course for a degree, whenever they can 
pass the examinations in those subjects in which they were found 
deficient. 

Students, candidates for a degree, who are not in full standing in all 
the prescribed studies of a class, rank in the military department 
with that class in which they have the greatest number of studies, 
and their names are so placed in the catalogue. 

COUESES OF INSTRUCTION. 

The courses of study include the Physical, Chemical and 
Natural Sciences, with their applications ; Agriculture ; Biol- 
ogy; Mechanics, Astronomy, Mathematics, Drawing; Civil 
Electrical and Mechanical Engineering; Phvsiology and 
Veterinary Science; Pharmacy; English, French, German, 

a „ 1 ?T a|,flBi Hi8tor ^ Political Economy, Mental 
and Moral Sciences. 

These studies are arranged in regular courses so as to 
offer a liberal and practical education as a preparation for 
the active pursuits of life. 

JJ" 8 ; fi ! e de ^ e courses ^ undergraduates, each 
lead ng fc> the degree o Bachelor of Science (B. Sc.) and re- 
quiring four years for its completion : 

I. Course in Chemistry and Agriculture. 
Course in Civil Engineering 

§rrc^r c4L ™ ummm ^ ****** 

Course in Pharmacy. 

% 



ii. 
in. 

IV. 
V. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



39 



There are also two partial courses, each requiring two 
years for its completion : 

VI. Two-Year Course in Agriculture. 
VII. Two-Tear Course in Mechanic Arts. 

Course I includes theoretical and practical instruction in 
those branches that relate to chemistry and agriculture, and 
is especially adapted to those who propose to devote them- 
selves to agricultural and chemical pursuits. 

Course II includes the principles and applications of the 
sciences that directly relate to civil engineering, and is 
adapted to those who expect to enter that profession. 

Course III includes, besides the general principles and 
applications of the sciences, a special course in the applica- 
tions of electricity and mechanics, and is arranged for the 
profession of electrical and mechanical engineering. 

Course IV has been arranged to give a general and less 
technical education in subjects of science and language to 
meet the wants of those students who have selected no defi- 
nite vocation in life, as well as of those who propose ulti- 
mately to engage in teaching or in some commercial or 
manufacturing business. 

Course V includes, besides the general education of course 
IV in the lower classes, a special course in pharmacy and 
chemistry, and is adapted to those who expect to become 
pharmacists, manufacturing chemists, or to enter upon the 
study of medicine. 

Courses VI and VII have been arranged for the benefit of 
those students who, for reasons satisfactory to themselves, 
are unable to continue at college four years and to take one 
of the regular degree courses. 



A student who completes satisfactorily all the work of 
the senior class in a department, including the laboratory 
work, will be* awarded a certificate of proficiency \n said 

subject. 

No degree or certificate of proficiency will be given in any 
course unless the applicant has passed a satisfactory exam- 
ination in elementary English. 




207880 



1 



f 










40 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



Students who complete either of the two-year courses 
will, on passing a satisfactory examination, receive certifi- 
cates indicating their attainments. 

Those who have completed the general course in each de- 
partment of the school of mechanic arts, and are qualified, 
can enter upon a more extended technical course in mechan- 
ical engineering. 

COURSE IN MINING ENGINEERING. 

Students who have received the degree of B. Sc. in en- 
gineering, civil, or electrical and mechanical, or who have 
prosecuted an equivalent course of study, can enter upon a 
special course of mining engineering, which includes the fol- 
lowing subjects of study : 

Industrial Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry, Assaying, Re- 
duction of Ores, Mineralogy, Economic Geology, with prac- 
tical work in the field, Mining Machinery with the applica- 
tions of Steam and Electricity to the various operations 
connected with the exploitation of mines. 

The student, if a candidate for a degree, will also be re- 
quired to prosecute the necessary studies in that course of 
engineering in which he has not graduated. 

This course of study will be under thq charge of the pro- 
fessors of geology, chemistry, civil and electrical and 
mechanical engineering. 

SPECIAL ONE- YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 

Young men over twenty-one years of age who desire to study agri- 
culture will be permitted, without examination, to enter any class 
under the professor of agriculture, and, will be excused from reciting 
in any other class, fc\,m military duty, and from all other college 
duties ; but will be under the general college regulations, and will be 
required to have their time fully occupied. 

They may attend the lectures in agriculture in allthe classes and 
engage in the practical work at the experiment station, in the field 
stock-yard, dairy, garden, orchard, vineyard, etc., and may thus in 
one year, acquire valuable practical knowledge of scientific agricul- 
ture. 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 
LABORATORY INSTRUCTION. 



41 



Laboratory instruction constitutes an important feature 
in the courses of education provided for the-students of this 
College, and as far as possible all students are required to 
enter upon laboratory work in some one department.- 

Laboratory instruction and practical work are given in the 
following departments : 

I. Chemistry. 

II. Civil Engineering, Field Work, Surveying, Etc. 

III. Agriculture. 

IV. Botany. 

V. Mineralogy. 
VI. Biology. . 
VII. Technical Drawing. 
VIII. Mechanic Arts. 
IX. Physics. 

X. Electrical Engineering, 
XL Mechanical Engineering. , 
XII. Physiology and Veterinary Science. 

* 

XIII. Pharmacy. 

Note.— Special work in English or History may be taken by stu- 
dents in the general course as a substitute for laboratory work. 



s 



— """ 



42 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



I 



I.— COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate then umber of hours per week 



• 


FRESHMAN CLASS. 






First Term. 


Second Term. 


Third Term. 




5. English. 


5. English. 


5. English. 




2. History. 


2. History. 


3. History. 


- 


5. Mathematics. 


5. Mathematics, k 


5. Mathematics. 




3. Elementary Physics. 


3. Elementary Physics. 


2. Agriculture. , 




3. Drawing. 


3. Drawing. 


3. Drawing. 




6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 


6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 


6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 


,T ; ■■■' 


3. Military Drill. 


3. Military Drill. 


3. Military Drjll. 






SOPHOMORE CLASS 


• 




Fir *t Term. 


Second Term. 


Third Term. 


7 


3. English. 


3. English. 


3. English. 


/ 


3. History. 


3. History. 


3. Botany (a). 




5. Mathematics. 


5. Mathematics. 


5. Mathematics. 




3. General Chemistry. 


3. General Chemistry. 


3. General Chemistry. 


* 


2. Agriculture. 


2. Agriculture. 


2. Agriculture (b). 




8. Drawing. 


3. Drawing. 


3. Drawing. 




6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 


6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 


6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 




2. Physiology. 


2. Physiology. 


2. Physiology. 




3. Military Drill. 


3. Military Drill. 


3. Military Drill. 






JUNIOR CLASS. 


^ 

s 




First Term, 


Second Term, 


Third Term, 




3. English. 


3. English. 


3. English. 




3. Physics. 


3. Physics. 


3. Physics. 





4. Botany (Lab'y). 

1. Military Tactics. 
9. Chemical Lab'y. 

2. Veterinary Science. 

3. Military Drill. 

Third Term, 



3. Industrial Chemistry. 3. Industrial Chemistry. 3. Industrial Chemistry. 
2. Agriculture. 2. Agriculture. 2. Agriculture (b). 

4. Botany (Lab'y). 

1. M ilitary Tactics. 
9. Chemical Lab'y. 

2. Veterinary Science. 

3. Military Drill. 

SENIOR CLASS. 
Second Term. 
2. Political Economy (c).2. Political Economy. 

2. Mental Science. 2. Mental Science. 

2. Astronomy. 2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 2. Geology. 

5. Biology. 5. Biology. 

2. Agricultur'l Ch'm'try. 2. Agricultural Ch'm'try. 2. Agricultur'l Ch'm'try. 

1. Military Science. 1. Military Science. 2. Military Science. 
9. Chemical Lab'y. 9. Chemical Lab'y. 9. Chemical Lab'y. 

2. Veterinary Science. 2. Veterinary Scie nce. 2. Veterinary Science. 

(a) Begin 8 March 1st. 

(b) Also Practical Agriculture. 

(c) Begins Feb. 15th. > 



4. Botany (Lab'y). 

1. Military Tactics. 
9. Chemical Lab'y. 

2. Veterinary Science. 

3. Mjlitary Drill. 

First Term, 
2. English Literature. 
2. Mental Science. 
2. Physics. 
2. Geology „ 
5 Biology. 



, ■-, 



1 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 
IL— COUB8B IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 



43 



The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

- Second Term. 

5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 
8. Elementary Physics. 3. Elementary Physics. 
3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 
5. English. 
2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



Third Term. 
5. English. 
3. History. 
5. Mathematics. 

2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Second Term. 
3. English. 
3. History. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 
2. Agriculture (b). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 



Third Term. 
3. English. 
3. Botany (a). 
5. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 
2. Agriculture (b). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 



6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6- Mechanic Art Lab'y. 



3. Military Drill. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 
3. English, French, or 

German. 
3. Physics. 



3. Military Drill. 



3 



First Term. 
3. English. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 
3. Genera] Chemistry 
2. Agriculture (b). 

2. Physiolog.y. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

First Term. 
3. English, French, or 

German. 
3. Physics. 

5- Mathematics. N-^~-~fh Mathematics. 
5. Civil Engineering. 6f. Civil Engineering. 

5. Drawing. 6. 'Drawing. 
1. Military Tactics. 1. Military Tactics. 

6. Lab'y, Mech. Arts (c). 6. Lab'y, Mech. Arts (c) 6. Lab'y, Mech. Arts (c). 

1. Field Work, Engin'g. 2. Field Work, Engin'g. 2. Field Work, Engin'g. 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

First Term. Second Term. • Third Term. 

2. English Literature (d) 2. Political Economy (d)2. Political Economy (d). 
2. Physics. 2. Astronomy. 2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 2. Geology. 2. Geology. 

3. Vf athematics . 3. Mathematics. 3. Mathematics. 

(a) Begins March 1st. 

(b) For Agriculture may be substituted Physical Laboratory. 

(c) Or Mineralogy. 

(d) A For Eng. Lit. and Pol. Econ. may be substitutedJFrench or German. 



Third Term. 
English, French, or 
German. 
3. Physics. 
5. Mathematics. 
5. Civil Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 
I. Military Tactics. 






j 



™ 



* 



44 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



5. Civil Engineering. 5. Civil Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 5. Drawing. 

1. Military Science. 1. Military Science. 
4. Mech. Eng., Lab'y. 4. Mech. Eng., Lab'y. 
Field Work, Engin'g. Field Work, Engin'g. 



5. Civil Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 
1. Military Science. 
4. Mech. Eng., Lab'y. 
Field Work, Engin'g. 



III.— COURSE IN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL 

ENGINEERING. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 
In freshman and sophomore classes the same studies are prescribed 
as in Course II in Civil Engineering. 

JUNIOR CLAS8. 

First Term. Second Term. Third Term. 



3. English, French, or 3. 
German . 

3. Physics. 3. 

5. Mathematics. 5. 

4. Electrical Engin'g. 4. 

3. Mech. Engineering. 3. 

4. Mechanical Drawing. 4. 
4 Electrical Lab'y. 4. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 6. 
1. Military Tactics. "1. 
3. Military Drill. 3. 



First Term. 

2. Eng. Literature (a). 
2. Physics. 

2. Geology. 

3. Mathematics. 
5. Electrical Engin'g. 

5. Mech. Engineering. 
2.- Electrical Designing. 

6. ElectricakLab'y . 

4 . M ech . Eng. Lab'y . 
1. Military Science. 



2. 
2. 
2. 
3. 
3. 
5. 
2. 
6. 
4. 
1. 



English, French, or 3 

German. 

Physics. 3 

Mathematics. 5. 

Electrical Engin'g. 4 

Mech. Engineering. 3. 

Mechanical Drawing. 4. 

Electrical Lab'y . * 4 . 

Mech. Art Lab'y . 6. 

Military Tactics. 1. 

Military Drill. 3. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

Second Term . 
Political Economy (a).2 



Astronomy. 2. 

Geology. 2. 

Mathematics. 3. 

Electrical Engin'g. 5. 

Mech. Engineering. 5. 

Electrical Designing. 2. 

Electrical Lab'y. 6. 

Mech. Eng. Lab'y. 4. 

Military Science. 1. 

(a) French or German may be substituted. 



English, French, or 

German . 
Physics . 
Mathematics. 
Electrical Engin'g. 
Mech. Engineering. 
Mechanical Drawing. 
Electrical Lab'y. 
Mech. Art Lab'y. 
Military Tactics. 
Military Drill. 

Third Term. 

Political Economy (a). 
Astronomy. 
Geology . 
Mathematics. 
Electrical Engin'g. 
Mech. Engineering. 
Electrical Designing. 
Electrical Lab'y. 
Mech. Eng. Lab'y. 
Military Science. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



45 



IV.— GENEBAL COUESE. 



The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the n 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 



First Term. 

3. English 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 

6 Mech. Art Lab'y 

3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

5. Latin. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

First Term. 

3. English. 
3. Physics. 
3. Mathematics. 
3. French. 
3. German. 
3. Latin. 

1. Military Tactics. 

6. Lab'y WorMb). - 
3. Military Drill. 

First Term. 

2. English Literature. 
2. Mental Science. 

2. Physics. 

2. Geology. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1. Military Science. 
6. Lab'y Work (b). 



Second Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 

6 . Mech . Art Lab'y . 
3. Military Drill. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 

Second Term. 

5. Latin. 

3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 
3 . General Chemistry . 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 

3. English. 
3. Physics. 
3. Mathematics. 
3. French. 
3. German. 
3 . Latin . 

1, Military Tactics. • 
6. Lab'y Work (b). 
3. Military Drill. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 

2. Political Economy (c 
2. Mental Science. 
2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1. Military Science. 
6. Lab'y Work (b). 



umbers of hours per week 

Third Term. 

3. English. 
3. History. 
3. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 
3. Drawing. 

2. Agriculture. 

6. Mechanic Arts. 

3. Military Drill. 

Third Term, 

5. Latin. 

3. Botany (a). 

5. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
3: MiKtary Drill. 

Third Term. 

3. English. 
3. Physics. 
3. Mathematics. 
3. French. 
3. German. 
3. Latin. 

1. Military Tactics. 
6. Lab'y Work (b). 
3. Military Drill. 

Third Term . 

).2. Political Economy. 

2. Mental Science. 
2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1. Military Science. 
6. Lab'y Work (b). 




(a) Begins March 1st. 

(b) The student may elect the laboratory of any department for which 
he may be qualified. 

(c) Begins February 15th. 



I 



46 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 
V.-COUESE IN PHAEMACY. 



The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 






First Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 
3 Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 



First . Term. 

5. Latin. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

First Term, 

3. Physics. 

6. Chemical Lab'y. 

4. Botanical Lab'y. 
3. Pharmacy. 



Second Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Second Term. 

5. Latin. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 
Second Term. 

3. Physics. 

6. Chemical Lab'y. 

4. Botanical Lab'y. ^ 
3. Pharmacy. 



9. Pharmaceutical Lab'y.9. Pharmaceutical Lab. 
4. Pharmacognosy. 
1. Military Tactics. 
3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 



5. Biology. 
7. Toxicology. 
4. Pharmacy 



4. Pharmacognosy. 
1. Military Tactics. 
3-. Military Drill. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

Second' Term. 

5. Biology. 

6. Chemical Lab'y. 
4. Pharmacy. 



9. Pharmaceutical Lab'y.9 Pharmaceutical Lab'y 
4. Pharmacognosy. 4. Pharmacognosy. 

1. Military Science. 1. Military Science. 

3. Bacteriology. 3. Materia Medica. 



Third Term. 

3. English. 
3. History. 
3. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 
3. Drawing. 

2. Agriculture. / 

6. Mechanic Art&^ 

3. Military Drill. 

Third Term. 

5. Latin. 
3. Botany. 

5. Mathematics. 
3 General Chemistry. 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

Third Term. 

3. Physics. 
6. Chemical Lab'y. 

4. Botanical Lab'y. 

3. Pharmacy. 

9. Pharmaceutical Lab'y. 

4. .Pharmacognosy. 
1. Military Tactics. 

3. Military Drill. 

Third Term* 

5. Biology. 

6. Chemical Lab'y. 

4. Pharmacy. 

.9. Pharmaceutical Lab'y. 
4. Pharmacognosy. 
1. Military Science. 
3. Materia Medica. 



\ 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



47 



VI.— TWO-TEAR COURSE IN MECHANIC ARTS. 



First Term. _ 
5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic ArtLab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 
3. Drawing. 



\ 



FIRST YEAR. 

Second Term. 
. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

SECOND YEAR. 



Third Term . 
5. English. 
3. History. 
5. Mathematics. 

2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 



Second Term. 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 
5. Drawing. 



Third Term. 
3. English, 
5. Mathmatics. 
3. Physics. 
3. Drawing. 



12. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 12. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 12. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. ' 

VII.— TWO-YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 



First Term. 

5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 

3. Drawing. 

4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 



First Term." 

3. English. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

4. Agriculture. 
2. Physiology. 

2. Veterinary Science. 
12. Practical Agricult're. 

3. Military Drill. 

4 



FIRST YEAR. 

Second Term. 

5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary physics. 

3. Drawing. ) 

4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Second Term. 

3. English. 

5. Mathematics. 

3 General Chemistry. 

4. Agriculture. 
2 Physiology. 

2. Veterinary Science. 
12. Practical Agricult're. 

3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

5. English. 
3. History. 
5. Mathematics. 

2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 

4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

2. Practical Agriculture. 



Third Term. 

3. English. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

4. Agriculture. 
2. Physiology. 

2. Veterinary Science. 
12. Practical Agricult're 

3. Military Drill . 







SCHEDULE OF EXERCISES. 



HOURS 



I. 

8-9 



MONDAY 



4. Algebra. 
3. Latin. 



3. Physiology. 

4. Geometry. 
3. Latin. 
2. German. 

1. and 2 Drawing J 1 and 2 Drawing 

1. Elec.Engine'r'g 2. Botany. 

2. Mec.Engine'r'g 1. Mental Science 



TUESDAY 



1. Biology. 



" 



II. 
9-10 



III. 
10-11 



4. English. 

3. Chemistry. 

2. Civ. Engineer'g 

2. Latin. 

1. Calculus. 

1. Biology, 

2. Elec.Engine'r'g 



1. Elec.Engine'r'g 



WEDNESDAY 



4. Algebra. 
3. Latin. 

1 and 2 Drawing. 
1. Vet. Science. 
1. Elec.Engine'r'g 



THURSDAY 



4. History. 

3. Agriculture. 

2. Civ. Engineer'g 

2. Botany. 

1. Physics. 

1. Elec.Enginee'g 



3. English. 

2. Physics. 

1. German. 

1. Civ. Engine'r'g 

1. Biology. 

1. Mec.Engine'r'g 



4. English. 
3. Chemistry. 
2. Civ. Engineer'g 
2. Latin. 

1. Calculus. 

2. Vet. Science. 
2. Elec.Engine'r'g 



3. Physiology. 

4. Geometry. 
3. Latin. 

2. German. 

1 & 2 Drawing. 

2. Botany. 

1 . Mental Science 

1. Elec. Engin'r'g 



3. History (1,2). 

3. Botany (2, 3). 
1. Biology. 

1. Civ. Engineer'g 

4. English. 

1. Mec.Engine'r'g 

2. French. 



4. History. 
3. Agriculture. 
2. Civ. Engine'r'g 
2. Botany. 

1. Physics. 

2. Elec.Engine'r'g 



FRIDAY 



4-. Algebra. 
3. Latin.. 

1 and 2 Drawing. 
1. Veterinary Sci. 
I. Elec.Engine'r'g 



SATURDAY 



3. English. 

2. Physics. 

1. German^ 

1. Civ. Engine'r'g 

1. Biology. 

1 . Mech. Engin'r'g 



3. History (1,2). 

3. Botany (2, 3). 
1. Civ. Engineer'g 

4. English. 

1. Mech. Engin'r'g 

2. French. 



4. English. 
3. Chemistry. 
2. Civ. Engine'r'g 
2. Latin. 

1 . Calculus. 

2. Mech. Engin'r'g 
2. Vet. Science. 



3. English. 
2. Physics. 
1. German. 

1. Civ.Enginee'r'g 

4. History (3). 

1. Mec.Engine'r'g 



Exerc's in Elocution. 



Military Drill, 



Mechanic Arts. 
Chemical Laborat'ry. 
Electric'l Laborat'ry. 
Physical Laboratory. 
Veterinary Clinics. " 
Biologic'l Laborat'ry. 
Field Engineering. 



oo 



8 



a 

W 

2 

Q 

as 

3 



H 




■aw 



p^ 



HOU 




SCHEDULE OF EXEECISES— Continued. 



IV. 



11-12 



MONDAY 



4. Physics (1, 2). 



4. Agriculture (3) 
4. Latin (1,2). 

3. Drawing. 

2. Mathematics. 
2. Chemistry. 
1, English (1, 2). 
1. Pol. Econ.(2,3) 

4. Mechanic Arts 



V. 



12-1 



TUESDAY 



4. 

3. 

2. 
2. 
1. 

1. 



Latin. 
Drawing. 

Agriculture. r 
Mathematics. 
Chemistry. 
French. 



4. Physics (1, 2). 
4. Latin (3). 
3. History 1, 2) 

3. Botany (2, 3). 
. Mathematics. 

2. Chemistry. 
1. English (1-, 2). 
1. Political Econ- 
omy (2, 3). 

4. Mechanic Arts. 



4. Drawing. 

2. Mathematics. 

2. English'. 

4. Mechanic Arts 

1. Elec. Designi'g 

1. French. 



P.M. 



VI, VII 



2-4 



4. Mechanic Arts 



3. Mathematics, 
2. English. 
1. Geology. 



3. Mechanic Arts 
2. Mineralogy 

Laboratory 



3. Field W'rkAgr 
1 & 2 Laboratory 

Chemistry Military Drill (*) 
1 & 2 Field W'rk, ? 

Engineerings. Mech Lab'tory 
\ & 2 Mach. W'n£ Elec. Lab'y Work 



Elec. Lab. Work. 
Physical Labor'y. 



1 and 2 History. 



WEDNESDAY 



4. Latin. 

2. Agriculture. 

2. Mathematics. 
1. Chemistry. 

3. Physiology (3) 
1 . French. 



4. Drawing-. 

3. Mathematics. 

1. Latin. 

4. Mechanic Arts. 

2. Mec. Engin'r'g 
2. German. 

1. Elec.Designi'g 



4. Mechanic Arts. 

3. Field W'rkAgr 
1 & <2 Laboratory 
Chem. 
1 & 2 Field W'rk, 
• Engineering. 
1 & 2 Mach.Work 
Ex'cis. in Elocut'n 
Elec. Lab. Work 
Physical Labor'y 



THURSDAY 



4. Physics (1, 2). 

4. Agriculture (3) 
4. Latin 1, 2). 

3. Drawing. 

2. Mathematics. 
2. Chemistry. 

1. Military Sci. 

4. Mechanic Arts. 



3. Mathematics. 
2. English. 
1. Geology. 



3. Mechanic Arts. 

2. Mineralogy 
Laboratory. 

Military Drill (*). 

3. Mech. Labor'y. 
Elec. Lab. W'rk. 
1 and 2 History. 



FRIDAY 



4. Drawing. 

3. Mathematics. 

3. Latin. 

4. Mechanic Arts. 

1. Elec. Designing 

2. Milit'ry Tactics 



SATURDAY 



3. Mechanic Arts. 
Chemical Laborat'ry. 
Electric'l Laboratory. 
Physical Laboratory. 
Veterinary Clinics. 
Biological Laborat'y. 
Field Engineering. 



3. Mechanic Arts. 
Chemical Laborat'ry. 
Electric'l Laborat'ry. 
Physical Laboratory. 
Veterinary Clinics. 
Biological Laborat'y. 
Field Engineering. 



Chapel services daily at 7:45 a. in. 

Number prefixed denote classes— 1 denotes senior, 2 junior, etc. 

♦From 4:30 to 5:30 p. m. 



4-. Mechanic Arts. 

3. Field W'rk, Agr 
2. French. 
1 &2 Lab. Chem. 
I & 2 Field W'rk, 
Engineering. 
1 & 2 Mach. W'rk 
Ex'cis in Elocut'n 
Elec. Lab. Work. 
Physical Labor'y. 



Numbers afl&xed— (1), (2), (3),— denote terms. 



hj 



K 






0° 



^ 



I "II— lli I I 'I--' 



I 




DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION. 



•*♦* 



PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY. 






PRESIDENT BROUN. 

The instruction is given by recitations from text-books 
and lectures, illustrated by experiments. The first part of. 
the course is occupied with elementary rational mechanics, 
treated graphically. 

This is followed by a full discussion of molecular me- 
chanics ; while due prominence is given to principles, fre- 
quent reference is made to the applications of science. 

The studies of the junior class include the properties of mat- 
ter, units of measure, force, work, energy, kinematics, kinetics, 
mechanic powers, friction, pendulum, molecular forces of 
solids, liquids and gases, theory of undulations, heat, elec- 
tricity, magnetism, etc. 

The studies of the senior class include optics and 
astronomy. 

Post-graduate Course. This includes the study of ana- 
lytical mechanics, and requires a knowledge of differential 
and integral calculus. 

PHYSICAL LABORATORY. 

Instructor H. H. Kyser has charge of the classes in ele- 
mentary physics and of the physical laboratory. In ele- 
mentary physics the students are taught mechanics, solving 
problems by the elements of graphical statics, and are re- 
quired to do such work in ihe physical laboratory as is 
adapted to their attainments. A part of their time is given 
to learning practical telegraphy by the use of instruments 
provided for that purpose. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 51 

The physical laboratory is equipped with a number of instruments 
of foreign and American manufacture It contains a standard metre 
bar, a horizontal comparator, a Kater reversion pendulum, acatheto- 
meter with micrometer, a spectrometer furnished with prisms, crystal 
holder and flat diffraction grating, made by the Soci^te" Genevoise, a 
spectroscope by Browning, with a large amount of spectrum appa- 
ratus, Carre's ice machine, Becker's balances, a small dividing engine 
and a vertical comparator, both the latter made at the College in the 
laboratory of mechanic arts. There is also a large amount of minor 
apparatus, thermometers barometers, calorimeters and apparatus for 
experimentally determining the parallelogram of forces, for deter- 
mining rolling and sliding friction, torsion and flexure, specific grav- 
ity, etc. 

The student in this laboratory is required to ascertaiuexperi ment- 
ally various physical laws, h -nee in all exercises Wfere is something 
. to measure. From these measures he is required to find the law con- 
necting the quantities involved. Results of experiments are required 
to be entered, in tabular form, together with diagrams, etc., in a lab- 
oratory note-book. 



MATHEMATICS. 

PROP. SMITH. 

The general course for the first two years embraces the 
first year, algebra and geometry, six books; second year, 
solid geometry, plane and spherical trigonometry, surveying, 
mensuration. 

Two objects are sought to be attained : first, mental dis- 
cipline ; second, a thorough knowledge of the principles of 
pure mathematics and their practical applications. 

Theoretical and practical instruction is given to the 
sophomore class in farm, town and government land sur- 
veying, dividing land, mapping, plotting, and computing 
areas, etc. ; also in the theory, adjustment and use of instru- 
ments. 

The class, in sections of six or eight, devote three after- 
noons a week during the second and third terms to field 
practice. 




52 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



Mensuration includes an extended course in measurements 
of heights and distances, plane, rectilinear and curvilinear 
figures, surfaces and volumes. 

The completion of this course, common to all students, 
lays the foundation for the pure and applied mathematics 
of the mechanical and engineering courses. Analytical 
geometry, descriptive geometry, and calculus are pursued in 
the mechanical and engineering courses. Especial attention 
is given to their practical applications. 

During the entire course, instruction in text-books is sup- 
plemented by lectures. Solutions of original practical prob- 
lems are required of the student, to make him familiar with 
the application of the principles and formulas. 

Text-Books . 

Wentworth's Algebra, Wentworth's Geometry, Wentworth's Trigo- 
nometry and Surveying, Wentworth's Analytical Geometry, Faunce's 
Descriptive Geometry, Nicholson's Calculus, Johnson's Differential 
Equations, Osborne's Problems, Peck's Determinants. 



o 



GEOLOGY AND BOTANY. 



PROP. MELL. 



Geology.— This subject is studied in the senior class, and 
extends through the entire session. Special attention is 
given to the geology of Alabama, and many illustrations are 
drawn from the coal and iron fields and other natural de- 
posits of minerals in the State. The origin of ore deposits, 
mineral springs and geological relations of soils are carefully 
studied. 

There is also a course of advanced work in practical 
geology for post-graduate students. This subject is pursued 
by applicants for the degrees of master of science and mining 
engineer. 

The junior class in civil engineering studies mineralogy 
through the entire session. This work consists of a thor- 
ough course in blow-pipe analysis of the ordinary minerals, 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 53 

and lectures upon crystallography with instruction how to 
measure crystals and determine the physical constants of 
minerals. An effort is made to familiarize the student with 
all the economic ores and the rocks entering into the com- 
position of soils. C 

Botany. — The students of the sophomore class begin the 
study of botany the first of March and continue it through 
the session. Analytical work is made an important feature. 
This class is provided with plants from the fields, and taught 
how to determine their specific names. The work is suffi- 
ciently exhaustive to enable the student, after completing 
the course, to name any of the ordinary weeds and grasses 
that he will encounter in this section. 

In the junior class, in the eourse of chemistry and agri- 
culture, two terms are devoted to systematic and structural 
botany, and to advanced laboratory work with the micro- 
scope in the preparation of specimens showing plant struct- 
ure ; this work is sufficient to familiarize the students with 
the methods of plant building and cellular organization. 
Excellent microscopes of the most 1 improved patterns, and 
all necessary chemicals and apparatus for preparing and 
mounting vegetable tissues, are used by the students. 

The third term is devoted to the study of the physiology 
of plants in order to understand the functions of the various 
organs after completion of the work in the histological 
laboratory. 

FACILITIES FOR WORK. 

Geology.— -The department is equipped with models of Mount 
Shasta, the earthquake of 1887 in Japan, glass crystals for teaching 
crystallography ; charts and maps of the geology of America and 
Europe ; Colt's lantern complete with oil, oxy-hydrogen and auto- 
matic electric lamps ; a large assortment of fine lantern slides rep- 
resenting geological formations in this country and abroad ; well 
equipped mineralogical laboratory for thirty students, supplied 
with a collection of representative minerals ; and models of crystals. 

Botany.— The facilities for teaching this subject are as follows: 
Auzoux's clastic models of seeds and flowers ; a large collection of 
pressed plants of Alabama and other sections, mounted and cata- 
logued. There is also a laboratory for practical work in botany 



Y 




' 



54 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



equipped with slate-topped tables for twenty students; dissecting and 
compound microscopes by Zeiss, Leitz, and Bausch & Lomb; projec- 
tion microscopic apparatus ; microtomes by King and Bausch & Lomb ; 
all the necessary glass ware and smaller dissecting instruments 
required in a well equipped laboratory. The Zeiss compound micro- 
scope used by the professor for experiment work in connection with 
the station is supplied with Abbe's illuminating apparatus, slide 
changers, Abbe's camera lucida polarizers, apochromatic objectives 
(16 mm, 8 mm, 4 mm, and homogeneous immersion), oculars (2, 8, 8, 
12, 18 and photographic), eye-piece with micrometer. This labora- 
tory is well lighted with gas and electricity and with a good expos- 
ure for ample sunlight. 

In connection with the department there is a photographic dark 
room and an excellent photographic outfit consisting of cameras 
varying in size from 4 x 5 to 6}4 x 8% inches; Bausch & Lomb's pro- 
fessional photo-micro camera extending to eight feet; Zeiss's afiay 
stigmat photographic lens, Qy 2 x 8>£, fitted with Bausch & Lomb's dia- 
phragm shutter, and Zeiss's wide angle lens,6)£ x 8)£, all mounted 
in aluminium; Clark's lens fitted with diaphragm shutter; Darlot 
lens, 4x5; the accessory apparatus and chemicals required for first 
class work in photography. 

The sludents have access to the botanical garden where experi- 
ments in grass culture and many other plants of interest to the 
farmer are conducted by the professor. 

Text-Books. 

LeConte's Geology, Williams's Practical Geology, Tarr's Economic 
Geology, Dana's Mineralogy, Gray's Botany. Nelson's Herbarium and 
Plant Descriptions, Laboratory Guide, and notes of lectures. 






CIVIL ENGINEERING AND DRAWING. 

PROF. LANE. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

The special studies in this department begin in the junior 
class, and require a good knowledge of algebra, geometry, 
trigonometry and analytical mechanics. They are as fol- 
lows: 

Junior class— Simple, compound, reversed and parabolic 
curves, turnouts and crossings, leveling, gradients, setting 
slope stakes, etc. 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 55 

Special attention will be paid in this class to the location, 
reconstruction, drainage and maintenance of country roads; 
and the various pavements and foundations for the same. 

Senior class. — Classification, appearances, defects, season- 
ing, durability and preservation of timber; classification and 
description of natural building stones; bricks and concretes; 
cast and w rough t-iron, steel and other metals; limes, 
cements, mortars and their manufacture ; paints and other 
preservatives ; classification of strains and a general mathe- 
matical discussion of same; joints and fastenings; solid 
and open built beams; classification, construction and me- 
chanics of masonry; foundations on land and in water; 
bridges and roofs of different kinds ; their construction and 
strains determined mathematically and graphically; com- 
mon roads, their coverings, location and construction ; loca- 
tion and construction of railroads; navigable, irrigation, and 
drainage canals ; river and sea-coast improvements. 

Theory and practice are combined in both classes. 

Text-Books. 

Junior class. — Henck's Field Book for Railway Engineers and 
Byrne's Highway Construction. . \ 

Senior class. — Wheeler's Civil Engineering and Von Ott's Graphic 
Statics. 

DRAWING. 

All of the students of the freshman and sophomore classes 
are required to take drawing ; but only the students in civil 
engineering in the junior and senior classes. 

The freshman class is taught linear and free-hand draw- 
ing. The sophomore class is instructed in the principles of 
orthographic and isometric projections, shade and shadows, 
perspective and tinting. In the junior class the instruction 
embraces a more extended course in orthographic and iso- 
metric drawing, perspective, shades and tinting; also sketches 
of tools and machines, plans and elevations and cross-sec- 
tions of buildings, and blue prints. The senior class makes 
topographical drawings, and drawings of machines, roofs, 







56 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



bridges, etc., to different scales, and blue prints. Plans, 
profiles and sections of railroad surveys complete the in- 
struction in this department. 

Text- Books. 

» , 

Freshman class. — Kitchener's Geometrical Note Book, Thorne's 
Junior Course in Mechanical Drawing, and Davidson's Model Draw- 
ing- 

Sophomore class. — Davidson's Projections, Davidson's Practical 
Perspective, Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. 

Junior class. — Davidson's Building Construction, Davidson's Draw- 
ing for Mechanics and Engineers, Plates belonging to the College, 
Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. 

Senior class.— French, English and American plates belonging to 
the College, Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. 



J~ 



ENGLISH AND POLITICAL ECONOMY. 



■ 

Hi 



PROF. THACH. 



OBJECTS AND METHODS. 



In this department the students pursue a systematic 
course in the English language and literature. 

Language is the avenue of approach to all knowledge ; 
the interpretation of words is the fundamental process in 
education of whatsoever kind. A full course of English is, 
therefore, considered especially important in the technical 
courses of study that do not include the ancient classics. 
Accordingly, the course of English is continued throughout 
the four years of the College curriculum, three hours. a 
week, and is made obligatory upon all students, with the 
exception of those pursuing the first two years of the course 
in Latin. In this extended drill in the grammar and liter- 
ture of the English language, the endeavor is made to afford 
a training somewhat equivalent to the ordinary course in 
the classical language. ^5^ 

In view of the ill preparation in languages, especially in their 
mother tongue, exhibited by many of the candidates for admission to 
the freshman class, it is deemed advisable, for the sake of honest 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 57 

work, to devote a portion of the first year to grounding such students 
in the principles of grammar. 

Especial attention is given to the study of the writings, themselves, 
of leading English authors, since direct contact with literature is 
considered more profitable than information merely about literature. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

Freshman class. — Five hours a week ; study of grammar, the prin- 
ciples of special and general composition, with frequent brief papers 
illustrating the- laws studied ; study of American authors : Irving, 
Hawthorne, Holmes, Poe, Bryant, Longfellow.^ ■„ 

Lockwood- Whitney's English Grammar, Lock wood's Rhetoric, 
Kellogg & Reed's English Language. 

Sophomore class. — Three hours a week ; study of style, analysis of 
selections of prose and poetry, frequent essays on historic and liter- 
ary themes. v 

Genung's Rhetoric, Genung's Rhetorical Analysis, Syle's From 
Milton to Tennyson. 

Junior class. — Three hours a week ; lectures on the history of Eng- 
lish literature, critical study of English classics, essays. 

Pancoast's History of English Literature, Palgrave's Golden Treas- 
ury, Macaulay, Carlyle, DeQuincey. 

Senior ciass. — Two hours a week, first term. Principles of Criti- 
cism, Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, Hamlet, Dowden's Shakespeare, etc. 

ESSAYS AND ORATIONS. • < 

Theory without practice is as fruitless in the study of English as 
in any other department of study. Practical work is indispensable 
to the successful teaching of English. 

Besides numerous brief papers, illustrative of the subject matter 
of the text-books, set essays or orations are required of all students ; 
for the freshman class, ten essays a year ; ten for the sophomore ; for 
the senior and junior classes, three orations each. 

DECLAMATION. 

The old practice" of committing pieces to memory for "speaking" is 
cultivated as a means, both of training in the art of thinking on the 
feet, and of storing the mind with the diction of finished specimens 
of English style. 

The sophomore class is heard weekly throughout the year in sec- 
tions of ten, once for an hour and a half in rehearsal, afterwards in 
the study hall before the body of students. 

The senior and junior classes also deliver their orations in public. 



58 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



PHILOSOPHY AND POLITICAL ECONOMY. 

The entire senior class pursues the study of intellectual 
science, twice a week, through the year ; and political econ- 
omy twice a week, during the last two terms. The instruc- 
tion in this department is by lectures in combination with 
text-books. 

Intellectual Science.— -Psychology defined. Value in relation to 
moral culture, education, nnd Natural Sciences. The relations of the 
soul to matter. The arguments of the Materialist. Counter argu- 
ments. The Faculties of the Soul. The nature of Consciousness. 
Sense perception. Fancy. Imagination. Nature of Conceptions. 
Language. Judgment. Reasoning. Deduction. Induction, etc. 
Porter* 8 Intellectual Science. 

Political Economy. — Value ; production of wealth ; land ; labor ; cap- 
ital ; division of labor; distribution of wealth ; wages ; trades-union ; 
co-operation; money; credit; functions of government; taxation; 
tariff; education, etc. F. A. Walker's Advanced Political Economy, 
Lectures by Professor, 

A Post-graduate Course has also been established in English. The 
following courses have been given : 

(1) Shakespeare:— Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, Merchant of Venice, 
As You Like It, Henry IV, Part I, Richard III, King John. 

(2) Dry den— Poetical Works (Cnristie); Essay on Dramatic Poesy* 
(Thomas Arnold); Essay on Satire, etc., ( Y'onge) ; Saintsbury's Life 
of Dry den. 

Pope.— Poetical Works (Ward) ; Satires (Pattison) ; Stephen's Life of 
Pope, Gosse's From Shakespeare to Pope and 18th Century Literature. 

(3) English Literature of the Eighteenth Century : Addison, Pope, 
Gray, Goldsmith, Burns, Cowper, Bunke. 

(4) American Literature : Longfellow, Lowell, Poe. 



- « 



\s 



CHEMISTRY. 

PROF. B. B. ROSS. 

Instruction in this department embraces — 

1. A course of lectures in general chemistry. 

2. A course of lectures in industrial chemistry. 

3. A course of lectures in agricultural chemistry. 

4. Systematic laboratory work in connection with each 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 59 

course of lectures, for the practice of chemical analysis and 
chemical research. 

1. Course in general chemistry : This consists of a series 
of lectures (three per week) extending throughout the entire 
session, and includes a discussion of the fundamental prin- 
ciples'of chemical philosophy in connection with the history f 
preparation, properties and compounds of the metallic and 
non-metallic elements, with the main facts and principles of 
organic chemistry. In this course the more common "appli- 
cations of chemistry to the arts and manufactures are dis- 
cussed. The apparatus used for experimental illustration 
is extensive, containing the newest and most approved in- 
struments necessary for presenting the subject in the most 
attractive and instructive form. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

R^scoe & Schorlemmer, Fownes, Frankland, Remsen, Cooke's 
Chemical Philosophy, Chemical Journals. 

2. The lectures on industrial chemistry (three per week) 
extend throughout the session, and include a discussion in 
detail of the processes and chemical principles involved in 
the most important applications of chemistry in the arts and 
manufactures to the reduction of ores, the preparation of 
materials for food and drink, for clothing, shelter, illumina- 
tion, cleansing, purifying, writing, printing, etc. 

These lectures are amply illustrated by means of suitable 
specimens of raw materials and manufacturing products, 
together with models and diagrams. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Wagner's Chemical Technology, Muspratt's Chemistry as applied 
to Arts and Manufacturing, Ure's Dictionary, Watt's Dictionary, 
Richardson and Watt's Chemical Technology, Percy's Metallurgy, 
Sadtler's Industrial Organic Chemistry. 

3. Course in agricultural chemistry : This consists of 
lectures on chemistry in its applications to agriculture (two 
per week), and includes a thorough discussion of the origin, 
composition and classification^ soils, the composition and 



60 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



I 



growth of plants, the sources of plant food and how ob- 
tained, the improvement of soils, the manufacture and use 
of fertilizers, the chemical principles involved in the rota- 
tion of crops, the feeding of live stock, and the various 
operations carried on by the intelligent and successful 
agriculturist. 

REFERENCE ROOKS. 

Johnson's How Crops Grow and How Crops Feed, Lupton's Ele- 
mentary Principles of Scientific Agriculture, Johnson and Cameron's 
Elements of Agricultural Chemistry, Storer's Agriculture in relation 
to Chemistry, scientific journals, reports of the United States De- 
partment of Agriculture, and the bulletins and reports of the various 
home and foreign agricultural departments and stations. 

4. The course of systematic laboratory work: This 
course of practical work in the laboratory is carried on in 
connection with each course of lectures, and embraces the. 
practical operation of chemical analysis and synthesis, be- 
ing varied somewhat to suit the individual object of the 
student. 

The laboratories, which are open from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m., during six 
days in the week, are amply supplied with everything necessary for 
instruction in chemical manipulation, in the qualitative and quanti- 
tative analysis of soils, fertilizers, feed stuffs, sugar products, min- 
erals, mineral waters, technical products, etc., and in the method of 
prosecuting chemical researches. Unusual facilities are offered to 
students who wish to devote their time to the special study of prac- 
tical chemistry. 

Each student on entering the chemical laboratory is furnished 
with a work table, a set of re-agent bottles, and the common re- 
agents and apparatus used in qualitative and quantitative analysis 
At the close of the session he will be credited with such articles as 
may be returned in good order; the value of those which have been 
injured or destroyed will be deducted from the deposit. 

In addition to the analytical work above described, it is designed 
to give during the session a short course in electo- plating Practical 
instruction in the electro-deposition of nickel, silver, gold, etc upon 
other metals will be given, and, in addition, the applications of elec- 
trolysis to chemical analysis will be studied both theoretically and 
practically. J 



1 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



61 



Books Used. 

In qualitative analysis— Jones, Fresenius, Plattner. ^ 

In quantitative analysis— Fresenius, Sutton, Rose, Bunsen, Rick- 
ett's Notes on Assaying, Mitchell's Manual of Practical Assaying. 

In agricultural chemical analysis— Official methods of the Associa- 
tion of Agricultural Chemists. 

Wiley's Principles and Practice of Agricultural Analysis. 

CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

[For description of the building see page 16.] 

The chemical apparatus recently purchased for the laboratory con- 
sists of a full supply of the most approved instruments for practical 
work and investigation. The building is supplied with water and 
gas and every appliance required to meet the demands of modern 
scientific instruction and research. In addition to the apparatus 
usually supplied to first-class laboratories, there have been imported 
aMlew and improved Schmidt and Hensch's polariscope, four short- 
arm Becker Balances of latest pattern, Bunsen spectroscope, Zeiss 
microscope, and other instruments for delicate and accurate work. 



HISTORY AND LATIN. 



PROF. PETRIE. 



HISTORY. 

In this department the aim is not so much to memorize 
facts as to understand them. Strong emphasis is laid on 
the fact that history is not a succession of isolated facts but 
a progressive whole, each event being at once the cause and 
the effect of other events. The students are taught to 
investigate the growth of ideas and institutions, the rise 
and progress of great historical movements and the recip- 
rocal influences ot men and circumstances. Frequent use 
is made of diagrams, photographs, charts and maps, with 
which the department is well equipped. Constant prac- 
tice in map drawing is insisted on in order to give pre- 
cision to the geograpical knowledge required. Instruction 
is given by text-books, lectures and class discussion, but a 
constant effort is made to stimulate to wider reading and 
research in the library. 



f • 



62 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



In the freshman class, the subjects studied are the United 
States, Alabama, and England. The first term (two hours 
per week) is devoted to the history and government of the 
United States, the second term (two hours per week) to 
Alabama, and the third term (three hours per week) to the 
history of England. 

In the sophomore class (three hours per week until March$~~) 
the subject studied is general history. 

In the junior and senior classes opportunity for special historical 
work is given to those students of the general course who may elect 
it instead of laboratory work. The work in 1897-98 will be in Amer- 
ican history, social, political and economic. 

The work will be partly by lectures; but students will also investi- 
gate in the library under the direction of the professor topics con- 
nected with the lectures, and will report to the class the result of 
research. These reports will be made the basis of general discission. 
A series of lectures will be given from time on current foreign 
events. 

Text-Books. 

Freshman class.— Cooper, Estill & Lemmon's History of the United 
States, Thorpe & McCorvey's Civil Government in the United States 
and Alabama, Montgomery's English History. 

Sophomore class.— Myers's General History. 

Junior and 8enior classes.— Hart's Formation of the Union, Wood- 
row Wilson's Division and Reunion. 

LATIN. 

The objects kept in view in this department are : an ac- 
curate knowledge of the forms and syntax; a familiarity 
with Latin words, their etymology and their English 
derivatives ; an appreciation of Latin literature and an 
intelligent conception of Roman history and civilization 
both in themselves and in their effect on the modern world. 

A systematic course of instruction is given in the forms and in the 
syntax. These are taught both deductively from a grammar and 
inductively from the text read Translation is constantly practiced 
sometimes at sight, sometimes after being assigned for preparation! 
English passages based on a familiar author or illustrative of special 
constructions are put into Latin both orally and in writing. Great 
emphasis is laid on the etymology of the words in the text read 



¥ 



Alabama Polytechnic. Institute. 63 

In connection with every author studied in class a course of read- 
ing in English is prescribed descriptive of his life, work and times. 
The historical setting and the artistic value of his writings is care- 
fully discussed and frequent comparisons are made with modern 
authors) 

For the benefit of students who do not study the Latin language a 
series of popular lectures will be given upon the great Latin writers. 

Text-Books. » 

Freshman Class. — Grammar, Exercises, Nepos, Sallust. 

Sophomore Class.— -Cicero, Selections from Livy, Allen & Green- 
ough's Grammar, Exercises. 

Junior Class. — Virgil, Horace, A. & G/s Grammar, Exercises, Al- 
len's History of Rome, Wilkins's Roman Antiquities. 

Senior Class — Selections from Latin Authors, Wilkins's Latin Lit- 
erature, Ancient Classics for English Readers, Exercises. 



MODERN LANGUAGES. 

PROF. C. H. ROSS. 

The following regular courses are given in French and 
German : 

French — First Year: Three recitations a week. During 
this year the principal object is to acquire a thorough 
knowledge of the elements of grammar and a correct pro- 
nunciation, together with facility in translating ordinary 
French. Reading is begun at an early stage, and the. prin- 
ciples of grammar are illustrated and impressed by frequent 
exercises in rendering English into French. 

Second Year: Three recitations a week. During this 
year, almost the same line of work is pursued as that begun 
in the previous year. More difficult and varied French is 
read, and careful instruction is given upon the laws of gram- 
mar, the construction of the language, and the history of the 

literature. 

German — Two Years: Three recitations a week the first 
year, three p week the second year. In this course the aim 
and the methods are similar to those in French. 
5 



-t. 



j 






64 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



A post-graduate course in French has been offered, con- 
sisting of a study of the life and works of Moliere. 

Text-Books. 

French— First Year: Whitney's Brief French Grammar ; Joynes's 
Contes de F£es, Jules Verne's Michel Strogoff . 

Second Year: Hugo's Hernani, Dumas' Les Trois Mousquetaires ; 
French Prose Composition. 

Post-graduate Course: Le M£decin malgre* lui, Le Tartuffe, Les 
Pr^cieuses Ridicules, Les Femmes Savantes, La Malade Imaginaire ; 
Wells's Modern French Literature. 

German— First Year: Harris's German Lessons ; Super's Elemen- 
tary^German Reader, Grimm's Kinder- und Haus-Maerchen. 

Second Year: Scheffel's Der TrOmpeter von Saekkingen, Freytag's 
Doktor Luther, Hauff's Das Kalte Herz ; German Prose Compc 



•«.• 



» . 






■ 




/ 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

PROF. JfCKISSIGK. 



The students in this course will study English, French, or German, 
physics, mathematics, etc., as now prescribed for the course of civil engi- 
neering in the junior and senior years; and in addition thereto, will 
prosecute their studies in electricity and mechanics, as herein prescribed. 



m 



i 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 65 

COURSE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Four hours a week for the entire session are devoted to 
the studies of the principles of electricity and magnetism. 
The student is made familiar with the theoretical princi- 
ples by experiments, illustrations, recitations, and lectures. 

Laboratory Work. — Four hours per week are given to 
work in the laboratory. This includes management of 
batteries, construction of instruments, electro-plating, elec- 
trical measurements, verification of the principles upon 
which the measurements of current, electromotive force and 
resistance are based, etc. 

Text-Books. 

Ayrton's Practical Electricity, Desmond's Electricity for Engi- 
neers, Stewart and Gee's Practical Physics, Nichol's Laboratory Man- 
ual, Vol. I. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

In the senior year five hours per week are devoted to 
theoretical instruction in electricity and magnetism, sup- 
plemented by a course of lectures and practical demonstra- 
tions on the applications of electricity to lighting, electrical 
transmission of energy, electrical welding, etc. 

Encouragement is offered to advanced students for conducting 
original investigations, and opportunity is taken to stimulate a spirit 
of scientific inquiry. Courses of reading are suggested to such stu- 
dents in connection with their experimental work. 

Laboratory Work. — Six hours per week are devoted to 
practical laboratory work, including construction of instru- 
ments, electrical measurements, electrolysis, and relation of 
electrical currents to heat and mechanical work, care and 
tests of dynamo, the adjustment and calibration of voltmeters 
and ammeters, electric lighting, management and care of 
accumulators, energy consumed in lamps, adjustment and 
care of arc lamps, proper wiring of buildings, the applica- 
tion of electricity to street railways, magnetic measurements, 
tests of transformers and motors. 






■^ 



66 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 




PUN 



■>*o r**- 






I 



I 



SULCQF FLLT 



WfAMMK, fi 



<0 



=fl 



o 



• 



=& 





; 











\ht>lx toTlkh 



B 

c 

r 

G. 

I 
I 

V. 
If 

rJ 


t 

s 




K«t«-k Ct.CNC'nv r *A 

Cfv.e»«,t*\ -Vine tut.* HotoH. 

SooVoCT <jLtH£K\TOTV 
SfRlCS J)Vn\HO 

I**T*»mt.NT C\»t 
SwiTC.ll So\JM) 

St £ S(*. S fP \* v"Vii 

0«w "F»ctch 

^n>» * A TV to tu vj»x 





Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 67 

Drawing and Construction. — Two -hours per week in the 
senior year are devoted to the desigu and construction of 
electrical machinery. The student is required to make orig- 
inal designs of dynamos, motors, transformers, etc. 

* 

Text-Books. 

Thompson's Dynamo Electric Machinery, Fleming's Alternate Cur- 
rent Transformer, NichoFs Laboratory Manual, Vol. II. 

Reference Books. 

Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism, Vols. I and II, by Gordon ; 
Electricity and Magnetism, by Clerk Maxwell ; Emtage's Introduc- 
tion to the Mathematical Theory of Electricity and Magnetism; 
Kempe's Electrical Testing; Dredge's Electric Illumination, Vols. I 
and II; Dynamo Electric Machinery, by Carl Hering; the Electro 
Motor and its Applications, by Wetzler and Martin ; Electric Trans- 
mission, by Kapp; Electric Lighting, by Atkinson; Electric Light 
Installations, by Salomons; Alternating Currents of Electricity, by 
Blakesley ; London Electrician ; Proceedings of American Institute of 
Electrical Engineers ; Thompson's Electro-Magnet. 

EQUIPMENT. 

The electrical laboratory has a complete line of batteries, call-bells, 
annunciators, telegraph sounders, relays, keys, magnets, galvanome- 
ters, resistance boxes, electro-plating apparatus, and all apparatus 
for first year students in electrical engineering. The equipment com- 
prises many fine instruments of precision: Sir Wm. Thomson's 
standard 100 ampere balance (either for direct or alternating cur- 
rents) ; Sir Wm. Thomson's graded current galvanometer, reading 600 
amperes; also, his graded potential galvanometer, reading 600 volts; 
Weston alternating current voltmeter, Weston direct reading watt- 
meter, Queen's " Acme" testing set, Kelvin electrostatic voltmeter, 
Cardew voltmeter (for direct or alternating currents), reading to 150 
volts ; Weston's standard ammeter and voltmeter, box of resistance 
coils ; Queen's magnetic vane voltmeter, and ammeter, standard % 
micro-farad condenser and Sabine key ; Thompson watt-meter bal- 
listic reflecting galvanometer, mirror galvanometer, Fein ammeter 
and voltmeter, Ayrton & Perry ammeter, Edison ammeters, Kohl's 
solenoid ammeter, Wood ammeter, Deprez ammeter, Hartman & 
Braun voltmeter, D'Arsonval galvanometer, Hughe's induction bal- 
ance, tasimeter, microphone, telephones, electrolytic apparatus and 
several mirror and other galvanometers for first year students. 

In the dynamo room the following are installed: One Weston 150 
volt, 20 ampere dynamo, with rheostat ; one Brush 6 arc light dynamo, 




68 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



with regulator and six lamps; 'one Thomson-Houston 9 arc light 
dynamo with lamps; one Edison compound wound 12 kilo-watt gen- 
erator: a Thomson-Houston 110 volt, 75 ampere generator; two 
street car motors used as either direct or alternating current gener- 
ators or motors ; two polyphase induction motors ; one General Elec- 
tric 5 horse power induction motor ; General Electric 20 horse-power 
motor; Edison Z% kilo-watt generator; a Crocker-Wheeler one 
horse-power motor and rheostat, and one bi-phase alternator, and 
600 volt generator, made by special students, furnish current to lab- 
oratory, and light up the different buildings. 

The dynamos occupy a separate brick building, 50 x 32 feet, and 
are operated by a 35 horse-power Westinghouse vertical engine, and 
a 25 horse-power Atlas engine. 

This department, being provided with Sir Wm. Thomson's standard 
electrical instruments for exact measurements, will calibrate, free of 
expense, any ammeter or voltmeter that may be sent to the College. 

An electric motor made by students, supplied with current from a 
generator at a distance of 3,000 feet, operates a gin, gin press, ensi- 
lage cutter and feed cutter at the experiment station farm. This 
motor not only subserves a useful purpose in the operation of these 
machines, but is an excellent illustration of the electric transmission 
of power. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND MECHANIC 

ARTS. 



PROF. WILMORE. 
B. H. CRENSHAW, 



R. J. TRAMMF.LL, 



} 



ASSISTANTS. 



MECHANIC ARTS. 

The course in-manual training covers three years, as fol- 
lows: first year, wood- working— carpentry and turning; 

second year, pattern-making and foundry and forge work 

molding, casting and smithing ; third year, machine shop 
— chipping and filing and machine work in metals. 

•This course is obligatory upon the students of the three 
lower chisses^ For satisfactory reasons a student may be 
excused Trom this laboratory work by the Faculty. 

The full work of each class is six hours per week, in three 
exercises of two hours each. 



a. 




m 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



69 



The power for running the apparatus in this department is derived 
from a twenty-five horse power Harris-Corliss automatic engine, 
which is supplied with steam by a thirty horse-power steel horizontal 
tubular boiler. A steam pump and a heater for the feed water form 
a part of the steam apparatus. For the steam plant a substantial 
brick boiler-house and chimney have been erected. 

The equipment for the wood-working shop comprises the follow- 
ing: 30 wood-working benches, each with complete set of carpenter's 
tools; 24 turning-lathes, 10-inch swing, each with complete set of 
tools ; 1 double circular saw ; 1 band saw ; 1 board<-planing machine ; 
1 buzz planer ; 1 large pattern-maker's lathe, 16-inch swing ; 1 36- 
inch grindstone. In addition to these, the tool room is supplied with 
a variety of. extra hand-tools for special work. 

The equipment for the foundry consists of molding benches for 
18 students, each supplied with a complete set of molder's tools ; a 
23-inch Oolliau cupola, with all modern improvements, capable of 
melting 2,000 pounds of iron per hour ; a brass furnace in which can 
be melted 100 pounds of brass at a heat, with a set of crucible tongs, 
etc. Also a full supply of ladles, large and small moulding flasks, a 
foundry crane, special tools, etc. 

The forge shop equipment consists of 16 hand forges of new pattern, 
each with a set of smith's tools, anvil, etc. The blast for all the 
forges is supplied by a No. 3 Sturtevant steel pressure blower (which 
also furnishes blast for the foundry cupola), and a No. 15 Sturtevant 
exhaust blower draws the smoke from the fires into the smoke-flues 
and forces it out through the chimney. 

The machine department occupies a brick building, 30 x 50 feet, and 
is equipped with six engine-lathes (screw-cutting), 14-inch swing, 
6-foot bed; 2 engine-lathes, 16-inch swing (one with taper attach- 
ment) ; 1 engine-lathe, 18-inch swing, with compound rest and taper 
attachment; 1 screw-cutting lathe, 12-inch swing; 1 speed lathe, 10- 
inch swing; 1 20-inch drill press (power feed); 1 10-inch sensitive 
drill ; 1 15-inch shaper ; 1 22-inch x 22-inch x 5 feet planer ; 1 univer- 
sal milling machine; 1 corundum tool grinder ^4-inch wheel); 1 
bench grinder; 1 post drill press, 14-inch; 1 universal cutter and 
reamer grinder ; 1 Brown & Sharpe universal grinding machine ; 1 
power hack saw. A part of this room is set apart for vise-work, 
chipping and filing; and benches for 12 students are provided, each 
with vise and set of files, chisels, hammers, etc. In the tool-room is 
to be found a good supply of machinists' tools for general shop use, 
such as lathe and drill chucks, drills, reamers, taps, dies, gauges, 
files, cutting and measuring tools, and special appliances for machine 
work, with machine for grinding twist drills. 




70 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

The nature of the #ork in each department is as follows : 

First YeaV 

I. A course of carpentry or hand work covering the first two terms. 
The lessons include instruction in the nature ancT^use of tools, in- 
struction and practice in shop drawing, elementary work with plane, 
saw, chisel, different kinds of joints, timber-splices, cross joints, 
mortise and tenon, mitre and frame work, dovetail work, comprising 
different kinds of joints used in cabinet making, light cabinet work, 
examples in building, framing, roof-trusses, etc. 

II. A course in turning, extending through the third term. The 
lessons comprise, first, nature and use of lathe and tools, plain 
straight turning caliper work to different diameters and lengths, 
simple and compound curves, screw plate and chuck work, hollow 
and spherical turning. 

Second Year. 

I. A course in forge work in iron and steel, occupying the first 
term. The lessons are arranged so that the students, in making the 
series of objects, become familiar with the nature of the metals and 
the successive steps in working them by hand into simple and com- 
plex forms, as drawing, upsetting, bending, cutting, punching, weld- 
ing by various methods, tool-forging, tempering, hardening, etc. • 

II. A course in pattern-making covering the second term. The 
work includes a variety of examples of whole and split patterns, core 
work, etc., giving the students familiarity with the use of patterns 
for general molding. 

III. A course in molding and casting in iron and brass occupy- 
ing the third term. The work consists for the most part of small 
articles, such as light machine parts, but a sufficient variety of forms 
are introduced for the student to acquire a good general and practi- 
cal knowledge of the usual methods and appliances used in light 
foundry work. Most of the work is in green sand in two part flasks ; 
core work is also given, and some three part flask and some dry sand 
work is introduced: 

The same patterns which have been previously made by students 
are used, besides special patterns for occasional larger or more 
complicated work. Instruction and practice is given in working the 
cupola, each student in turn taking charge of a melting. 

In connection with this second year work, a series of lectures is 
given on the metallurgy and working of the metals used in the indus- 
trial arts, cast and wrought iron, steel, brass, etc. 

Third Year. 

I. A course of chipping and filing, covering the first term. The 
lessons comprise work on cast and wrought iron ; chipping to line on 
flat and curved surfaces, key-seating, etc. ; filing and finishing to line 




V 




I*- 



: c< 



CHIi 



ye 



1 



zi 



I 



P 0**Q 



o a I <* - 

• JM I,, | . . ii i f ■ ■ ^ 

; ' « I 4 

— — i" i — 1 5 B i — i 

q 

I 1 I 1 1 r 

o 

■ 

1 I 1 I 1 ° I 1 

© 





hi. 



Uj^hjo 
£ viu>> 



^SS^l F 



•ft 1 ** 



r«o QNkO*-Vt .4**0 



(Si- 



nn* 



M 



3 C 



Oh, 



y 



B-P"l 






r 



<j. 



— ■LH 



2i ■ 



D= 



Ld 

2 



10 



o 






0®. 



1 1 



u u l 



./- 



N 







x 




J 



> 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 71 

/ 

(straight and curved), surface filing and finishing, fitting, slotting, 
dovetail work, sawing, pin and screw filing, surface finishing with 
scraper, etc. 

II. Machine work occupying the remainder of the y-ear. The 
work includes cast and wrought iron, steel and brass; turning to 
various diameters and lengths, taper turning, facing with chuck and 
lace plate, drilling— both in lathe and drill press,— reaming, boring, 
screw-cutting in lathe and with taps and dies, planing, slotting, etc., 
with planer and shaper, milling various forms with the milling ma- 
chine, including exercises in making taps, reamers, etc., fitting, grind- 
ing, polishing, etc. 

Lectures are also given during the year on various subjects con- 
nected with machine work in metals: such as forms, construction and 
use of the various machines, cutting tools, gearing, gauges, screw 
threads, etc. During the last term some piece of construction work 
is given the classes. 

All of the work is done from blue prints made by the class in draw- 
ing. In the construction work, the student is given a blue print and 
the material for a certain part. He is then encouraged to study the 
work and plan the best method of doing it. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 
JUNIOR YEAB. 

Elementary Mechanics. — Three hours a week for the first 
term are devoted to this subject. The fundamental laws 
underlying all mechanical science and the mechanics of 
liquids, gases and vapors are studied. 

Principles of Mechanism. — Three recitations per week 
during the second and third terms are devoted to this 
subject 

Under this head machines are analyzed and their elementary com- 
binations of mechanism studied. The communication of motion by 
gear wheels, belts, cams, screws and link-work, the different ways of 
obtaining definite velocity ratios and definite changes of velocity, 
parallel motions and quick return motions as well as the designing 
of trains of mechanism for various purposes, together with the theo- 
retical forms of teeth for gear wheels to transmit the motion through 
these trains, are investigated under this subject. \ 

Mechanical Drawing .—During the first term the stuoents make 
drawings to exact scale, of some of the simpler machines. \fhe^ stu- 
dent takes his own measurements and makes his own sketches from 
which to make the finished drawing. 




72< 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



An elementary course of machine design is started art the beginning 
of the second term and continued till the end of the year. Some 
comparatively simple machine is selected and studied in all its de- 
tails. Careful attention is given to the strength of the parts and their 
mechanical arrangement with reference to facility of manufacture. 
An actual machine or the working drawings of a machine are ob- 
tained, the dimensions compared with those obtained by applying 
the theoretical formulas, and the causes of variation between the 
two studied. 

Laboratory Work,— The laboratory work will consist of hand work 
in iron and machine work in iron, as given in the course in mechanic 
arts in the third year. 

Text-Books. 

Wood's Elementary Mechanics; Stahl and Wood's Elementary 
Mechanism. - 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Steam Engine. — The first term five hours per week will be 
given to the study of the theory and efficiency of the steam 
engine, with discussions of the effects of condensation in 
cylinder, action of fly-wheels, effect of jacketing, etc. Sim- 
ple and compound engines, various valves and cut-off 
motions, and the principal types of modern engines are 
studied. Special attention is given to the steam engine 
indicator. 

Graphical Statics of Mechanism.— Five weeks of the second term, five 
hours per week, will be given to the study of this subject. The ad- 
vantage of graphical over analytical methods is generally recognized, 
and new applications of the former are constantly being made. By 
its use, the forces acting in every part of a machine may be deter- 
mined, both in direction and intensity, without the use of a mathe- 
matical formula. 

Steam Boilers.— The remainder of the second term is given to this 
-subject. The different forms of boilers, the different materials used, 
and the most approved methods of construction ; the various styles 
of boiler fittings; cause and prevention of foaming, incrustation 
and corrosion ; the best manner of setting and operating, are dis- 
cussed. * 

. Machine Design.— During the last term, the subject of machine de- 
sign will be studied in connection with the strength of materials, the 
latter being studied mainly from actual experiments made on the 
testing machine. 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 73 

Laboratory Work.— The students are not only taught how to cali- 
brate and use the different instruments, but they are brought in 
contact with engineering appliances under practical working con- 
ditions. 

Thoroughness of work is sought rather than the performance of a 
large number of experiments. 

The following course has been arranged : 

Calibration of steam gauge; calibration of indicator spring; cali- 
bration of thermometer; calibration of scales and balances; calori- 
meter tests with barrel, separating and throttling calorimeters ; boiler 
test with determination of the equality of steam and analysis of flue 
gas ; efficiency test of engine with brake and indicator power meas- 
urement ; test of hot air pumping engine; efficiency and duty of a 
steam pump; tensional, compressional and transverse tests of cast 
iron, wrought iron, steel and wood, in which are observed the limit 
of elasticity, the ultimate breaking strength and the modulus of 
elasticity. 

This class usually makes a test of some electric plant or mill some 
time in the last term. 

The apparatus for carrying on this work consists of a 25 horse- 
power Harris-Corliss engine, a 35 horse-power Westinghouse engine, 
a 25 horse-power Atlas engine, two 9 horse-power engines constructed 
by students in the shops, a small engine and boiler especially for 
making efficiency tests, a duplex Deane steam pump, an Ericsson hot 
air engine, a Westinghouse air pump, four steam engine indicators, a 
separating calorimeter, thermometer, pyrometers, scales, a standard 
steam gauge with apparatus for testing steam gauges, a Crosby dead 
weight tester for correcting the standard gauge, a 35,000-pound test- 
ing machine, .and Henning micrometer extensometer, a Carpenter 
calorimeter with auxiliary apparatus for determining the heating 
value of different fuels. 

Text-Books. 

Holmes's Steam Engine, Herrman-Smith's Graphica^tatics of 
Mechanism ; Unwin's Machine Design ; Wilson's Steam Boilers. 

Reference Books. 

The library contains a number of standard works on the various 
subjects studied, and the students are referred to them con- 
stantly for more extended treatment of many points that come up 
in class. 

POST-GRADUATE COURSE. 

The following course has been arranged and represents the amount 
of work required. Hydraulics may be substituted for thermodyn- 
amics if the members of the class are unanimous in wishing the 




V 



74 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



change. Other substitutions may be made at the option of the pro- 
fessor, provided they represent an equivalent amount of work, and 
are in the general line of the course selected. 

Dynamometers.— This includes dynamometers and the measurement 
of power. Absorption and transmission dynamometers are studied, 
with their application and use in testing steam engines. 

Valve Gears. — The different forms of valve gears of steam engines 
are studied, and problems in designing gears are worked out. 

Thermodynamics of the Steam Engine. — This subject is studied theo- 
retically and practically, and attempts a complete analysis of the lo- 
tion of steam in an engine. m ( 

Laboratory Work.— -As much advanced laboratory work will be given 
as can be arranged with the appliances at hand. 

Text-Books. 

Flather's Dynamometers and Measurement of Power, Spangler's 
Valve Gears, Peabody's Thermodynamics of the Steam Engine. 



AGKICULTUEE. 



, PROF. DUGGAR. 



Instruction in agriculture is given by means of lectures, 
text-books, bulletins of the agricultural experiment stations, 
and practical work in field, barn, and dairy. 

The study of agriculture begins with the freshman class 
in the third term, and extends through three terms of the 
sophomore year and two terms of the junior year. The 
time devoted to this study in the lecture room is two hours 
per week with each class. 

The subjects studied by the freshman class are the breeds 
of horses, cattle, sheep, and hogs,— their characteristics, 
uses, management and adaptability to the South. Practical 
work in judging live-stock is included in the course. 

The first term of the sophomore year is devoted to dairy- 
ing and to a study of the principles of live-stock breedings 
Dairying will be taught by practical work in the dairy,— 
butter making, determination of fat in milk by the Babcock 
method, etc.,— as well as by instruction in the lecture room>^ 

In the second term of the sophomore year the following 



mtmmm t tmm 



L 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 75 

subjects are studied: soils — chemical and physical prop- 
erties, defects, and means of improvement; the control of 
water, including means of conserving moisture in times of 
drought, terracing, underdrainage, and open and hillside 
ditches; objects and methods of cultivation; agricultural 
implements; rotation of crops; and improvement of plants 
by crossing, selection, and culture. 

The third term of the sophomore year is devoted to the 
staple crops produced in Alabama, to forage plants adapted 
to the South, and to plants valuable for the renovation of 
soils. The more important crops are treated with refer- 
ence to varieties, soil and fertilizer requirements, methods 
of planting and cultivating, and uses. 

In the junior year the subjects of feeding animals and of 
farm management are studied. Among the topics included 
under the latter heading are different systems of farming 
and stock growing, farm equipment and buildings, silos and 
silage, care of farm manures, composting, choice and meth- 
ods of applying commercial fertilizers for different crops 
and soils, and economical methods of improving exhausted 
soils. 

In every class the student is encouraged to independent thought 
on agricultural problems rather than to depend on "rules of thumb, '' 
so that he may be prepared to adapt his practice in after years to 
changed conditions of soil, climate, capital, market, etc. The suc- 
cessful farmer must be a thinker rather than a blind follower of in- 
flexible rules. 

The effort is made to keep before the student the difference be- 
tween the widely applicable principles on which every rational system 
of farming rests and details that vary with changing conditions. The 
conditions of soil, climate, etc., prevailing in different parts of Ala- 
bama are kept constantly in view. 

As far as limited time allows, attention is directed to agricultural 
literature now accumulating so rapidly in this and in foreign coun- 
tries, to the end that in future years the student may know where 
and how to seek the information that he may need. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Horses, Cattle, Sheep, and Swine, by Curtis ; American Dairying, 
by Gurler ; Dairyman's Manual, by Stewart ; Soils and Crops of the 



76 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

Farm, by Morrow & Hunt; Muir's Agriculture; Corn Culture, by 
Plumb; The Soil, by King; Manures and the Principles of Manuring, 
by Aikman ; Drainage for Profit and Health, by Waring; Agriculture 
in some of its Relations with Chemistry, by Storer ; Manual of Cattle 
Feeding, by Armsby ; Stock Breeding, by Miles; Hand-book of Ex- 
periment Station Work; and .selected publications of the various 
divisions of the U. S. Department of Agriculture, and of the agricul- 
tural experiment stations. 

Applicants for post-graduate work in agriculture will be assigned 
special research work and aided in the line of investigation deemed 
best for each individual student. 



BIOLOGY AND HOBTICULTURE. 



PROJF. EARLE. 




The subject of biology is required of the senior class in 
the courses of chemistry and agriculture, and of phar- 
macy. It occupies five hours a week for the three terms of 
the senior year. The work in this department will be 
largely confined to the study of the lower forms of plant 1 

life and to vegetable physiology, or the study of plants as 1 

as living beings. Under the first head special attention 
will be given to the bacteria and other disease producing 
organisms of man and the higher animals; and to the par- 
asitic fungi that cause diseases of plants. Under vegetable 
physiology those problems that explain the foundation for 
correct agriculture practices will be made most prominent. 
This will include the germination of seeds, the food and 
nutrition of plants, the circulation of the sap, the processes 
of reproduction, plant variability, etc. 

The instruction will be by text-book, supplemented by lectures and 
by practical laboratory work. 

The students will be required to make careful microscopic draw- 
ings of objects studied. They will also collect material in the fields 
and determine it so far as their instruction will admit. 

The equipment for instruction in this department comprises, be- 
sides a sufficient lecture room, a students' laboratory and two small 
glass rooms for cultural and bacteriological work. These are supplied 
with water, gas and all necessary appliances for thorough primary 



I 



__ 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



77 



and advanced work, including compound and dissecting microscopes 
for each student, microtomes, paraffipe baths, incubators, steam and 
dry sterilizers, instantaneous water heaters, Pasteur filter, chemical 
and common balances, set of BrendePs models of parisitic and other 
fungi, besides a large and well selected stock of glassware staining 
fluids, chemical re-agents, culture media, etc. 

In the private office of the department, which is fitted up as a 
special laboratory for the use of the professor in charge, is located a 
good reference library and the scientific collections of the depart- 
ment. At present these consist of about 10,000 named specimens of 
fungi, and other material is being rapidly accumulated, not only of 
fungi, but of the other groups of cryptogams as well. These books 
and collections are accessible to the students, and constitute, with 
the other resources mentioned, a superior equipment for advanced 
biological instruction. 

HORTICULTURE. 

At present special horticultural instruction is confined to 
the spring term of the junior year in the course of chemis- 
try and agriculture, and to some practical work and "field 
lectures" to the students of the same course during the 
sophomore year. Instruction is given by lectures and by 
courses of reading, using the green house and orchards and 
gardens of the experiment station to give practical illustra- 
tions of the subjects taugbt. 

Attention is called to the various fruits and vegetables that can be 
successfully cultivated in Alabama, and methods of propagation, cul- 
tivation and marketing are discussed. Particular attention is called 
to the diseases and insect enemies to which each of these crops are 
liable, and careful directions are given as to the best known means 
of combatting them. The construction and management of green 
houses, hot beds and cold frames receive special attention, while 
such topics as floriculture, landscape gardening and forestry are dis- 
cussed in a general way only. 

- Special work will be arranged for any special students desiring to 
take a more extended course in horticulture. 



78 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS. 

LIEUT. M. 0. HOLLIS, U. S. A., COMMANDANT. 

Military science and tactics are required by law to be 
taught in this institution. The law is faithfully carried out 
by imparting to each student, not physically incapacitated 
to bear arms, practical instruction inline school of the 
soldier, of the company and of the battalion in close and 
extended order, also in guard mountings, inspections, dress 
parades, reviews, etc. 

Under section 1225, U. S. Revise! Statutes, the College is 
provided with modern cadet rifles and accoutrements and 
two pieces of field artillery. Ammunition for practice firing 
is used under the direction of an experienced officer. The 
exercises in target practice and artillery drill begin the first 
day of the third term. 

The following uniform of standard cadet gray cloth has 
been prescribed for dress: Coat and pants as worn at 
West Point, with sack coat for fatigue, dark blue cadet cap. 
A neat and serviceable uniform can be obtained here at $14 
to $15 This is less expensive than the usual clothing. 
All students are required tc 7 wear this uniform during the 
session. 

The entire body of students is divided into companies. 
The officers are selected for military efficiency, good con- 
duct, and scholarship. The commissioned officers will be 
selected either from the senior or junior classes, and promo- 
tion will depend on merit and not wholly on seniority. 

A student who has once accepted an office cannot resign it except 
for reasons entirely satisfactory to the President and Commandant^ 
The resignation of his office by a minor will usually not be considered 
without first placing all the circumstances of the case before his pa- 
rent or guardian. 

Candidates for appointment or promotion may be required to stand 
an examination. Moral fitness, including demerits, will be con- 
sidered. 

Examinations will be conducted by a Board of Officers, to be com- 
posed of the Commandant of Cadets and two commissioned officers, 
to be designated by him. The proceedings of the Board are subject 
to revision and approval by the President of the College. 




^s 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. .79 

Each company is officered by one captain, two first lieu- 
tenants, one second lieutenant, and with a proper number of 
non-commissioned officers. The officers and non-commis- 
sioned officers are distinguished by appropriate insignia of 
rank. These appointments are confirmed by the President 
on nomination of the Commandant. 

The junior class recites once a week in the United States 
Infantry Tactics. 

The senior class recites once a week in "Notes on Mili- 
tary Science." 

On the graduation of each class the names of such students as have 
shown special aptitude for military service will be reported to the 
Adjutant- General of the U. S. Army, and the names of the three 
most distinguished in military science and tactics will be inserted in 
the U. S. Army Register, and published in general orders from head- 
quarters of the army. 



PHYSIOLOGY AND VETERINARY SCIENCE. . 

PROF. CARY. 
PHYSIOLOGY. 

The s6phomore class during the entire college year 
studies human physiology. 

It is the aim of the department to familiarize the student 
with the gross anatomy and the functions of the various 
parts of the human body; moreover, due attention is given 
to the laws of health or conditions most favorable to a 
healthy action of the organs of the human body. 

Instruction is given by lectures, which are illustrated by 
charts, drawings, models of the organs of the body and by 
a human skeleton. 

The department is now supplied witji rooms where the 
students can dissect some of the smaller animals and thus 
see the organs, tissues and regions as exhibited in a few of 
the lower animals. 



6 



80 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



VETERINABY SCIENCE AND ART. 

During the entire junior and senior years the students in 
the agricultural and chemical course of study devote to this 
work two hours per week in the class room and three to five 
hours per week in clinical practice. 

The senior class in pharmacy devotes four hours per week, during 
the first term, to the study of bacteriology in the class room and 
laboratory ; and three hours per week in the study of therapeutics 
during the second and third terms. 

The lectures are arranged with special reference to the 
students who are interested in horses or other domestic 
animals ; also to those students who contemplate studying 
human or veterinary medicine- While it is not the aim to 
give a complete course in veterinary medicine, we attempt 
to present the general principles of comparative medicine 
with such special applications as are adapted to tjie condi* 
tions and wants of the students. 




Bu/LDfNG 




= 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 81 

Special attention is given to the 'exterior anatomy of the horse, 
while comparative anatomy is presented mainly in connection with 
the study of the diseases of the different apparatus of the horse or 
other domestic animals. 

Lameness in the horse, minor surgery, the actions and uses of the 
most common medicines, the principles and practice of comparative 
medicine, the methods of meat inspection, and the ways of protect- 
ing the health of man and domestic animals, are considered in as 
plain and practical a manner as the time allotted to each subject will 
permit. Post mortem examinations and the dissection of domestic 
animals are used as object lessons in the study of general pathology 
and anatomy. 

To the post-graduate student this department furnishes 
work in histology, bacteriology, pathology, and meat and 
milk inspection. 

The department of physiology and veterinary science is now loca- 
ted in a new building which consists of a two-story portion, contain- 
ing four laboratory rooms on the second floor and a lecture room, 
museum and office on the lower floor; and a one-story part, which 
contains an operating room. 

The building is supplied with water and gas, and the laboratory is 
now equipped for work. The museum contains the skeletons of the 
hOrse, the ox, the sheep, and the hog, and a human skeleton. It also 
contains anatomical models of the various parts and organs of the 
human body and models of many parts of the horse, the ox and the 
other domestic animals. It also contains a collection of pathological 
and anatomical specimens, and one of animal parasites. 

A new veterinary hospital building has just been completed; it 
contains five large box stalls, four open single stalls, an office and a 
feed room, on the lower floor; the upper floor is used as a storage 
room for hay, fodder, etc. The hospital is supplied with fresh water. 

The cases for clinical work have been numerous. During 1896 
there were five hundred and sixty cases handled by the depart- 
ment. 



PHARMACY AND PHARMACOGNOSY. 

PROF. MILLER. 
JUNIOR YEAR. 

Pharmacy. — Class work, three hours a week. The different 
systems of weights and measures. Specific gravity. Phar- 
maceutical problems. The fundamental operations in phar- 



82 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



macy. Apparatus used in pharmaceutical processes. Dis- 
cussion of all classes of pharmaceutical preparations. 

Laboratory, nine hours a week. Preparation of official 
and non-official galenicals. 

Pharmacognosy. — Class work with laboratory work, four 
hours a week. All official vegetable drugs studied with aid 
of simple and compound microscope. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Pharmacy. — Class work, four hours a week. Official and 
non-official pharmaceutical chemicals, inorganic and organic, 
including the more important newer remedies. The pre- 
scription. Incompatibilities. Doses. 

Laboratory, nine hours a week. Preparation of official 
and non-official pharmaceutical chemicals, inorganic and or- 
ganic. Pharmaceutical testing by pharmacopceial methods. 
Drug assaying, special attention given to compounding of 
prescriptions. 

Pharmacognosy. — Class work with laboratory work, four 
hours a week. Study of important non-official vegetable ' 
drugs; of drugs of animal origin ; of adulterants and worth- 
less drugs. Practical exercises in identification of pharma- 
ceutical preparations and chemicals. 

The practical work in pharmacy includes the manufacture of not * ^ 
less than two hundred pharmaceutical preparations and the com- 
pounding of not less than fifty prescriptions. 

The work in pharmacognosy includes the study of more than three 
hundred drugs, each of which the student is required to recognize by 
its physical and chemical properties, giving Latin name, common 
name, origin, habitat, constituents, medicinal action and dose. 




ZOOLOGY. 



PROF. BAKER. 



This department is prepared to offer instruction in the 
more important subjects relating to animal life. For the 
present especial attention will be paid to entomology, dis- 
cussing useful and injurious insects in their relations to 
agriculture. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 83 

Instruction is offered under four heads : 

(1) General Morphology, (2) Embryology, (3) Taxonomy, 
and (4) Interrelations of Plants and Animals. 

The entire course for a post-graduate degree will cover 
the work of four full terms. At present, in the course of 
agriculture, a portion, amounting to one term's work, is re- 
quired for a degree. 

(1) General Morphology, Under this head is included a study of 
the anatomy and physiology of types of each of the great groups of 
animals. The guides in this work, which is all done at the laboratory 
table, will be Huxley's Crayfish, Huxley and Martin's Practical Biol- 
ogy, and Parker's Zootomy. 

(2) Embryology. For work in embryology the department is well 
equipped, possessing incubators, microtome, the best microscopes, 
and all necessary re-agents. Students taking embryology will be en- 
gaged largely with the development of the chick, using Foster and 
Balfour's Elements. 

(3) Taxonomy. The principles of taxonomy will be taught en- 
tirely by the laboratory method. Some work will be done in each of 
the greater groups, dissecting and classifying many of the common 
animal forms. In this subject there will be used the College collec- 
tion of periodicals and special works, together with the private library 
of special papers and monographs of the professor. The private 
zoological collections of the professor, now in the entomological 
laboratory, containing a large number of specimens, will be at the 
service of students. 

(4) Interrelations of Plants and Animals. It is through the close 
relations existing between the plant and animal worlds, that the 
latter has so important an influence on agricultural and other inter- 
ests. This subject will be taught almost entirely by field work, the 
facts being brought out by the students themselves through observa- 
tion and experiment. A consideration of the subject in general will 
be followed by a study of the various insects injurious to field and 
garden crops. Beneficial species will also be considered, especial at- 
tention being given to the subject of the influence of insects in the 
pollination and cross fertilization of plants. The field investigations 
will be supplemented by lectures. 

The department has a most exceptional outfit for thorough general 
work. It has, in connection with the department of horticulture 
and mycology, a lecture room and students' laboratory, the latter 
being a large, well-lighted room, provided with water, gas, slate- 
topped tables, and fully equipped with microscopes, reagents, and all - 
other apparatus necessary in a study of general zoology. It has also 
a well equipped entomological laboratory and a costly experimental 
plant house in connection therewith. 



$ 



84 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



POST-GRADUATE DEGREES. 

The post- graduate degrees are— Master of Science, Mining 
Engineer,. Civil Engineer, Electrical and Mechanical 
. Engineer, ^nd Pharmaceutical Chemist. 

A post-graduate degree may be obtained by a graduate of 
thiSfCollege, or of any other institution of equal grade, by 
one year's residence at the College, spent in the successful 
prosecution of a course of study approved by the Faculty. 

Candidates must also present to the Faculty a satisfactory thesis, 
showing independent investigation upon some subject pertaining to 
their course, and must pass an examination at the close of each term 
on the course of study prescribed, in which he must attain a grade of 
75 per cent. The examination is written, and also oral in the pres- 
ence of the Faculty. . 

The subject of the thesis must be submitted to the Faculty rbr ap- 
proval prior to January 1st, and be given to the professor by 
May 1st. 

Applicants for post-graduate degrees are, by order of the Trustees, 
permitted to matriculate without payment of fees. 

They are subject to the general regulations as other students, but 
are exempt from all military duty. 

Resident graduates that are not candidates for a degree, are per- 
mitted to matriculate and prosecute the studies in any department 
of the College, without payment of regular fees. 

The following courses are prescribed for the degrees named : 

Mining Engineer.— For course of study for this degree, see page 40. 

Civil Engineer.— Civil Engineering, Mathematics, Analytical Me- 
chanics. 

Electrical and Mechanical Engineer. — Electrical Engineering, Me- 
chanical Engineering. 

Pharmaceutical Chemist. — Pharmacy and Chemistry. 

Master of Science.— Studies in three departments, in two of which 
the candidate must have previously completed the full course of the 
senior class. 

A certificate of proficiency will be given when any one subject of 
a post-graduate course is satisfactorily completed. 

' DISTINCTIONS. 

Distinctions are awarded in the different subjects of each class to 
those students whose grade for the entire year is above ninety 
per cent. 

Certificates of Distinction are awarded in public on commencement 
day to those who^ obtain an average of 90 per cent, in all the pre- 
scribed studies of a regular class ; and also to those who obtain three 
distinctions in the freshman class, four in the sophomore class, five 





-f .— 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



85 



■* * 



£-**• 



in tnel junior class, and six In the senior class, provided they have 
satisfactorily passed all the regular examinations of that session, and 
have not received forty demerits during the year. 

A distinction is not given in the senior class if the average grade in 
any one subject is less than 75 per cent. 

PHOTOGRAPHY. 

During the session there will be given by Professor Mell a course 
of twelve lectures on photography. This course will be elective, and 
the instruction will be open to any student that may desire to learn 
how to make pictures. It will be necessary for each student to pro- 
vide himself with an outfit that will cost from $11.50 to $16.00. 

RECORDS AND CIRCULARS. 

Daily records of the various exercises of the classes are kept by 
the officers of instruction. 

From the records a monthly circular, or statement, is sent to the 
parent or guardian. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Written monthly examinations on the studies of the month are 
held by each professor. 

At the end of each term written examinations, or written and oral, 
are held on the studies passed over during that term. 

Special examinations are held only by order of the Faculty, and in 
no case will private examinations be permitted. 

Students falling below the minimum grade at the final examina- 
tions, can be promoted to full standing in the next higher class only 
on satisfactory examinations at the opening of the next session. 

It is required that every student who enters the College shall re- 
main through the examinations at the end of the term. Leaves of 
absence and honorable discharges will, therefore, not be granted 
within three weeks of the examination, except in extreme cases. 

LIBRARY. 

The library occupies an elegant, well-lighted room in the main 
building, and also two smaller adjacent rooms. It contains over 
9,000 bound volumes, including valuable reference and scientific 
books, with select editions of standard authors, and others suitable 
for students, carefully and recently selected. It is kept open eight 
hours daily for the use of students as a reading-room, and is thus 
made an important educational feature. 

MUSEUM. 

The museum occupies a large room in the third story. It is pro- 
vided with suitable cases and is equipped with valuable specimens 
and models of an instructive character. 




86 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



-/ 




DISCIPLINE. _/ 

The government of the College is administered by the President 
and Faculty, in accordance with the code of laws and regulations en- 
acted by the Trustees. 

Attention to study and punctuality in attendance on recitations 
and all other duties, are required of every student. Students are 
prohibited from having in their possession arms or weapons not 
issued for the performance of military duty, and also from using, or 
causing to be brought into the College limits, intoxicating liquors. 

MILITARY DRILL. 

There are three regular military drills each week, and all under- 
graduate students, not physically incapacitated to bear arms, are re- 
quired to engage in these exercises. 

The drills are short, and the duty involves no hardships. The 
military drill is a health-giving exercise, and its good effects in the 
development of the physique and improvement of the carriage of the 
cadet are manifest. 

Privates of the senior class who are candidates for graduation may 
be excused by the President from all military drills, and also 
students over twenty-one years of age at the time of entering Col- 
lege that are permitted to devote their time to one special study, as 
chemistry, agriculture, etc. v 

RELIGIOUS SERVICE. 

Religious services are held every morning in the chapel. 

All students are required to attend these exercises, and also to at- 
tend the church of their choice at least once on Sunday. 

Opportunities are also offered for attending Bible classes every 
Sunday. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

This Association is regularly organized, and through its weekly 
meetings exerts a wholesome Christian influence among the students 
of the College. 

Students are advised to unite with the Association when they 
enter College. 
The following are the officers : 

W. J. Bieson, President. 
*• S. T. Slaton, Vice-President. 

W. H. MoBryde, Corresponding Secretary. 
J. W. King, Recording Secretary. 
John Puripoy, Treasurer. 

LOCATION. 

The College is situated in the town of Auburn, fifty-nine miles east 
of Montgomery, on the line of the Western Railroad. 



«* 



1 




< 






• 



^^^^■H* 



'N 



*M 



v 



•% 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 87 

The region is high and healthful, noted for its general good health 
and freedom from malaria, having an elevation of eight hundred and 
twenty-six feet above tide water. By statute of the State, the sale 
of spirituous liquors and keeping saloons of any kind are forbidden. 

BOARDING. ' 

The College has no barracks or dormitories, and the students 
board with families in the town of Auburn and thus enjoy all the 
protecting and beneficiab influence of the family circle. 

For each house an inspector is appointed, whose duty it is to re- 
port those who, without permission, leave their rooms after "call to 
quarters/' or are guilty of any violation of order. The report of the 
inspector is made to the Commandant on alternate days of the week. 

Students, after selecting their boarding-houses, are not permitted 
to make changes without obtaining permission from the President, 
and this permission is given only at the close of a term, except for 
special reasons. 

. By special arrangement with the College authorities, Mrs. M. L. 
Mitchell and Mrs. A DeBardeleben will accommodate students with 
board, lodging, fuel, etc., for $9.50 per month. 

EXPENSES. 

There is no charge for tuition for a resident of Alabama. 

Incidental fee, per half session .$ 2 50 

. Library fee, per half session 1 00 

Surgeons fee, per half session. 2 50 

$ 6 00 

These fees are payable, $6.00 on matriculation and $6.00 
on February 1st. By order of the Trustees no fees cau be 

remitted. 
For students entering after January 1st, the fees for a 

half session only are required. 

For a non-resident of the State there is a charge for 
* tuitionof $20.00 per session, payable $10.00 ou matricula- 
tion and $10.00 on February 1st, in addition to the semi- 
annual fee of $8.00 payable by all studants. 
Board, per month, with fuel and lights $12 to 15 00 



(- 



"S 



88 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



EXPENSES FOR COLLEGE YEAR. 

Fees ..$ 12 00 to $12 00 

Board, lodging, fuel and lights . . . 108 00 to 135 00 

Washing 9 00 to 9 00 

Books, etc., say 8 00 to 15 00 

Total * $137 00 $171 00 

For a non-resident student there should be added to the amounts 
given above $20.00 for tuition. 

UNIFORM. 

A uniform of cadet gray cloth is prescribed, which all under- 
graduate students are required to wear during the session. The 
uniforms are made, by a contractor, of excellent cloth manufactured 
at the Charlottesville mill. This suit, including cap, costs at present 
$14.60. It is neat and serviceable, and less expensive than ordinary 
clothing. 

CONTINGENT FEE. 

A contingent fee of five dollars is required to be deposited by each 
student on matriculation, to cover any special or general damage to 
college property for which he may be liable. 

At the close of the session the whole of the contingent fee, or the 
unexpended balance, is refunded to the student. 

AMOUNT OF DEPOSIT. 

Each student on entering College should deposit with the Treas- 
urer not less than $50.00, to pay the expenses of fees, one month's 
board, uniform, books, etc. 

FUNDS OF STUDENTS. 

Parents and guardians are advised to deposit with the Treasurer 
of the College all funds desired for sons or wards, whether for regu- 
lar charges of college fees or board, or for any other purpose. It is 
the duty of this officer to keep safely all funds placed in his hands, 
and to pay all expenses incurred by the students, including board,' * 
uniform, books, etc., when approved. 

When funds are deposited, checks are drawn on the Treasurer of 
the College by the cadet to pay his necessary expenses. These 
checks are paid only when officially approved. The approval is " 
given only for necessary expenses, as stated in the catalogue, unless 
specially requested in writing by the parent. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



89 



The College cannot be held responsible for the expenses of a 
student, unless the funds are deposited with the Treasurer. No 
student should be permitted to have a large amount of pocket money, 
as it brings only trouble and encourages idleness. 

THESIS. 

• Each applicant for a degree is required to write and submit to the 
Faculty an essay or oration and read and deliver the same at com- 
mencement, if required by the Faculty. 
It must be given to the Professor of English by the first of May. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are two literary societies connected with the Col- 
lege — the Wirt and the Websterian. Each has a hall in the 
main building. 

These societies hold celebrations on the eveuings of 
Thanksgiving Day and 22nd of February. They elect an- 
nually, with the approval of the Faculty, an orator to repre- 
sent them at the close of the year. 

EXERCISES IN ELOCUTION. 

On every Saturday morning, immediately after chapel services, 
oratorical exercises in declamation and in original orations are con- 
ducted by the Professor of English, in the presence of the Faculty 

and students. 

The first and second terms the students of the junior and sophomore 
classes are exercised in original orations and declamation. 

The second and third terms the members of the senior class read 
essays or deliver original orations. 

SOCIETY OF THE ALUMNI. 

The annual alumni oration is delivered by a member of the society, 
in Langdon Hall, on Alumni Day, Tuesday of commencement week. 
The following are the officers of the society : 

Chas.C. Thach, 77, President. 
O.W. Ashceaft, '88, Vice-President. 

W. L. Fleming, '96, Secretary. 
B. H. Ceenshaw, '89, Treasurer. 
W. W. Peaeson, '82, Orator for 1897. 

SURGEON. 

The Surgeon is required to be present at the College 
daily, to visit at their quarters the cadets that are reported 









90 ( Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

sick, and to give all requisite medical attention without 
other charge than the regular surgeon's fee, paid on enter- 
ing college. 

ACADEMIC YEAR. 

The academic yjear for 1897-98 commences on Wednes- 
day, 15th September, 1897 (second Wednesday after the first 
Monday), and euds on Wednesday, 15th June, 1898 (second 
Wednesday after the first Monday), which is commencement 
day. 

It is divided into three terms. The first term extends 
from the opening of the session to the. 23rd of December ; 
the second term begins January 3rd, and ends March 19th • 
the third term continues to the close of the session. 

RESOLUTION OF THE TRUSTEES. 

The following resolution was adopted by the Trustees : 

That in view of increased facilities for instruction in agriculture 
and the technical departments of education now possessed by this 
College, especially in the mechanic arts, made possible by the recent 
donation from the State, the Faculty are authorized, in addition to 
the^egal name of this College, to print on the catalogue the words 
ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, as significant of the ex- 
panded system of practical instruction in industrial science in the 
course of education now provided for. 

DONATIONS TO LIBRARY. 

Congressional and Public Documents- — Senate and House Executive 
and Miscellaneous Documents, 151 vols. 

Hon. G. P. Harrison.— Compendium of 11th Census, 2 vols. ; Report 
of Commissioner of Education, 1894-5, 2 vols. 

Mrs. M. C. Jordan.— Pamphlets on Vivisection. 

Dr. P. H. Mell.— Botanical Text-book, Vol. I. 

R. S Jackson.— Life of Swedenborg; Apocalypse Revealed, by 
Swedenborg; Christian Religion, by Swedenborg; Heaven and Hell, 
by Swedenborg. 

Thomas Egleston.—Lite of Maj. Gen. John Patterson. 

Gen. James H. Zane.— Battle of Chancellorsville, by Augustus / 
Hamlin. 

Hon. John 0. Turner .—Schools Laws of Alabama. 



< 






T 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 91 

G. P. Putnam's Sons.— Redemption of the Body, by Whitehouse ; 
Joint-metallism, by Anson Phelps Stokes. 

Prof. C. C. Thach.— Rolling Ancient History, 2 vols.; Pitkin's 
Political and Civil History of the United States, 2 vols. ; Speeches of 
Celebrated Irish Orators. 

DONATIONS TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL 

ENGINEERING. 

Weston Electrical Instrument Co., Newark, N. J., case of instru- 
ments showing construction. 
Westinghouse Electric Co., Pittsburg, Pa., photographs. 
General Electric Co., Schenectady. N. Y., 5-horse power induction 

motor. 

Electric Appliance Co., Chicago, 111., standard thermometer. 

Iron Clad Rheostat Co., Westfield, N. J., two iron clad rheostats. 

Anderson Water, Light and Power Co., Anderson, S. C, four trans- 
formers. 

General Electric Co., Schenectady, N. Y., photographs. 

Carborundum Co., Niagara, N. Y., samples of carborundum. 

Klemm & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., lamp reflector. 

New York and Ohio Co., Warren, 0., "X" Ray tube. 

Beacon Lamp Co., Boston, Mass., "X" Ray tube. 

L. E. Knott Apparatus Co., Boston, Mass., "X" Ray tube. 

DONATIONS TO DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

1. Konseal Apparatus, J. M. Grosvenor & Co., Boston, Mass. 

2. Materia Medica Specimens, Lehn & Fink, New York. 

3. Materia Medica Specimens and Pharmaceutical Preparations, 
The Mellor <S\Rittenhouse Co., Philadelphia. 

DONATIONS TO MECHANICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Deane Steam Pump Co., Holyoke, Mass., set of castings for vacuum 
pump. 

PERIODICALS. 

The following periodicals are regularly received in the 
main library and are accessible to students. 

LITERARY. 

QUARTERLIES. 

' Current History, Quarterly Journal of Economics, 

Economic Journal, Quarterly Rey.ew, 

Edinburgh Review, Sewanee Review. 
Political Science Quarterly, 




Mi 



92 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



MONTHLIES. 



Atlantic Monthly, 
Blackwood's Magazine, 
Bookman, 
Book Reviews, 
Century Magazine, 
Ohautauquan, 
v Contemporary Review, 
Cosmopolitan, 
Eclectic Magazine, 
Education, f 

Educational Review, 



Academy, 

Athenaeum, 

Critic, 

Dial, 

Harper's Weekly, 

Independent (New York), 



Fortnightly Review, 
Forum, 

Harper's Monthly, 
McClure's Magazine, 
Munsey's Magazine, 
Nineteenth Century, 
North American Review, 
Review of Reviews, 
Scribner's Magazine, 
Westminster Review. 



WEEKLIES. 



Xiterary Digest, 
Literary World (Boston), 
Nation, 

Saturday Review, 
Spectator. 



SCIENTIFIC. 



American Machinist, 
American Journal of Mathe- 
matics, 
Cassier's Magazine, 
Electrical Engineer, 
Electrical Review, 
Electrical World, 
Electrician, 
Engineering, 
Engineering Magazine, 
Engineering and Mining, 



Engineering News, 

Journal of Franklin Institute, 

Machinery, 

Mathematical Monthly, 

Power, 

Scientific American, 

Sibley Journal %f Mechanical 
Engineering, 

Transactions American Insti- 
tute of Electrical Engineers. 



SCIENTIFIC JOURNALS 

and newspapers received in the agricultural experiment station 

library. 

American Agriculturist, 



American Corn and Hog Journal, 
American Cultivator, 
American Gardening, 
American Geologist, 
American Journal of Science, 
American Monthly Microscopi- 
cal Journal, 



American Naturalist, 
American Swineherd, 
Analyst, x 

Anatomischer Anzeiger, 
Annales Agronomiques, 
Annales des Sciences Naturelles : 

Botanique, 
Annals Society Entomology, 



^^■__— _ 



___^____ 



__a_^MB 






Alabama Polytechnic Inshttjte. 



93 



Annals of Botany, 
Annals & Mag. Natural History, 
Anthony's Photographic Bulle- 
tin, 
Annals des K. K. Nat. Hist., 
Asa Gray's Bulletin, 
Botanical Gazette, 
Botanisches Centralblatt, 
Breeder's Gazette, 
Bulletin N. Y. Botanical Garden, 
Bulletin Torrey Botanical Club, 
Bulletin Society of Entomology, 
Berliner Thieraerztliche Wochen- 

schrift, 
Chemical News, 

Centralblatt fuer Bakteriologie, I, 
Centralblatt fuer Bakteriologie, II, 
Commercial and Financial 

Chronicle, 
Comptes Rendus, 
Country Gentleman and Culti- 
vator, 

Die Landwirt. Versuchs-Sta- 
tionen, 

Deutsche Zeitschrift fuer Tier- 
medicine, 

Deutsche Landwirtschaftliche 
Presse, 

Drainage Journal, 

Dairy World, 

Elgin Dairy Report, 

Entomological Monthly Maga- 
zine. 

Entom. Nachrichter, 

Erythea, 

Farm and Home, 

Farmer's Guide, 

Farm and Fireside, 

Farmer's Home, 

Farmer's Voice, 

Farming, 

Farmers' Gazette of New South 

' Wales, 

Florida Farmer and Fruit 
Grower, 

Forester, 



Garden and Forest, 

Gardener's Chronicle, • 

Grange Visitor, 

Geological Magazine, 

Herwigia, 

Hoard's Dairyman, 

Homestead, 

Horticultural Gleaner, 

Holstein-Friesian Register, 

Hufschmied, 

Indiana Farmer, 

Industrial American, 

Journal d'Agriculture Pratique, 

Journal fuer Landwirtschaft, 

Journal Cincinnati Society of 

Natural History, 
Journal American Chemical So- 
ciety, 
Journal of Chemical Industrial 

Society, 
Journal of Botany, 
Journal of Comparative Pathol- 
ogy and Therapeutics, 

Journal % of Geology, 

Journal Chemical Society (Eng- 
land), 

Journal of Horticulture, 

Journal Royal Agricultural So- 
ciety, 

Journal Royal Microscopical So- 
ciety, 

Landwirt Jahrbuecher, 

Market Garden, 

Massachusetts Ploughman, 

Meehans' Monthly, 

Memoirs Torrey Botanical Club, 

Montana Fruit Grower, 

Naturae Novitates, 

Natural Science, 

Nature, 

Optical Lantern Magazine, 

Our Grange Home, 

Practical Farmer, 

Pacific Coast Dairyman, 

Proceedings Rochester Academy 
of Science, 



2078^0 



w 




94 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



II 



Pittonia, 

Philosophical Magazine, 

Photographic Times, 

Popular Science Monthly, 

Prairie Farmer, 

Proceedings Academy of Natural 

Science, Philadelphia, 
Rural New Yorker, 
Science, 

Southern Cultivator, 
Southern Farmer, 
Southern Farm Gazette, 
Southern Farm, 
Southern Planter, 
Successful Farmer, 



Texas Farm and Ranch, 
Transactions Entomological So- 
ciety, 
Veterinary Journal, 
Veterinary Magazine, 
Wallaces' Farmer, 
Wilson's Quart'ly (Ornithology), 
Wilson's Photographic Maga- 
zine, 
Zeitschrift fuer Anal. Chem., 
Zeitschrift fuer Fleisch- und 

Milch-Hygiene, 
Zoologischer Anzeiger, 
Zeitschrift fuer Tiermedicine. 



ADDENDA TO REGISTER OF STUDENTS. " 

• 

Levi Alexander Ezell. . . Jefferson. 

James Heustis Jones • ■ • • • • Wilcox. 

John Paul Jones Wilcox. 

Winston Boykin Jones • • -Wilcox. 

Total Number of Students 361. 



L 





\i% 






MMMtti 



c 



Catalogue of the Alabama 
Polytechnic Institute 



1897 



J 



OCLCt 36819614 
Entered! 19970429 



Type 


t a 




BLvl 


t 8 




S/L: 
Desc 



t a 


I 


1 


040 




2 


007 




3 


043 




4 


090 




5 


090 




6 


049 




7 


110 


2 


8 


245 


10 


9 


246 


10 


10 


260 




11 


300 




12 


310 




13 


362 





14 


515 




15 


500 




16 


533 





*d 1997. *c 

17 539 

18 610 20 





Rec stat: 


n 








Replaced: 


19970429 


Used: 


19970429 


I 


Srce : d 


GPub: 8 


Ctrl : 


Lang: eng 


a 


Conf : 


Fr eq : a 


MRec: 


Ctry: alu 




EntW: 


Regl : r 


ISSN: 


Alph : a 




Cont: 


DtSt: d 


Dates: 1894, 


.1899 1 



*e f *f u *g b *h a *i u *j p I 



ELvl: 

Form: 

Orig: 

SrTp: 

AAA *c AAA 1 

h *b c *d b 

n-us-al 1 

LD271 .A76 I 

*b I 

AAAA I 

Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. I 
Catalogue of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute *h [microform] 1 
Catalog of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute 1 
Auburn, Ala. : ±b The College, *c 1894-1899. 1 
6 v. : *b ill. |**e 23 cm. I 
Annual 1 

1893-94-1898-99. 1 

Issue for 1898-99 carries designation 1899-1900. I 
"State Agricultural and Mechanical College." I 

Microfilm. *m 1894-1899. *b Mobile, Ala. *c Document Technology, 
microfilm reels : negative ; 35 mm. I 
d *b 1894 *c 1899 *d alu *e u *f u *g a 1 
Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama =*=x Curricula *x 



Periodicals . 1 

19 780 00 Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. *t Catalogue of 
he State Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama f 

20 785 00 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. ±t Catalogue of the Alabama 
Polytechnic Institute I 

► 21 830 USAIN State and Local Literature Preservation Project I 



v 



^v 



^r 



k 4. 









i * A '"V'T *v 



'"i ' "■ r\ ' 






■1 r 



AU 
LDP71 

. A76 
1R97/98 

c .2 



.■:.« 



* 



<»^v. 






I 



> - 






iJILD. 






' Polytechnic h< rura. 




MM 



mmm 



I HI — 



- - 



Sii 



— 



^™ 



■ 



r <j r -T 












V 



V 



v. 






/ 






/ 



/ 












V: i 






I 



. 



i 

■ 



I ^ 



V 



,« • •* 









-V « ^ 






u>* 



w 



CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



llakma :[)al)jtcckic 




31 






STATE 



AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL 



COLLEGE. 



1897-98. 



AtrfJUBK, ALABAMA, 



MONTGOMERY, ALA.: 

THE BROWN PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

1898. 



-J 



> 



X 



TRUSTEES. 



His Excellency, JOSEPH F. JOHNSTON, President Ex-officio. 

J. 0. TURNER, Superintendent of Education Ex-officio. 



J. G. Gilchrist (term 

Tancred Betts (term 

Walter 0. Whitaker (term 



expires 1903) . Hope Hull. 

expires 1903) Huntsville . 

expires 1903) A Tuscaloosa. 



Jonathan Haralson (term 

Thos. Williams (term 

J. A. Bilbro ... (term 



expires 1901). / . . . . Selma. 

expires 1901) Wetumpka . 

expires 1901) Gadsden. 



I. F. Culver . (term 

T. H. FrazerV. (term 

*H. Clay Armstrong .(term 

R . H . Duggar (term 



expires 1899) Union Springs. 

expires 1899) ....Mobile. 

expires 1899) Auburn . 

expires 1899)....... Gallion. 



>E. T. GLENN, Treasurer. J 
J. H. DRAKE, M. D., Surgeon. 






y 



BARKSDALE 
***** 

FACULTY AND OFFICERS. 







Wm. LeROY BROUN, M. A., LL. D., 
President and Professor of Physics and Astronomy. 

OTIS D. SMITH, A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics. 

P. H. MELL, M. E.,Ph. D., 
Professor of Botany and Geology. 

JAMES H. LANE, C. E., A. M , Ph. D., LL. D , 
Professor of Civil Engineering and Drawing. 

CHARLES C. THACH, A. M., 
Professor of English and Political Economy. 

GEORGE PETRLE, M. A., Ph. D. t 
Professor of History and Latin. 

A. F. McKISSICK, A. M., M. M. E., 
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Physics. 

B. B ROSS, M. Sc, a 

Professor of General and Agricultural Chemistry and State Chemist. 

CHARLES H. ROSS, C. E., Ph. D., 
Professor of Modern Languages. 

J.J. WILMORE, M. E., 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director of Laboratory. 

C. A. CARY,B. Sc.,D. V.M., 
Professor of Physiology and Veterinary Science. 

MAGNUS. 0. HOLLIS, 1st Lieut. 4th Inf. U. S. A. (West Point), 
Commandant and Professor of Military Science. 

L E. R. MILLER, Phar. M., M. Sc, 
Professor of Pharmacy. 

J. F. DUGGAR, M. So., 
Professor of Agriculture. 

F. S. EARLE, 
Professor of Biology and Horticulture. 

0. F. BAKER, B Sc., 
Assistant Professor of Zoology. 



207881 




^— 



} 






B.H. CRENSHAW, M.E., 
Instructor in Mechanic Arts and Mathematics. 

C.L. HARE, M. So:, 
Instructor in Chemical Laboratory. 

R. J. TRAMMELL, C. E., 
Instructor in Mechanic Arts. 

H. H. KYSER, E. & M. E., 
Instructor in Physical Laboratory. 

W. L.FLEMING, M. Sc, 
Assistant Librarian. . 

M T. FULLAN, 
Assistant in Mechanic Arts. 

R. D. WEBB, B. Sc, 

Assistant in English. 

F.L.TATE, B. So., 
Assistant in English and Mathematics. 

G. M. HOLLEY, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Mathematics. 

G.N. MITCH AM, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Civil Engineering and Drawing. 

W. W. HILL, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Mechanic Ar^s. 

E.B. JOSEPH, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Chemistry. 

W. P.LEONARD, B. Sc, 

Assistant in Agriculture. 

T, G. CONNER, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Electrical Engineering. 

J. B. HOBDY, B. Sc, 
Assistant in charge of Gymnasium. 

W.J NIXON, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Veterinary Science. 

B. S. PATRICK, B. So., 
Assistant in History and Latin. 



M 



OFFICERS 



OP THK 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. 



COnniTTEE OF TRUSTEES ON EXPERIMENT STATION. 

I F. Culver Union Springs. 

J. G. Gilchrist .Hope Hull. 

H. Clay Armstrong , Auburn. 

STATION COUNCIL. 

Wm . LeRoy Broun President. 

P . H . Mell Botanist . 

B. B. Ross Chemist. 

C . A . Cary ..'. '..... • • • • Veterinarian . 

J. F. Duggar '..... Agriculturist. 

F . S . E arle Biologist and Horticulturist . 

C . F . Baker Entomologist . 

J. T. Anderson, Ph. D I Associate Chemist. 

ASSISTANTS. 

C L Hare First Assistant Chemist . 

R. G. Williams, M. Sc Second Assistant Chemist. 

T. U. Culver Superintendent of Farm. 



s 




■ 



m 



r* 



rw<w* 



■■■■■■■ 



m - 




LANQDON HALL. 








r 



L 



1 



(_- 



i . • 

OBJECT OF THE COLLEGE. 



The leading pbject of the College, in conformity with the 
act of Congress and the acts of the State Legislature, is to 
teach the principles arid the applications of science. 

In its courses of instruction it gives prominence to the 
sciences and their applications, especially to those that re- 
late to agriculture and the mechanic arts ; and at the same 
time the discipline obtained by the study of language and 
other sciences i$ not neglected. 

All students are required to study the English language. 
The Latin, French and German languages are also taught, 
and opportunity for their study is offered to students in 
any course. 

The special and technical instruction given is thus based 
on a sound, general education. 

The College, in fact, is a distinctive school of industrial 
science— or Polytechnic iNSTiTUTE—a title which, by reso-' 
lution of the Trustees, is permitted to be inscribed in the 
catalogue, — and work of great value to the youth of the 
State is being accomplished by fitting them by a thorough 
science-discipline, in which manual training in the lower 
classes is made a ^prominent feature, for the successful and 
honorable performance of the* responsible duties of life. 

"While every attention is given to the mental discipline of 
the students in endeavoring to train them to habits of ac- 
curate scientific thought, and thus to qualify them for the 
duties of life, their moral and Christian training will always 
constitute the prominent care and thought of the Faculty. 

i • 






i 

r 



„l I, I H . .I — 



8 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

LABORATORIES AND FACILITIES FOR INSTRUC- 
TION. 

The College now possesses facilities for giving laboratory 
instruction in applied science in the following departments : 

4 

I— IN AGRICULTURE AND HORTICULTURE. 

The farm contains 226 acres, and is supplied with illus- 
trative specimens of stock of select varieties. 

The agricultural experiment station, established in con- 
nection with the College, where experiments and scientific 
investigations relating to agriculture are dailylnade, affords 
unusual opportunities to students to become familiar with 
agriculture, its defects and remedies. 

The students of agriculture accompany the professor in 
the field, "garden, conservatory, stock-yard, etc., where lec- 
tures are delivered in the presence of the objects discussed, 
and during the year exercises in practical agriculture of an 
educational character are given the students who enter 
upon this course of study. 

II— IN MECHANIC ARTS. 

The laboratory of mechanic arts is used as an auxiliary 
in industrial education, and as a school in manual training 
in the arts that constitute tjie foundation of various indus- 
trial pursuits. The work performed by the students is in- 
structive in character, as in any other laboratory, and the 
classes are taught in sections by a series of graded lessons 
under the supervision of the professor. In the lower classes 
of the College each student enters this school and is' as- 
signed three exercises a week, each exercise being two 
hours long. 

The object of this laboratory is not to teach a trade, but 
to educate, to discipline and train the eye and the hand, as 
well as the mind, and thus by associating manual and 
mental training, to educate thoroughly the student for the 
duties of life, whatever may be his vocation. There is no 




4 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 9 

attempt to teach students special skill in constructing arti- 
cles of commercial value, but all the exercises are syste- 
matically arranged and designed for purposes of education. 
The wood department is located iu a commodiou3 hall, 
90 x 50 feet, and is provided with a twenty-five horsepower 
Corliss engine, a planer, circular saw, band-saw, two scroll 
saws, a buzz planer, a pattern maker's lathe, twenty-four 
stands each with a lathe and a full set of tools, and thirty 
benches for carpentry work with the tools requisite for con- 
struction. 

A brick building, 30 x 87 feet, with two rooms, has been 
constructed especially for instruction in working iron. 

One room is equipped with sixteen forges and tools re- 
quired for a forge department, and the other with a Colliau 
cupola furnace, a core oven, a brass furnace, molding 
benches, a foundry crane constructed by students, and 
special tools for use in a foundry. 

The forge and foundry rooms are furnished with a Sturte- 
vant fan and exhauster, supplied with power from a ten 
horsepower engine, constructed by the students in me- 
chanic arts. 

The machine department occupies a brick building, 
30 x 50 feet, and is equipped with ten engine lathes, one 
speed lathe, one 20-inch drill press, one 10-inch sensitive 
drill, one post drill, one 16-inch shaper, one 5-foot planer, 
one universal milling machine, a corundum tool grinder, a 
small emery grinder, a universal cutter and reamer grinder, 
a No. 1 Brown & Sharpe universal grinding machine, and 

a power hack saw. 

The chipping and filing department is arranged with 
benches, vises and tools for twelve students. 

The tool room is well supplied with special tools for use 
in instruction, including a machine for grinding twist drills. 
The rooms are lighted with electricity whenever necessary. 




V 



10 



/ 



Alabama Polhe0Snic Institute. 

ni — iN PRACTICAL CHEMISTRY. 



The chemical laboratory is supplied with modern appa- 
ratus, and in its equipment affords excellent facilities for 
instruction in practical chemistry and for investigation. 

The investigations that are undertaken in this laboratory 
by scientific experts, in connection with the work of the 
agricultural experiment station, are of especial value to ad- 
vanced students, and afford them unusual opportunities to 
learn the methods of scientific research. The building con- 
tains a large general laboratory that will accommodate sixty 
students, a lecture room with a capacity for one hundred 
seats, and nine other rooms, all appropriated to instruction 
and research in chemistry. 

IV— IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

The electrical laboratory is well supplied with modern 
appliances for instruction in electrical engineering It 
occupies two large rooms in the basement, and is equipped 
with many fine instruments of precision: Kelvin deka- 
ampere balance, Kelvin graded current and potential gal- 
vanometers, Cardew voltmeter, Weston voltmeters and am- 
meter, Queens magnetic vane voltmeter and ammeter 
Thomson watt-meter, Hartman and Braun voltmeter ' 
Kohlrausch ammeter, Wood ammeter, Weston alternating 
current voltmeter, Weston direct reading watt-meter, Que n'f 
Acme testing set, Eowland-D'Arsonval galvanometer 
Kelvin electrostatic voltmeter, Edison ammeters, and many 
w l ^-measuring instruments, resistance boxes 

zssi ges> condensers ' teiepho * es ' ^ 

horse power Westinghouse engine Tt'h , S?*** 
installed the following dynamos UlldlDg are 

Edison compound 12 Kilo-watt generator Th„ 
Houston 150 light 110 volt dynamo, C^ 2k2~ 
pere generator, Crocker-Wheeler one horse ™I ! 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 11 

moters, 20 horse power each (so connected as to be used as 
direct or alternating current motors or generators), one 
5 horse power three phase motor, one General Electric 20 
horsepower motor, one 40 light shunt dynamo, one Edi- 
son 3 Kilo-watt generator, one Stanley induction motor with 
condenser, two bi-phase induction motors (built by students), 
one 9 light Thomson-Houston arc machine, two phase alter- 
nator and 500 volt 20 ampere generator, made by students. 
There is also in connection with this department at the ex- 
periment station, a ten horse power motor, made by stu- 
dents, which is operated by the 500 volt generator in the 

dynamo room. 

v— in PHYSICS. 

I In the College building provision is made for elementary 
laboratory work in the department of physics. Special 
rooms in the basement are appropriated for this purpose, 
and are equipped with the necessary appliances for instruc- 
tion in practical physics. 

VI — IN MINERALOGY. 

This laboratory occupies a convenient room in the base- 
ment, and is provided with tables and appliances to accom- 
modate thirty students, with an excellent collection of 
minerals. 

VII — IN BOTANY. 

In the work of the agricultural experiment station there 
is a botanical garden under the charge of the professor of 
botany, investigations in botany are given special attention, 
and opportunities are offered advanced students for practi- 
cal work in a laboratory especially fitted with microscopes, 
tables, a dark room for photographic work, and appliances 
needed for instruction and research. This department is 
provided with Auzoux's clastic models of seeds and flowers 
for teaching botany. 



■? 






12 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

viii— in biology. * . 

The laboratory in this department adjoins the lecture 
room of the professor, and is furnished with tables, excel- 
lent microscopes and appliances for investigation. Each 
student of the class works under the supervision of the 
professor. 

ix— in engineering and surveying. 

The necessary apparatus for field work, including ttansits, 
levels, plane table, models of bridges, etc., is provided for 
the use of the students, and the customary exercises in the 
field are given. 

X— IN DBA WING. 

All students in the lower classes are required to take 

drawing, a study which tends to discipline the mind, as 

well as to train the eye and hand to accuracy of observation 

and execution. A large, well-lighted drawing-room which 

^ will accommodate fifty students, is provided with tables 

lock boxes, etc. 

XI— IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

The mechanical course has been extended to include ex- 
perimental work in mechanical engineering. 

The apparatus available for ^instruction is as follows- 
, A ff h ° rSe P ° Wer Im P erial Cross compound engine, espe- 

J cially arranged for experimental work, supplied with 

.1 Wheeler surface condenser and Deane air pump and circu- 

I lating pump , a 25 horse power Harris-Corliss engine a 

I d6 horse power Westinghouse engine, a 25 horse power 

» Atlas engine, two 9 horse power engines constructed by 

H students, the boilers belonging to the regular power plant 

a small engine and boiler for the special purpose of making 
g efficiency tests, a Deane duplex steam pump, a four horse 

| power gasoline engine, an Ericsson hot air engine, a New 

York air pump, a Westinghouse air pump, four steam 

engine indicators, a separating calorimeter, thermometers 

a pyrometer, scales, a standard steam gauge with apparatus 

for testing steam gauges, a Crosby dead weight tester with 






I 



^ 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 13 

weights for correcting the standard gauge, a 35,000- pound 
testing machine, a Henning micrometer extensometer, and 
a Carpenter calorimeter with the necessary auxiliary appa- 
ratus for determining the heating value of different kinds of 

coal. 

This work is now carried on in the lower story of the 
annex to the chemical laboratory. This room is 30x60 feet 
in size and was specially designed and fitted up for this 
purpose. A three-inch steam main has been laid from the 
boiler house, thus securing a steam supply in the building 
for all work requiring it. The work is thoroughly practi- 
cal, and it is desired to extend it as rapidly as the funds 
available for the purchase of apparatus will allow. 

XII— IN PHYSIOLOGY AND VETERINARY SCIENCE. 

There has been constructed for the veterinary department 
a new and separate two-story building with nine rooms. It 
is provided with lecture room, office, working and operating 
rooms for clinical practice, and museum with skeletons of 
the domestic animals for instruction. Free clinics are 
given every Saturday fpr the benefit of the students in 
veterinary science. 

XIII — IN PHARMACY. 

The laboratory of this department occupies the second 
floor of the annex to chemical laboratory, and is provided 
with a sufficient supply of drugs and apparatus necessary 
for instruction in pharmaceutical preparations. 

The students work in the laboratory with the professor, 
from five to eight hours, six days in the week. 

It is expected to increase the facilities as means are 

available. 

MILITARY TACTICS. 

Instruction in this department is given in conformity with 
the act of Congress. Students receive the benefit of regu- 
lar military drill, and in addition the military system is 



14 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



used as a means of enforciDg discipline and securing good 
order, promptness and regularity in the performance of 
academic duties. 

This department is under the charge of Lieut. M. 0. 
Hollis, 4th Infantrv, U. S. A. 

It is supplied with new cadet muskets and accoutrements 
for the corps. 



COLLEGE BUILDINGS. 

The frontispiece is a Representation of the main College building 
It is 160 x 71 feet and contains forty-five rooms. This building is 
not used for dormitories for students, but is appropriated to purposes 
of instruction and investigation. 

• It contains the lecture rooms and offices of the professors, labora- 
tories, library, museum, armory, etc. 

LANGD0N HALL. 

This is a two-story building, 90 x 50 feet. The second story is the 
audience ha 1, used for commencement and other public occasions 
The first story ,s appropriated to the laboratory of mechanic arts. 

THE CHEMICAL LABORATORY, - 

As shown on the opposite page, is a two story structure, 40 x 60 feet 
with a rear projection, 35 x 60 feet, of one-story and basempn, J 
contains eight rooms. The exterior is of presse/brl £ SSSSfi 
trimmings and terra-cotta ornamentation 

storage" baSement "" ^ ****** *>, assaying and 

The main laboratory will accommodate sixty students »nrt » »■•. 
improved working table, with water, gas SSX^SSSSS 
ance for chemical work. ■* I,ecessa, 7 apph- 

The second story contains a lecture room with seats «nH f»w * * 

eighty students. Around the lecture room a^e easel 1 '* ^ 

and manufactured products illustrVnnT n ? imngCnide 

„k^™- f • tJluuuccs » "mstrating agncultura and industrial 

chemistry, prominent subjects taught in the institution. ,ndUStrial 

ANNEX TO CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

This is a three-storv brink hn ;ih ;»,,., ~ *. • • 

otuiv uncK ouuaing containing rooms for mpohnni 
cal engineering, pharmacy, and drawing. mecbani- 





CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 




BT 



(U) 



I 




GRADUATES IN 1897. 



CLASS OF 1897. 



f 



HONOR GRADUATES. 

COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 

Edwin Boyce Joseph ..' ••..•• Montgomery. 

COURSE IN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

Thomas Ganaway Conner ... •• Macon. 

COURSE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING> 

George Nathan Mitcham. ;.......... Georgia. 

GENERAL COURSE. 

Peyton Graves Clark. Montgomery. 

DEGREES. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. 

William Kirk Armstrong. . . Lee. ^ 

Erister Ashcraft.. ' . . . . i. • • • °* Carolina. 

Richard Manning Boykin ,.. • ££«-£ 

Edgeworth Stephens Casey t ! w 

*. Montgomery. 

Peyton Graves Clark.. * ri 

Robert Walter Collins ;.-..... m 

Thomas Ganaway Conner ' '' ['-^^^Z^ 

George Leonard Faucett 

William Alexander Fitzgerald. • • .Georgia. 

wuiiani , Montgomery. 

Gaston Greil.. Tallapoosa. 

Joseph Herzfeld ; • • Lge 

John Fletcher Heard •••••• • , ad 

William Welch Hill ...Bollock 

John Buford Hobdy -. Ooreia 

George Michael Holley • •■ .-• y™^ 

William Alexander Hood.. .Montgomery. 

Olarenoe Neil. Jones. ....Montgomery. 

Edwin Boyce Joseph Dale 

Adas Edwin^Killebrew 



/ 



16 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



Earle Foster Lee Lee. 

William Parker Leonard .Georgia. 

Warren Horton McBryde Mobile. 

William Wrice McLeran . . ; Macon. 

George Nathan Mitcham Georgia. 

Wade Hampton Negus Mississippi. 

Charles Johnston Nelson Dallas. 

WUliam Jacob Njxon.. Tennessee. 

Benjamin Sweat Patrick South Carolina. 

James Lawrence Pollard RusselL ' 

Leonard Calloway Pratt Bibb. 

John Purifoy Lee. 

John Wesley Purifoy . . Perry. 

Berry Lathum Scott. . Texas. 

Oliver John Semmes. Mobile. 

Samuel Toliver Slaton. .. ... Macon. 

Frederick Loyd Tate ■ Russell. v 

Merrick Dowdell Thomas . . Chambers. 

Paul Vines , Tallapoosa. 

William Tilman Warren Montgomery. 

Reuben David Webb. . . Coosa. 

Noble James Wiley . Montgomery. 

George Wrigley Georgia. 

Thomas Jefferson Brooks (class of 1890). Georgia. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE. 

Charles Nutting Alford Marshall 

William James Beeson . . . . Etowah 

Joseph Quarterman Burton L ee 

Walter Lynnewood Fleming Pike. 

Hampton Sanders Henderson . Talladega 

George Bates Kelley ....//// !/ Jefferson/ 

Benjamin Asbury Taylor Autauga. 

William Martin Williams Georgia 

ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEER. 
Jesse Boland Edwards Talladeea 




vy 



DISTINGUISHED STUDENTS. 



Students who receive a grade above 90 in three studies in the 
freshman classy in four in the sophomore, in five in 
the junior, and in six in the senior, are dis- 
tinguished for excellence in schol- 
arship, and are awarded 

HONOR CERTIFICATES. 

The following students received honor certificates in 1897 : 

SENIOR CLASS. 

Erister Ashcraft. . , • *f e ' 

Robert Walter Collins.. Hale - 

Thomas Ganaway Conner ^H*?™' 

William Welch Hill •• Talladega. 

John Buford Hobdy •••• Bullock. 

George Michael Holley Georgia. 

Clarence Neil Jones ••• Vontgomery. 

George Nathan Mitcham -^orgia. . 

Wade Hampton Negus......... . .Mississ, PP i. 

William Jacob Nixon ■•• fennessee. 

Frederick Loyd Tate Russell. 

Reuben David Webb •• 0oosa * 

HONOR STUDENTS IN THE JUNIOR CLASS. 

COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 

Arthur McBride Ransom Georgia. 

COURSE IN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANCAL ENGINEERING. 

Jonathan Haralson Dallas - 

COURSE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

Thomas Harrison Clower Lee - 

GENERAL COURSE. 

Halbert Clyde Ray Geneva. 

2 



y 






*\ 



™ Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Erin Black T 

Mary Wright Boyd \ ' 

Thomas Harrison Clower T _ 

Pearl Hanson j 

William Earle Hndmon j 

.lessie Hamilton Lockhart . rT' ■ 

Julia Hill Moore... .'.' Georgia. 

Annie Lucinda Purifoy , 

Arthur McBride Ransom. '. p . 

Halbert Clyde Ray Georgia. 

Marie Louise Scott. ' "' ? eneva - 

Rush Price Strong..::.! &£, 

s Mobile. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Flake Earle Farley. 

Walter Eldridge Johnson.'.' „• 

Julien Chandler Yonge. Madison. 

Florida. 



>. 








CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 



FOR THE SESSION OF 1897-98. 



Graduate Students. 

[Residence is Alabama when State is not given.] 

NAME. RESIDENCE. 

William Kirk Armstrong . . . .Lee. 

Robert Walter Collins .. . Hale. 

Thomas Ganawav Conner Macon. 

James Washington Culver Lee. 

George Webster Duncan Lee. 

Walter Lynnewood Fleming Pike. 

George Thomas Edgar Tuskaloosa. 

John Louis Glenn .... '...... Butler. 

Arthur Williamson Greene Chambers. 

William Welch Hill .Talladega. 

John Buford Hobdy Bullock. 

Walter Pearce Holco.mbe * ' Mobile. 

George Michael Holley Georgia. 

Edwin Boy ce Joseph . . . Montgomery. 

William Parker Leonard ....... Georgia. 

George Nathan Mitcham Georgia. 

William Jacob Nixon Tennessee. 

•f Benjamin Sweat Patrick South Carolina. 

John Purifoy • . . .Lee. 

Frederick Loyd Tate Russell. 

Sheldon Lyne Toomer Lee. 

Reuben David Webb. Coosa. 

George Wrigley Georgia. 



■ I«ir-ii.i 



20 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



Undergraduate Students, 
senior class. 

John Cocke Abernethy . Florida. 

Lemuel Sledge Allen Marengo. 

'Erin Black Lee. 

''Mary Wright Boyd Lee. 

/William Haraill Bruce Montgomery. 

Alexander Humphreys Clark Montgomery. 

Henry Neal Coleman Lowndes. 

George Oliver Dickey Crenshaw. 

Duncan Patterson Dixon Talladega. 

Clifford Lamar Edwards Lee. 

Eichard Roe Eppes Marengo. 

Frank Reese Frazer . . Lee. 

FrankFarley .......Lee. 

William Shelby Garner Shelby. 

Elmer Wynn Gray.. Georgia. 

Jonathan Haralson Dallas. 

Francis Williams Hare . . Lee. 

Charles Edward Harrison Florida. 

Harry Streety Houghton ; Jefferson. 

William Earle Hudmon Lee. ' 

/Joseph Wood King ..Georgia. 

Absalom Mason Kennedy Montgomery. 

Jessie Hamilton Lockhart Georgia. 

George Edward Mason Shelby. 

John Richard- McCalla Lee. 

Peter Mastin Mclntyre . . . .' ; Montgomery. 

Henry Edmund Memminger South Carolina. 

William Augustus Mitchell Georgia. 

Julia Hill Moore L ee 

' Frank Greene Morriss Talladega. 

Ashleigh Strudwick Moses Baldwin. 

John Sanford Paden Etowah. 

Alexander Simpson Pow Jefferson. 

y/Annie Lucinda Turifoy .* Lee. 




i 



» 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 21 

^Arthur McBride Ransom. % Georgia. 

Halbert Clyde Ray , Geneva. 

James Barrie Shivers Perry. 

Newton Caraway Smith Shelby. 

Clifford West Stewart Montgomery. 

William Livingston Stewart Montgomery. 

William Bee Stokes Marion. 

Edward Wadsworth Stone Montgomery. 

Rush Price Strong Mobile. 

Joseph Wilson Sutcliffe . .Louisiana. 

Almuth Cunningham Vandiver Talladega. 

Bishop Billing Warwick Talladega. 

John Wesley Williams Lee. 

Joseph Leonard Wood Mobile. 

' Neander Montgomery Woods Tennessee. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

LeRoy James Allen ....Marengo. 

Jesse Maldrie Atkinson Dale. 

Alston Boyd Tennessee. 

William Bowdon Beard (c) .Pike'. 

Harriet Lavinia Dabney Bondurant (c) — Lee. 

Bailey Edgar Brown Morgan. 

Mattie Lucile Burton Lee. 

Thomas Greene Bush .Calhoun. 

Charles Wallace Collins .Hale. 

George Davis Collins (c) . . Hale. 

McNeill Crawford Lee. 

Colonel Seldon Crew . . .Coosa. 

Frederick Robert Daly Jefferson. 

Bolivar Davis .....Jefferson. 

Claude Davidson • .Georgia. 

Marion Dawson Elmore. 

James Francis Dobbin (c)...... Florida. 

Allan Willis Elkins Texas. 

(c) Conditioned. 



/ 



22 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



Flake Earle Farley Lee. 

Arthur Henry Feagin Bullock. 

Hugh Matherson Fenn (c) Barbour. 

Jones Stephen Gilliland Coosa. 

John Boss Glenn .. Lee. 

Theophilus Eaton Goodwin Crenshaw. 

Fannie Maud Holstun Lee. 

Felix Grundy Horn (c) . Sumter. 

Walter Eldridge Johnson . . . . Madison. 

James Heustis Jones Wilcox. 

Winstou Boykin Jones ...... Wilcox. 

Kate Meade Lane . . . . . .Lee. 

Lottie Everard Lane. ....... . , ]j ee . 

Harry Toulmin Lay (c) Mobile. 

Thomas Herrington McAdory Jefferson. 

Isham Fennell McDonnell. Madfson. 

Graham Edwin Merchant LeC 

Charles Henry Merritt (c) Chilton^ 

Chad wick Wiley Minge .Marengo 

Hartley Allen Moon ....Coosa. 

Auline Judson Moore (c) . . L ee 

Angelo Marvin Nowlin ... DeKalb 

James Royden Peabody . . ... Georgia 

Hattie Marshall Phelps [[[[ ; Lee . 

Lawrence Bratton Bainey DeKalb 

Archie McDonnell Robinson (c) Madison. 

Mary Evelyn Robinson # L ee 

Wilmer Chatham Robinson (c) []][[ Tallapoosa 

John Osgood Rush r. L ee 

William Oscar Scroggs .....Georgia 

James Cary Slaton m q ~ 

TT7 .„. A1 J : ' Macon. 

William Alexander Thomason (c) Randolph 

Dozier Turner (c) BImoi £ ' 

ir w'lr w '" Madis ™' 

Thomas William W»rt Morgan v 

George Madison Wheeler , . ..Madison 

Julien Chandler Yonge Florida 

(c) Conditioned. 




1 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 23 

sophomore class. 

William Lawrence Anderson Montgomery. 

Fletcher Ashcraft Lee. 

Buckner Beasley (c) hee. 

Robert Pierce Baldwin Lee. 

Malcolm Alfred Beeson Etowah. 

John Samuel Black Lee. 

Guy French Boyd Lee. 

Jesse Wright Boyd Lee. 

Abner Mason Buchanan (c) *. . .Lee. 

Edwin Bukofzer Tennessee. 

Judson Lamar Burke .Lee. 

Salmon Holmes Burns Lee. 

Kelly Walker Burwell Madison. 

Andrew Crozier Cameron (c) Jefferson. 

Frank Bovard Chapman . . . Louisiana. 

Asbury Nicholson Culver. Lee. 

William Crawford Dowdell Lee. 

William Beach Dozier Georgia. 

Ellis Madison Duncan Franklin. 

Luther Noble Duncan Franklin. 

Rutherford Sylvanus Finch Montgomery. 

Philip Hamilton Fitzgerald (c) Georgia. 

Robert Emmett Fitzgerald Georgia. 

John Jefferson Flowers Butler. 

Sherman Guy Forbes , Henry. 

Earle Humphreys Foy Barbour. 

James Edgar Foy Barbour. 

Hermon Gillis Georgia. 

James Olney Goggans Tallapoosa. 

William Weatherly Hannon . . . .' Montgomery. 

Roland B. Hall Georgia. 

Edward Zellars Heard Lee. 

Robert Thomas Hicks Talladega. 

John Paul Illges (c) Georgia. 

Emmett Francis Jackson Lee. 

(c) Conditioned. 







—— 



Mm 



8' 

T i 



24 



. Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



\ 









Walter Atlee Jordan Elmore. 

Moses Frank Kahn Lee. 

Wilbur Edrald Kelley Jefferson. 

Strother Trabue Key Jefferson. 

Howard Malcolm Kilpatrick Georgia. 

Leon Phillippe Le Hardy Georgia. 

John Maples Russell. 

James Guy Marcrum Georgia. 

William Christopher Martin Barbour. 

Frank Clark McAlpine Talladega. 

Walter Deems McCrary (cj Lee. 

Benjamin Lee McGee (c) .Georgia. 

James Hardie McGehee Montgomery. 

John Thomas Mcintosh (c) Tallapoosa. 

Kenneth Bethune McKenzie ....Butler 

Lafayette Murdoch Meriwether " .'.Montgomery 

James Butler Mitchell Lowndes ' 

Collett Henry Munger (c; Jefferson. 

Robley Charles Munger Jefferson. 

William Livingston Neill (c) Jefferson> 

Carlyle Nisbet (c) Georgia 

Charles Walter Nixon .. . nC« 

Marion Franklin Owens r,l ^ 

^ ^ . Cleburne. 

George Benagh Phillips Geo • 

Hiram Perry Powell .... •" " Q eQ g 

Fleming James Bigney . . .' \,][\ [[[[[ ] y^ 

James Richard Rutland . . nu u 

William Stowe Rutledge -^ambers. 

Herman Scharnagel (c) )\' : \W\\ j,,* „. 

Frederick Blount Shepard ... . Mnhil 

John Winfred Shuff. . . '" %°u? 

Joseph Manning Steiner . Z '• \ \ \ '. \ \ '. WWW B^ 
John Marion Tamplin (c). t, 

Arthur Holt Warreir ' v J B \ 

Alfred Taylor Whiteside' .'.'." Mont gomery . 

James Waldo Woodruff Tennessee. 

Moses Conrad Wright. .'. W. '.'.'.'.'. ".'.'. '.'.'.' .'.'.' mZT' 

(c) Conditioned. 




1 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



25 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Jftmos Bftd^r^tf^d (c) . . . . . .Henry. 

■rfuuiBy Olli AlUm Lee. 

Sy Andrews (c) Georgia. 

Oliver Burnside Andrews • • ■ Tennessee. 

Stearnes Pearson Baker (c) Tallapoosa. 

Joseph Nathaniel Barker Georgia. 

William Ho rt p n "P ' (o) Lee. 

VS ,| | •ff iii rtl li m'tT l il ll iiff fiiV ...Calhoun. 

William LeGrande Burnett . . . . . Barbour. 

William James Cameron (c) .Montgomery. 

James Lorenzo Deaton Georgia. 

John Isham Dorsey (c). « - Lee. 

Malcolm Nassau Fleming .Georgia. 

F i ' iink P i mn' i TY i lmrnr Pike. 

John Drewry Foy Barbour. 

William Alexander Frazer ....... Lee. x 

GbasgeJfeifi*. , Macon - 

Jacob Lionel Haas (c) .Montgomery. 

Joooph Hinn* Hftll (e) Butler ' ; y 

Wallace Benjamin Harrison .... Talladega. 

Michael Smith Harvey Lee. 

Be*jfwme~Garrl Hatcher (c) Georgia. 

William Baxter Haynes .Lowndes. 

Daniel Haywood Haynes ................ .Lowndes. 

James Kelly Haynie (c) Montgomery. 

Eobert Holland Hood. Jefferson. 

Edwin DeWitt Huguley • • .Georgia. 

P j / c \ Montgomery. 

Arthur Flournoy Jackson Georgia. 

James Baxter Jackson. Lee. 

Madison. 

/ c ) . Mobile. 

Claude Kauffman(c) ..Mobile. 

{( j Tennessee. 

Bobert Paterson Manly Georgia. 

(c) Conditioned. 






26 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

Daniel Stacy Martin (c) Barbour. 

Robert Murdoch Martiu Barbour. 

Earle Irvin McBryde . Wilcox. 

Stanton MnKfnfry (c) Marengo. 

Benjamin Baldwin Meriwether (c) Montgomery. 

Eiakimj;Millor (c) . Mississippi. 

Abram Hill Mitchell (c) Lee. 

Jordan Holsey Mitchell Lee. 

James Crowder Moore. . . Lee. 

Merrill Hastings Moore Montgomery. 

Peter Preer Myhand (c) Lee. 

Tiiiiiijili TJiolmird Pirinn (c) . . . Barbour. 

James Cochran Phelps Lee. 

^flinlf tow** rinlnfrin Chilton. 

WilHftjaJiM*>aq ••;*■ Tennessee. 

Oscar Menderson Schloss Barbour. 

Henry Alexander Skeggs Morgan. 

Matthew Scott Sloan (c) .Mobile. 

Earnest Walter Thompson Macon. 

Abner Mason Torbert (c) Macon. 

Elijah Albert Turner (c) Lee. 

Vej a*jn Burleigh -Wfrttteside (c) Tennessee. 

Gaius Whitfield Marengo. 

Edward Houston Wills Lee. 

(c) Conditioned. 

SPECIAL AND IRREGULAR STUDENTS. 

Abbreviations: Ph —Pharmacy ; E. & M. E.— Electrical and Me- 
chanical Engineering; C— Chemistry ; Ag.— Agriculture; C. E. — 
Civil Engineering. 

James Anderson Allen C Jefferson. 

Frank Hammond Bancroft ph Perry. 

Lynn Mathews Boyd. ph Macon. 

Charles Louis Bragaw PH Lee. 

Emmett Gale Buck Mobile. 

Rufus White Butler ph Lee. 



ma 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 27 

Toccoa Cozart .Montgomery. 

Arthur Henry Davis e. & M. E . . . . Mobile. 

Ramon Eraso e. & M. E . . . .Venezuela. 

Michael Thomas Fullan E. a m. e . . . . Georgia. 

Emmett Spencer George Marengo. 

Joseph Henry Glover Georgia. 

Eula Belle Hale Lee. 

ZaideHale Lee - 

John Dabney Hamilton .ph Lee. 

Pearl Hanson - • Lee - 

Walter Avery Henson e. & M. E . . . . Tennessee. 

Emmett Armistead Jones ph. ... r Marengo. 

John Paul Jones . • Wilcox. 

Sidney Johnston Jones ph. Georgia. 

Earle Benjamin Lentz . . c. E Mobile. 

Gqorge Simial Lombard . . . . Georgia. 

Barton Harris McQueen Montgomery. 

Martin Luther Malloy Lee. 

George Mathews Marks AG .Montgomery. 

Andrew McCord Lee - 

John Mettauer McGoolrick . . . . E. & M. E . . . . Georgia. 

Hugh Tredegar McKinnon . . .- Bullock. 

Benjamin Otey Minge e. & M. E . . . . Marengo. 

George Eleming Moore e. & M. E. . . . Montgomery. 

George McElhany Moore Lee. 

John Peabody Moore Georgia. 

Eobert Leslie Newman ph Lee. 

Emile Thomas Peddy .' Lee. 

John Abner Penton ph Coosa. 

Harry John Pettus .Montgomery. 

John Percy Beid Perry. 

John Watson Eutland Lee. 

Joseph Schwartz PH . ....... .Marengo. 

Lucius Kelly Simmons ph ....... . .Jefferson. 

Sidney Ewing Simpson „ Montgomery. 

Berta Leonora Summers .Lee. 

Fannie Louise Thomas Lee. 



J 



28 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

George Hoover Thomson.. . . . (E . & m. e. . . .Louisiana. 

Pies May Tindell E . k M . e. . . . Mobile. 

Edgar Earle Upch urcb ph Pickens. 

James Robert Vann . PH . . .Henry. " 

Henry Beecham Visscher..... ph. Florida 

Charles Finley White 7. V/. Jefferson. 

William Dunbar Wills PH . Lee. 

SUB-FRESHMAN CLASS. 

George Adams..... j,^ 

J a lies Walter Aids Mont 

Clifford Douglas Biankensi;ip\\\\\;;;;;;;; Mont g 3y.' 

C I'? n-n kc « BuUard • &*&* 

Charles Clifton Brown M i 

Charles Newton Caraway Montgomeiy. 

E. ii _ J ■• < Male, 

ugene Albert Dumas T • • 

Paul Metzger Efehelberger Louisiana. . 

Edward Gaston Fike.. ' 22?^ " 

Robert Henry Harwell '" ' Z 

Macon Leigh Jones ™ Dg0 ' 

William George Jackson Sf 8rS0D - 

Hubbard Hobbs Kelly f f ?! 

Claud Lewis King Madison. 

Albert Sidney Lewis . . ^" y \ 

Philip Warren Low -Talladega. 

James Philip Martin Montgomery. 

Robert Lafonzo Martin harbour. 

Ross Earnest Mattison J?^** 

William Emory Mcintosh £* l^ 

James Whitaker Nisbet Tallapoosa. 

William Marcus Peters ' * * * * ' 5° 88eIL 

Richard Blount Shepard «?? 

Arnold Trigg Mobile. 

Leland Dock Trippe Marengo. 

John Morgan Turner .'..'.'. Marengo. 

Calvin Earle Upchurch ■'*'"' £ ee ; 

••• Pickens. 



/"-• 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 29 

Non Dura Ward Tallapoosa. 

William Hubert Young Barbour. 

Summary. 

Graduates •'•-■ 

Senior Class .' 

Junior Class • 

Sophomore Class . 

Freshman Class 

Special and Irregular Students • • • 5Q 

Total in College Classes. •..."...' 3i2 

Sub-Freshman Class 



72 
62 



j.ot)ai .... ..••■• .••• ... 

NUMBER OF STUDENTS IN EACH SUBJECT OF STUDY. 



341 



51 
12 



E D gH=h. . . / 2G0 Geology 

History 168 Civil Engineering 

French ' 52 Electrical Engineering. . 53 

Geman ' .'. . 34 Mechanical Engineering . 35 

Latin I* 1 Biology. 19 

Mental Science 27 Drawing 150 

Political Economy 41 Mechanic Arts 1% 

Mathematics. ........ -248 Military Tactics 294 

Chemistry .. !<# Mineralogy .... 6 

Chemical Laboratory .... 70 Physical Laboratory . . . . 64 

Agriculture i 105 Physiology 52 

ph sic8 192 Veterinary Science.. ... 30 - 

Botany.".' 93 Pharmacy... • • • 4*=" »> 

Bacteriology lo 



P 

jW 



/ 



MILITARY ORGANIZATION, 

1897-98. 



President, 
W. L. BROUN. 

Commandant, 
M. 0. HOLLIS, 1st Lieut 4th Infantry, U. S. A. . 

Surgeon, 
J. H. DRAKE. 

Battalion Staff. 
Cadet Captain P. M. McIntyre, Assistant to Commandant. 
Cadet 1st Lieutenant J. 8. Paden, Adjutant. 
Cadet 1st Lieutenant A. MoB. Ransom, Quartermaster. 
Cadet Sergeant G. M. Wheeler, Sergeant Major. 
Cadet Sergeant T. G. Bush, Quartermaster Sergeant. 

Cadet Captains. 

3. C. W. Stewart, 

4. J. C. Abernethy. 

Cadet First Lieutenants. 

5. R. P. Strong, 

6. L. S. Allen, 

7. H.C.Ray. 

8. A.M.Kennedy. 

Cadet Second Lieutenants. 

3. E.W.Gray, 

4. F. G. Morriss. 
Cadet First Sergeants. 

3. J, F. Dobbin, 

4. T. W. Wert. 
Cadet Sergeants, 

9. J. H. Jones, 

10. G. D. Collins, 

11. J.A.Ward, 
12. 



1. A. C. Vandiver, 

2. F. W. Hare, 

1. J. W. Williams, 

2. G. 0. Dickey, 

3. H. S. Houghton, 

4. C. L. Edwards, 

1. E.W.Stone, 

2. C. E. Harrison, 

1. J. C. Yonge, 

2. I. F. McDonnell, 



1. C. W. Minge, 

2. L: B. Rainey, 

3. A. H. Feagin, 

4. B.Davis, 

5. J. M. Atkinson, 

6. A. Boyd, 

7. A. W. Elkins, 



8. J. R. Peabody (Color Sergeant), 16. 



B. E. Brown, 

13. W. B. Jones, 

14. J. R. Glenn, 
D. Turner, 
W. O. Scroggs. 



15 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



31 



1. H. P Powell, 

o. E. H. Foy, 

3. F. Ashcraft, 

4 G. F. Boyd, 

5. W. E. Kelley, 

6. J. L Burke, 

7. R. T. Hicks, 
8> j. W. Shufp, 



Cadet Corporals. 




9. 


K. B. McKenzie, 


10. 


J. J. Flowers, 


11. 


K. P. Baldwin, 


12. 


J. P. ILL(JES, 


13. 


A.C. Cameron, 


14. 


S. T.Key, 


15 


J. H. McGehee, 


16. 


F. C. MoAlpine. 






32 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 









m 



n 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

All applicants for admission should present testimonials 
of good moral character, and those who come from other 
colleges must present certificates of honorable dismissal. 

To enter the freshman class the applicant must be not 
less than fifteen years of age, and should be qualified to 
pass a satisfactory examination on the following subjects : 

1. Geography, and History of the United States. 

2. English — (a) An examination upon sentences contain- 
ing incorrect Euglish. (b) A composition giving evidence 
of satisfactory proficiency in spelling, punctuation, grammar, 
and division into paragraphs. 

I. Reading. The composition in 1898 will be upon sub- 
jects drawn from one or more of the following works in 
English Literature: (1) Hughes's Torn Brown at Rugby; 
(2) Southey's Life of Nelson; (3) Shakespeare's Julius Ccesar; 
(4) Longfellow's Evangeline; (5) Scott's Ivanhoe; (6) Shake- 
speare's Merchant of Veniee; (7; Irving's Sketch Book; (8) 
Macaulay's Essay on Milton; (9) Scott's Marmion; (10) 

Dickens's David Copperfield. 

The candidate will be required to present evidence ^f a 

general knowledge of the subject matter, and to answer 

simple questions on the lives of the authors. This part of 

the examination is intended to test only a general knowledge 

at the substance of the books. 
II. Study and Practice. This part of the examination 

presupposes the thorough study of the style of the work. 

This part of the examination will be upon Julius Ccesar and 

the Essay on Milton. 

Preparation and examination on these ivorks will be necessary 
before the student is classed as regular in any course. 

3. Mathematics-(a) Arithmetic, including fundamental 
operations; common and decimal fractions; denominate 
numbers; the metric system ; percentage, including interest 
and discount; proportion ; extraction of square 6 and cube 
roots, (b) Algebra to quadratic equations, one book of 
geometry. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 33 

Those applicants who desire to continue the study of 
Latin should be qualified to pass a satisfactory examination 
in Latin grammar and the first two books of Ceesar, in addi- 
tion to the above subjects. 

For admission to the higher classes, students should be 
prepared to stand a satisfactory examination in all of the 
studies of the lower classes, as shown in the courses of 
study. Where opportunity has not been offered to pursue 
special studies required at this College, the system of equiv- 
alents will be adopted, and studies which denote an 
equivalent amount of discipline and training will be accepted 
as satisfactory. But if not prepared to pass an examination 
in history and chemistry at the time of application, the 
applicant will be required before graduation to pass a satis- 
factory examination on those subjects. 

ADMISSION ON CERTIFICATE. 

Applicants will be admitted without examination on presenting a 
certificate from any of the certificate schools named^herein. 

The following educational institutions having made application to 
be correlated to this College and having presented an approved 
course of study, are hereby declared to be certificate schools, and 
are granted the privilege set forth in the following resolution : 

-Students from certificate schools will ^^^^SSS^ 
'Class without examination upon the certificate i of. thfi > W~£ 
"pi incipal showing definitely that such students have ;comF)let^ satis 
"factory all the studies requiredfor admission, as stated in the cata 
"logue, and are otherwise admissible." 

CERTIFICATE SCHOOLS. 

University Military School, Mobile. : ' # "--' wVSISL 

*Verner Military Institute, Tuscaloosa. W . it . v erne . 

•University School, Montgomery J- £" ™" / 

*Mt. Willing High School, Mt. Willing J- J^T 

State Normal SchooJ, Jacksonville £ ? & ^ 

Male Academy, Huntsville ' 

•State Normal College, Florence l Ycockrell 

Furman Academy. Livingston •••• j M gmallw00(L 

High School, Opelika • } B Murphy . 

Union Springs Institute. .. ' 

' J^T^TT^^oDhomore class on approved cer- 

•Applicants are admitted to tne sopnumu 

tificates from these institutions. 
3 



X 







34 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

» 

University Military School, Clan ton E. Y. McMorries. 

N. A. Agricultural School, Athens M. K. Clements. 

% Ala. Agricultural School, Hamilton Jas. E. Alexander. 

Eutaw Male Academy, Eutaw. H..C. Horton 

Boys' High School, Anniston . . ..H. C. Gunnels. 

Taylor's School, Birmingham W. P.Taylor. 

Gaylesville High School John L. Ray. 

Carrollton Academy L - v Rosser. 

Ninth District Agricultural School, Blountsville..W. J. Beeson. 

Gadsden High School, ...... I. W. Hill. 

Boyd High School, Ramer B. H. Boyd. 

Dadeville High School A. W. Holstun and 

J. D. Lane. 

ADMISSION OF YOUNG WOMEN. 

The privilege of becoming students in this College is 
granted by the Trustees to young women of mature mind 
and character, on the following conditions : 

The applicant must be eighteen years of age, and if a 
candidate for a degree, be able to pass a satisfactory exam- 
ination in e/ich of the four subjects as named below. 

If the applicant is a candidate fop admission as a special 
or irregular student, she must be able to pass a satisfactory 
examination in two of the subjects named. 

(a) In English — Proficiency in spelling and punctuation ; 
Grammar (Lock wood- Whitney); Rhetoric (Lockwood's Les- 
sons and Genung's Outlines of Rhetoric) ; Scudder's Mas- 
terpieces of American Literature ; Syle's From Milton to 
Tennyson. 

For requirements in reading in literature see page 32. 

(b) In History — Macy's Our Government; Chambers's 
History of the United States ; Myers's General History. 

(c) In Mathematics — Arithmetic; Algebra, including 
quadratic equations, logarithms and series ; Plane and Solid 
Geometry; Plane and Analytical Trigonometry, as in Went- 
worth. 

(d) In Latin— Grammar, including the forms and syntax ; 
Jones's Latin Prose Composition ; translation pf selections 



<L 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



35 



from Caesar, Nepos, Virgil, Cicero's Orations, Cicero's Let- 
ters, or the equivalent. 

The equivalents of these subjects, as in above text-books, may 
be substituted. 

Botany will constitute a required part of the general 
course for young women who are candidates for a degree. 

When admitted, upon complying with the conditions 
above stated, they may enter upon the study of any subject 
taught in the College and join any class, for which, upon 
examination, they may be found qualified. The only con- 
dition imposed will be that they engage in earnest study, 
and attend the exercises regularly. They will board in the 
town with private families and attend college only at the 
hours of their exercises. 

The Trustees authorize the Faculty to admit a candidate 
for a degree at the age of seventeen, provided she is able to 
comply with all the requirements for admission in the four 
subjects named and the application meets with its approval. 

• 

ENTEANCE EXAMINATIONS. 

Entrance examinations will be held on Wednesday, the 
15th of September, the day on which the session opens. 
Candidates will also be examined during the session, when 
application is made for admission. 

Applicants who are not prepared to stand the entrance 
examinations for full admission to the freshman class are 
admitted to the sub-college department. 

They will be advanced to full admission to fe freshman 
class when they are quaked to pass satisfactorily the 
required examinations. 

• „i o<- Anhnrn will report immediately to 

class previous to matriculation. 

NUMBER OF EXERCISES REQUIRED. 
All students are reared to have , not ££•£" «*££ 

per week, or their ^^^fj^^i d itional exercises 
tory work, drawing, and military drill. 




36 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



occupy not less than twelve hours per week, and in all give twenty- 
seven to thirty hours per week required in college exercises. 

Special and Irregular Students. 

The privilege of electing studies in the lower classes is 
not gran^d to young students nor to their parents. The 
Faculty will assign a student, on admission, to that class of 
a prescribed course for which he is qualified ; and for special 
reasons, approved by the Faculty, he may be permitted to 
become irregular. 

Students qualified to prosecute the studies of the junior 
class, and those over twenty-one years of age that are not 
candidates for a degree, are permitted to take, with the 
advice of the Faculty, the subjects of study for which they 
may be qualified. 

A student who does not take all the studies in a class of one of the 
degree courses, as prescribed in the catalogue, and is permitted to 
take an irregular course, will be assigned to a member of the* Faculty 
who ,w,IJ act as his special adviser, and when his course of study has 

IZTtZ™ t ' the FaCUUy n ° ° ther Cha "* e Wil1 be Pe™*tted 
without the endorsement of his adviser 

te^'SS Wh ° fa " ^r S satisfactor y final examinations 

egS st u den f s y i eCOme 8PeCia ' StUde " t8 - They wil1 be c,assed * 
regular students pursmng a course for a degree, whenever thev M „ 

d P en S cien e t. eXaminati0n8 '° *™ ^'^ '" which ^etelouZ 
Students, candidates for a degree, who are not in full standine in 

and their na.es are J^ n 7^ZlT "^ ° f 8tUd '' e8 ' 

ADMISSION TO HIGHER CLASSES 

-£« .5E2 iSSSSXSt^ sub - fr ? man c,ass 

sion to the freshman class in histo y EnS' ^3ffl? " ?""* 
and if his examination is muj^f^^^ '^ 
adm.tted to the freshman class in that'subject onlv *'" * 

regular degree courses, can enter, wthou con di In SZ ,T ° f ?* 
in any course, except in the general course or thJ hejumor cl **> 
macy, in.which Latin is required ° UrSe in phar " 



> 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 37 

Students who are admitted to the junior class from other institu- 
tions, on examination in English, Latin, and mathematics, and who 
have not completed all the studies of the sophomore class, in order to 
graduate, will be required to complete the course in chemistry and 
history as taught in the sophomore class. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

The courses of study include the Physical, Chemical, 
and Natural Sciences, with their applications ; Agriculture ; 
Biology; Mechanics; Astronomy, Mathematics, Drawing; 
Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering; Physiology 
and Veterinary Science; Pharmacy; English, French, Ger- 
man A and Latin Languages ; History, Political Economy; 
Mental and Moral Sciences. 

These studies are arranged in regular courses so as to 
offer a liberal and practical education as a preparation for 
the activer pursuits of life. 

There are five degree courses for undergraduates, each 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science (B. Sc.) and 
requiring four years for its completion : 
I. Course in Chemistry and Agriculture. 

II Course in Civil Engineering. 

III. Course in Electrical and Mechanical Engineering. 

IV. General Course. 

V. Course in Pharmacy. 

There are also two partial courses, each requiring two 
years for its completion : 
VI. Two-Year Course in Agriculture. 
VII.' Two- Year Course in Mechanic Arts. 

Course I includes theoretical and practical instruction in 
th^e branches that relate to chemistry and agriculture, 
and is especially adapted to those who propose to devote 
themselves to agriculture and chemical pursuits 



W"' 



38 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



applications of the sciences, a special course in the applica- 
tions of electricity and mechanics, and is arranged for the 
profession of electrical and mechanical engineering. 

Course IV has been arranged to give a general and less 
technical education in subjects of science and language to 
meet the wants of those students who have selected no 
definite vocation in life, as well as of those who propose ulti- 
mately to engage in teaching or in some commercial or 
professional business. 

Course V includes, besides the general education of course 
IV in the lower classes, a special course in pharmacy and 
chemistry, and is adapted to those who expect to become 
pharmacists, manufacturing chemists, or to enter upon the 
study of medicine. ^ 

Courses VI and VII have been arranged for the benefit of 
thos* students who, for reasons satisfactory to themselves, 
are unable to continue at college four years and to take one 
of the regular degree courses. 



A student who completes satisfactorily all the work of the senior 
class in a department, including the laboratory work, will be awarded 
a certificate of proficiency in said subject. 

Students who complete either of the two-year courses will, on pass- 
ing a satisfactory examination, receive certificates indicating their 
attainments. 

No degree or certificate of proficiency will be given in any course 
unless the applicant has passed a satisfactory examination in ele- 
mentary English. 

Declamation and themes or orations are required of all regular 
students pursuing courses leading to a degree. 

POST-GRADUATE COURSES. 

The post-graduate degrees are— Master of Science, Mining 
Engineer, Civil Engineer, Electrical and Mechanical 
Engineer, and Pharmaceutical Chemist. 

A more extended post-graduate course of study may be 
taken by a graduate of this College or of any other institu- 
tion of equal grade. The completion of a course which 



, I 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



39 



leads to a post-graduate degree requires one year's residence 
at the College, spent in the satisfactory prosecution of a 
course of study, with such laboratory work as may be ap- 
proved by the Faculty. 

The candidate must also present to the Faculty a satisfactory thesis 
showing independent investigation upon some subject pertaining to 
their course, and must pass an examination at the close of each term 
on the course of study prescribed, in which he must attain a grade of 
75 per cent'. The examination is written, and also oral in the pres- 
ence of the Faculty. 

The subject of the thesis must be submitted to the Faculty for ap- 
proval prior to January 1st, and the thesis be given to the professor 
by April 1st. 

Applicants for post-graduate degrees are, by order of the Trustees, 
permitted to matriculate without payment of fees. 

They are subject to the general regulations as other students, but 
are exempt from all military duty. 

Resident graduates that are not candidates for a degree, are per- 
mitted to matriculate and prosecute the studies in any department 
of the College, without payment of regular fees. 

The following courses are prescribed for the degrees named: 

Mining Engineer. — Students who have received the degree of B. Sc. 
in engineering, civil, or electrical and mechanical, or who have prose- 
cuted an equivalent course of study, can enter upon a special course 
of mining engineering, which includes the following subjects of 

study ; 

Industrial Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry, Assaying, Reduction 
of Ores, Mineralogy, Economic Geology, with practical work in the 
field, Mining Machinery with the applications of steam and elec- 
tricity to the various operations connected wifh the exploitation of 

mines. 

The student, if a candidate for a degree, will also be required to 
prosecute the necessary studies in that course of engineering in 
which he has not graduated . 

This course of study will be under the charge of the professors of 
geology, chemistry, civil and electrical and mechanical engineering. 

Civil Engineer. —Civil Engineering, Mathematics, Analytical Me- 
chanics. 

Electrical and Mechanical Engineer. -Electrical Engineering, Me- 
chanical Engineering. 

Pharmaceutical Chemist— Pharmacy and Chemistry. 

Master of Science. -Studies in three departments, in two of which 
the candidate must have previously completed the full course of the 

senior class. ** ' ' 

A certificate of proficiency will be given when any one subject of a 
post-graduate course is satisfactorily completed. 



207881 



40 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



■v 



SPECIAL ONE- YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 

Young men over twenly-one years of age who desire to study agri- 
s culture will be permitted, without examination, to enter any class 
under the professor of agriculture, and will be excused from reciting 
in any other class, from military duty, and from all other college 
duties ; but will be under the general college regulations, and will be 
required to have their time fully occupied. 

They may attend the lectures in agriculture in all the classes and 
engage in the practical work at the experiment station, in the field, 
stock-yard, dairy* garden, orchard, vineyard, etc., and may thus, in 

one year, acquire valuable practical knowledge of scientific agricul- 
ture. 

PHOTOGRAPHY. 

During the session there will be given by Professor Mell a course 
of twelve lectures on photography. This course will be elective, and 
the instruction will be open to any student that may desire to learn 
how to make pictures. It will be necessary for each student to pro- 
vide himself with an outfit that will cost from $11.50 to $16.00. 

LABOBATORY INSTRUCTION. 

,. Laboratory instruction constitutes an important feature 
in the courses of education provided for the students of 
this College, and as far as possible all students are required 
to enter upon laboratory work in some one department. 

Laboratory instruction and practical work are given in the 
following-departments: e 

I. 
It 
III. 
IV. 
V. 
VI 
VII. 
VIII. 
IX. 
X. 
XL 
XII. 
XIII. 



Chemistry. 

Civil- Engineering, Field Work, Surveying Etc 
Agriculture. 9 :^™ 

Botany. 

Mineralogy. 
Biology. 

Technical Drawing. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Physics. 

Electrical Engineering. 
Mechanical Engineering. 

Physiology and Veterinary Science 
Pharmacy. 

Nom-Special work in English or iTicf^ 

** n ... p^ ^ .t^tfiSS' * ,u " 



<, 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



41 



COLLEGE GYMNASIUM AND ATHLETIC FIELD. 

The gymnasium is situated at the west end of the athletic 
and drill grounds, and contains one room, 80x40 feet, with 
strong beams above for fastening the usual fixtures. 

It is equipped with Spalding's gymnasium apparatus and 
is open to all students at stated hours, under the care of an 
officer. 

The athletic field has a quarter-mile cinder track and 
ample space for football, baseball, and general athletics. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The government of the College is administered by the President 
and Faculty, in accordance with the code of laws and regulations en- 
acted by the Trustees. 

Attention to study and punctuality in attendance on recitations 
and all other duties, are required of every student. Students are 
prohibited from having in their possession arms or weapons not issued 
for the performance of military duty, and also from using, or causing 
to be brought into the college limits, intoxicating liquors. 

Students are not permitted to participate in any public entertain- 
ment, or game, without previously obtaining the consent of the 
Faculty. 

No cadet will be permitted, without the approval of his parent or 
guardian, to take part in a public game of football ; nor will per- 
mission be given in any instance to a student deficient in his studies. 

MILITARY DRILL. 

There are three regular military drills each week, and all under- 
graduate students, not physically incapacitated to bear arms, are 
required to engage in these exercises . 

The drills are short, and the duty involves no hardships. The mili- 
tary drill is a health-giving exercise, and its good effects in the devel- 
opment of the physique and improvement of the carriage of the cadet 
are manifest. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICES. 

Religious services are held every morning in the chapel. 
All students are required to attend these exercises, and also to at- 
tend the church of their choice at least once on Sunday. 
Opportunities are also offered for attending Bible classes every 

Sunday. 



."■? 



42 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

This Association is regularly organized and has a well furnished 
room on the first floor of the College building set apart for its exclu- 
sive use. Through its weekly meetings it exerts a wholesome Chris- 
tian influence among the students of the College. 

Students are advised to unite with the Association when they enter 
College. 

The following are the officers : 

N. C. Smith, President. 

W. S. Garner, Vice-President. 

H. C. Ray, Corresponding Secretary. 

J. W. King, Recording Secretary. 

J. M. Atkinson, Treasurer. 

LOCATION. 

The College is situated in the town of Auburn, fifty-nine miles east 
of Montgomery, on the line of the Western Railroad. 

The region is high and healthful, noted for its general good health 
and freedom from malaria, having an elevation of eight hundred and 
twenty-six feet above tide water. By statute of the State, the sale of 
spirituous liquors and keeping saloons of any kind are forbidden. 

BOARDING. 

The College has no barracks or dormitories, and the students board 
with families in the town of Auburn and thus enjoy all the protecting 
and beneficial influence of the family circle. 



s 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



43 



I— COUKSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 



The numerals opposite 

First Term. 
5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y 
3. Military Drill . 

First Term. 
3. English. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y 

2. Physiology. 

3. Military Drill. 



the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 

FRESHMAN CLAS3. 

Second Term. Third Term. 

5. English. 5. English. 

2. History. 3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 5. Mathematics. 

. 3. Elementary Physics. 2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Second Term. Third Term. 

3. English. 

3. Botany (a). 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

2. Agriculture (b). 

3. Drawing 



3. English. 

3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry 

2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing 



6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

2. Physiology. 2. Physiology. 

3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

3. English. 
3. Physics. 



Just Term. --wowfit-^wwir Third Term. 

3. English. •' • " 3. English. v 3. English. 

3. Physics. 3. Physics. / 3. Physics, 



Indus trial Qh emistry 

2. Agriculture. 

4. Botany (Lab'y). 

1. Military Tactics. 
9. Chemical Lab'y. 

2. Vete rinary Scienc e. 

3. Military Drill. 



2. Agriculture. 2. Agriculture (b). 

4. Botany (Lab'y). 4. Botany (Lab'y). 

1. Military Tactics. 1. Military Tactics. 
9. Chemical Lab'y. 9. Chemical Lab'y. 

2. Veterinary Science. 2. Veterinary Scienc e . 

3. Military tfrHT. 3. Military Drill 



SENIOR CLASS. 
Second Term. Third Term. 

2. PoliticalEconomy(c).2. Political Economy. 
2. Mental Science 4d). 2. Mental Science (d). 
2. Astronomy. 2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 2 - Geology. 

5. Biology. 5. Biology. 

2.' AgricuLr'lCh'm'try.2. Agricultur'lCh'm'try.2. Agricultur'l Ch'm'try . 

1. Military Science. 1. Military Science. 2. Military Science. 
9. Chemical Lab'y. 9. Chemical Lab'y. 9. Chemical Lab y. 

2. Veterin aryScience. 2 : Je^erinarySden ae. 2. Veterinary Science. 
(a) Begins Marxist (bTAlsTPr^tical Agriculture. 

. (9) Begins Feb. Uth. (d) Germftu W * substituted. % 



First Term. 
2. English Literature. 
2. Men taf Science (d). 
2. Physics. 
2. Geology. 
5. Biology. 



u 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



II-COURSE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Second Term. 

5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 
3. Elementary Physics. 3. Elementary Physics. 2. Agriculture. 
3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. * 3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y 



First Term. 
5. English. 
2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



Third Term. 
5. English. 
3. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



3. Military Drill. 

First Term. 
3. English. 
3. History. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 
2. Agriculture (b) 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 



3. Military Drill. 
SOPHOMORE CLASS. 
Second Term. 
3. English. 
3. History. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 
2. Agriculture (b). 
2. Physiology. 



6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

Third Term. 
3. English. 
3. Botany (a). 
5. Mathematics. ' 
3. General Chemistry. 
2. Agriculture (b). 
2. Physiology. 
3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y 
3. Military Drill. 3 ; Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 
First Term. Second Term. Third Term 

3. English, French, or 3. Engl/sh, French, or 3. English, French or 

German. German. 

3. Physics. 
5. Mathematics. 
5. Civil Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 
1. Military Tactics. 
6. ^y,Mech.Arts(c)6. Lab'y, Mech. Arts (c). 6. hSf^XS^m^ 
1. Field Work Engin'g. 2. Field Work, Engin'g. 2. Field Work, Engin'g. 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

SENIOR CLASS. 
First Term. Second Term. ^ Third Term 

2. English Literature(d)2. Political Economy(d).2. Political Economy(d). 
2. Physics. 2 . Astronomy. 2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 2. Geology. 2 . Geology 



German . 
3. Physics. 
5. Mathematics. 
5. Civil Engineering 
5. Drawing. 
1. Military Tactics. 



3. Physics. 

5. Mathematics. 

5. Civil Engineering. 

5. Drawing. 

1. Military Tactics. 



3. Mathematics 



2 
2 
3. Mathematics. 



3. Mathematics. 



(a) Begin 8 March 1st. 

(b) For Agriculture may be substituted Physical Laboratory. 

(c) Or Mineralogy. 

(d) For Eog. Lit. and Pol. Econ. may be substituted French or German. 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



45 



5. Civil Engineering. 5. Civil Engineering. 5. Civil Engineering. 

5. Drawing. 5. Drawing. 5. Drawing. 

1. Military Science. 1. Military Science. 1. Military Science. 

4. Mech. Eng., Lab'y. 4. Mech. Eng., Lab'y. 4. Mech Eng., Lab'y. 
Field Work, Engin'g. Field Work, Engin'g. Field Work, Engin'g 



III.— COUKSE IN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL 

ENGINEERING. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 
In freshman and sophomore classes the same studies are prescribed as 
in Course II in^Civil Engineering. 

JUNIOR CLASS. • ' 



First Term. 

3. English, French, or 
German. 

3. Physics. 

5. Mathematics. 

4. Electrical Engin'g. 
3. Mech. Engineering. 



Second Term. 

3. English, French, or 
German. 

3. Physics. 

5. Mathematics. 

4. Electrical Engin'g. 
3. Mech. Engineering. 



Third Term. 

3. English, French, or 
German. 

3. Physics. 

5. Mathematics. 

4. Electrical Engin'g. 
3. Mech. Engineering. 



4. Mechanical Drawing. 4 Mechanical Drawing. 4. Mechanical Drawing. 



4. Electrical Lab'y. 
6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 

1. Military Tactics. 
3. Military Drill. 

■v. 
First Term. 

2. Eng. Literature (a). 
2. Physics. 

2. Geology. 

3. Mathematics. 

5. Electrical Engin'g. 



4. Electrical Lab'y. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 

1. Military Tactics. 

3. Military Drill. 



Third Term, 



4. Electrical Lab'y. 
6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 

1. Military Tactics. 
3. Military Drill. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 

2. Political Economy (a).2. Political Economy (a). 
2. Astronomy. 2- Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 2. Geology. 

3. Mathematics. 3. Mathematics. 

5. Electrical Engin'g 5. Electrical Engin'g. 
5. Mech. Engineering. 5. Mech. Engineering. 



5. Mech. Engineering. 
2. Electrical Designing. 2. Electrical Designing. 2. Llectnca Designing. 

6. Electrical Lab'y. 6. Electrical Lab'y. 6. Electrical Lab y. 
4. Mech. Eng. Lab'y. 4. Mech. Eng. Lab'y. 4. Mech. Eng. Lab y. 
1. Military Sci ence. 1 . Milita i^denc^_^_ Military Science. 

(a) French'or German may be substituted. 



w 



46 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 
IV.— GENERAL COURSE. 



The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the numbers of hours per week. 



First Term. 

3 English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

5. Latin. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

8. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

First Term. 

3. English. 
3. Physics., 
3. Mathematics. 
3. French. 
3. German. 
3. Latin. 

1. Military Tactics. 
6. Lab'y Work (b). 
3. Military Drill. 

First Term. 

2. English Literature. 
2. Mental Science. 

2. Physics. 

2. Geology. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1. Military Science. 
6. Lab'y Work (b). 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 
Second Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 
Second Term. ; 
5. Latin. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

. JUNIOR CLASS. 
Second Term. 
3. English. 
3. Physics. 
3. Mathematics. 
3. French. 
3. German. 
3. Latin. 

1. Military Tactics. 
6. Lab'y Work (b). 
3. Military Drill. 

SENIOR CLASS, 
Second Term. 



c 



Third Term. 

3. English. 
3. History. 
3. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 
3. Drawing. 

2. Agriculture. 

6. Mechanic Arts. 

3. Military Drill. 

Third Term. 
5. Latin. 
3. Botany (a). 

5. Mathsmatics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 
3. English. 
3. Physics. 
3. Mathematics. 
3. French. 
3. German. 
3. Latin. 

1. Military Tactics. 
6. Lab'y Work (b). 
3. Military Drill. 

Third Term. 



2. Political Economy (c).2. Political Economy 



2. Mental Science 
2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1. Military Science. 
6. Lab'y Work (b). 



2. Mental Science. 
2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1. Military Science. 
6 Lab'y Work (b). 



(&) Begins March 1st. 

he £1 SifiSSj ^ 6,eCt ^ lab0 ' ator ' of » n * ^Partment for which 
(c) Begins February 15th. 



^ 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



47 



V.— COURSE IN PHARMACY. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 



First Term, 

3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y 
3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

5. Latin. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Genejral-Chemistry . 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



3. 
6. 
4. 
3. 



First Term. 

3. Physics. 

6. Chemical Lab'y. 

4. Botanical Lab'y. 

3. Pharmacy. 
9. Pharmaceutical Lab. 9. 

4. Pharmacognosy. 4. 
1. Military Tactics. 1. 

3. Military Drill. 3. 

First Term. 

5. Biology. 5. 

7. Toxicology. 6- 

4. Pharmacy. 4. 
9. Pharmaceutical Lab. 9. 
4. Pharmacognosy. 4. 
1. Military Science. 1. 
3. Materia Medica. 3. 

(a) Begins March 1st. 



Second Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing.? 

6. Mech. Art. Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Second Term. 

5. Latin. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. GeneralChemistry. 
i. Physiology. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 

Physics. 
Chemical Lab'y. 
Botanical Lab'y. 
Pharmacy. 
Pharmaceutical Lab. 
Pharmacognosy. 
Military Tactics. 
Military Drill. 

SENIOR CLASS. 
Second Term. 

Biology. 
Chemical Lab'y. 

Pharmacy. 
Pharmaceutical Lab. 
Pharmacognosy. 
Military Science. 
Materia Medica. 



Third Term. 

3. English. 
3. History. 
3. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 
3. Drawing. 

2. Agriculture. 

6. Mechanic Arts. 

3. Military Drill. 

Third Term. 

5. Latin. 

3. Botany, (a) 

5. Mathematics. 

3. GeneralChemistry. 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

3. Physics. 

6. Chemical Lab'y. 

4. Botanical Lab'y. 

3. Pharmacy. 

9. Pharmaceutical Lab 

4. Pharmacognosy. 
1. Military Tactics. 

3. Military Drill. 

Third Term. 

5. Biology. 

6. Chemical Lab'y. 

4. Pharmacy. 

9. Pharmaceutical Lab 

4. Pharmacognosy. 

1. Military Science. 

3. Bacteriology. 




S 



* J?> 



C^ 




48 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

VI.-TWO--TEAK COURSE IN MECHANIC ARTS. 



First Term. 

5. English. 
2. Hi3tory. 
5. Mathematics. 



FIRST YEAR. 

Second Term. 

5. English. 
2. History. 
5. Mathematics 



Third Term. 

5. English. 
3. History. 
5. Mathematics. 

2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing, 



3. Elementary Physics. 3. Elementary Physics. 

3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab 'v 

3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Second Term 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Physics .- 
10 „ u . 5 - Drawing. ' w ^ w .««. 

; Mr, mC / r n Laby 12 Mech ^ic Art Lab'y. 12. Mechanic Art Lab'y 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

VII.-TWO-YEAR COUESE IN AGRICULTURE. 

FTRST YEAR. 

Second Term, 

5 English. 
2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



First Term. 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 
3. Drawing, 



Third Term. 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 
3 Drawing. 



First Term. 

5. English. 
2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



3. Elementary Physics. 3. Elementary Physics 
3. Drawing. 3. Drawing 



Third Term. 

5 English. 
3. History. 
5. Mathematics. 

2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 
4. MechamcAr Lab'y. 4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 4. Mechanic Art Lab'y 
3. M.litary Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3 Militarv Drill 
2. Practical Agricult're. 2. Practical Agriculture. 2. Practical Agricult're. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Second Term. Third Term. 

3. English. 3 . EngHgh 

5. Mathematics. 5 . Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 3. General Chemistry. 

Agncu ture. 4 . Agriculture. 

Physmlogy. 2 . Phys j ology 

? ?n M A8 ;r"'" a ; ££355^ SSffis 

S. M.l.Urj D„ll. S. Mili,.r,Drt]l. ». Mllto., dST 



First Term. 

3. English. 

5. Mathematics^ 

3. General Chemistry 

4. Agriculture. 
2. Physiology. 

2. Veterinary Science. 



4 
2 
2. 



SCHEDULE OF EXERCISES. 



HOURS 



I. 

8-9 



MONDAY 



4 Algebra. 
3. Latin. 

L. and 2 Drawing. 
L. Elec.EngineVg 
2. Mec. EngineVg 
I. Biology. 
1. German. 



II. 
9-10 



TUESDAY 



3. Physiology. 

4. Geometry. 
3. Latin. 

2. German. 

I and 2 Drawing. 

2. Botany. 

1. Elec. EngineVg 

2. Mec. EngineVg 
1. Mental Science. 



WEDNESDAY 



4. Algebra. 
3. Latin. 

1 and 2 Drawing. 
1. Vet. Science. 
1. Elec EngineVg. 
1. German. 



4. English. 

3 Chemistry. 

2. Civ. Engineer'g 

2 Latin. 

1. Calculus. 

1. Biology. 

2. Elec EngineVg. 



4. History. 
3. Agriculture. 
2 Civ. Engineer'g 
i. Botany. 

1. Physics. 

2. Elec. EngineVg 



4. English. 
3. Chemistry. 
2. Civ. Engineer'g 
2. Latin. 

1. Calculus. 

2. Vet. Science. 

2. Elec. EngineVg 



III. 

10-11 



3. English. 

> PhveJcS. 



THURSDAY 



4. Geometry. 

3. Latin. 

2. German. 

I and 2 Drawing. 

2. Botany. 

1. Mental Science. 

L. Elec. EnginVg 



4. Algebra. 
3. Latin. 

1 and 2 Drawing. 
1. Veterinary Sci. 
1. Elec. EngineVg 
1. German. 



4. History. 
3. Agriculture. 
2. Civ. EngineVg. 
2. Botany, 

1. Physics. 

2. Elec. EngineVg 



3. History (1, 2). 3. English. 
3. Botany (2, 3). 



1. Civ. EngineVg. 

t, Biology. 

L. Latin. 

1. Mec. EngineVg. 



1. Biology 

L. Civ.Engineeri'g 

4. English. 



2. Physics. 
1, Latin 



3. History ((1, 2). 

3. Botany (2,3). 

1. Civ. Engineer'g 

4. English 



FRIDAY 



SATURDAY 



Exercises inElocution. 



4. English. 
3. Chemistry. 
2. Civ. EngineVg. 
2. Latin. 

1. Calculus. 

2. Mech. KnginVg 
2. Vet. Science. 



Military Drill. 



3. English. 
2. Physics . 



2. French 

2. Mech. Drawing. 



1 Civ. Engineer'g.il. Mech. Engin'r'g 
1. Biology. T2. ' 

1. Mech. EnginVg> 



Mec. EngineVg 1. Biology^ XJ2. French A 



Mechanic Arts. 

Chemical Laboratory. 

Electrical Laboratory. 
1. Civ. Engineer'g. Physical Laboratory. 

(Veterinary Clinics. 
4. History (3). 'Biological Laboratory. 
I. Mech. Engin'r'giField Engineering. 



o 







■■ 



.r 



s: 



SCHEDULE OF EXEECISES— Continued. 



ot 



HOURS 



IV. 



11-12 




MONDAY 



4. Physics (1,2). 



4. Agriculture (3) 
4. Latin (1,2). 

3. Drawing. 

■2. Mathematics. 
2. Chemistry. 
[.English (1,2). 
i. Pol. Econ (2,3) 

4. Mechanic Arts. 



TUESDAY 



4. Latin. 
3. Drawing. 

2. Agriculture. 
2. Mathematics. 
1. Chemistry. 
1. French., 



V. 



.12-1 



P.M. 

VI, VII. 
2-4 



4. Drawing. 

3. Mathematics. 
2. English. 

4. Mechanic Arts. 
1. Elec. Designi'g 
1. French. 



h 



4. Physics (1,2). 
4. Latin (3). 
3. History (1,2). 
3. Botany (2, 3). 
2. Mathematics. 
2. Chemistry. 
I.English (1, 2). 
1. Political Econ- 
omy (2, 3). 
4 Mechanic Arts. 



3 Mathematics. 
2. English. 
1. Geology. 



4. Mechanic Arts. 

3. Field Work, Agr. 
1 & 2 Laboratory, 
Chemistry. 
1 & 2 Field Work, 
Engineering. 
l&2Mach. Work. 
Elec. Lab. Work. 
Physical Labor' y. 



3. Mechanic Arts. 
2. Mineralogy 

Laboratory. 

Military Drill (*). 

1. Mech. Lab'tory. 
Elec. Lab'y Work. 
1 and 2 History. 



WEDNESDAY 



THURSDAY 



4. Latin. 

2. Agriculture. 

2. Mathematics. 
1. Chemistry. 

3. Physiology. 
1. French. 



FRIDAY 



4. Drawing. 

3. Mathematics. 

4. Mechanic Arts. 

2. German. 

1. iSlec. Designing. 

2. Anal.Chemist'y 
4. Mechanic Arts 

3. Field Work,Agr. 
1 & 2 Laboratory, 

Chem. 
1 & 2 Field W'rk, 
Engineering. 
l&2Mach. Work. 
Ex'cis. in Elocut'n 
Elec. Lab. Work. 
Physical Labor'yi 



3. Mathematics. 
2. English. 
1. Gfeology. 



4. Physics (1, 2). 

4. Agriculture (3). 
4. Latin (1,2). 

3. Drawing. 

2. Mathematics. 
2.JJfTemistry. 

1. Military Science 

4. Mechanic Arts. 



4. Drawing. 

3. Mathematics. 

-V 

4. Mechanic Arts 

1. Elec. Designing 

2. Miliary Tactics. 



3. Mechanic Arts. 
2. Mineralogy 

Laboratory. 

Military Drill (*). 

1. Mech. Labor'y. 
Elec. Lab'y Work. 
1 and 2 History. 



SATURDAY 



3. Mechanic Arts. 
Chemical Laboratory. 
Electrical Laboratory. 
Physical Laboratory. 
Veterinary Clinics. 
Biological Laboratory. 
Field Engineering. 



3. Mechanic Arts. 
Chemical Laboratory. 
Electrical Laboratory. 
Physical Laboratory. 
Veterinary Clinics. 
Biological Laboratory. 
Field Engineering. 



4. Mechanic Arts. 

3. Field W'rk Agr. 
2. French. 
I & 2 Lab. Chem. 
1 & 2 Field W'rk, 
Engineering. 
1 & 2 Mach. W'rk. 
Ex'cis. in Elocut'n 
Elec. Lab. Work. 
Physical Labor'y. 



Chapel services daily at 7:45 a. m, 

Numbers prefixed denote classes — 1 denotes senior, 2 junior, etc. 

*From 4:30 to 5:30 p. m. 



Numbers affixed — (1), (2), (3), — denote terms. 



__ 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION. 



PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY. 

PRESIDENT BROUN. 
PROFESSOR^)McKISSICK. 

The instruction is given by recitations from text-books 
and lectures, illustrated by experiments. The first part of . 
the course is occupied with elementary rational mechanics, 
treated graphically. 

This [is followed by a full discussion of molecular me- 
chanics ; while due prominence is given to principles, fre- 
quent reference is made to the applications of science. 

The studies of the junior class include the properties of 
matter, units of measure, force, work, energy, kinematics, 
kinetics, mechanic powers, friction, pendulum, molecular 
forces of solids, liquids and gases, theory of undulations, 
heat, electricity, magnetism, etc. 

The studies of the senior class include optics and 
astronomy. 

Post-graduate Course. This includes the study of ana- 
lytical mechanics, and requires a knowledge of differential 
and integral calculus. 

PHYSICAL LABORATORY. 

Instructor H. H. Kyser. 
The laboratory work includes courses for the sophomore and fresh- 
man classes, and is so arranged as to begin with a study of the sys- 
tems and units of measurements and to conclude with simple experi- 
ments in heat. . , . , 
The student is required to ascertain experimentally various physical 
laws, hence in all exercises there is something to measure Urom 
hese measurements he is required to find the law. connecting the 
quantities involved. Results of experiments are to be entered, in 



52 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

tabular form, together with methods, diagrams, etc., in a laboratory 
record-book, which each student is required to prepare. At the close 
of each week this book is criticised and graded according to its accu- 
racy and neatness. 

Freshman Course. 

First Term, (a) Elementary physics (mechanics and heat). 
Second Term. (6) Elementary graphical statics (continued in 

sophomore year). 
Third Term, (c) Systems and units of measurements. 

(d) Simple measurements of length, surface, volume and weight. 

Sophomore Course. 

First Term, (a) Simple measurements and designing verniers and 
micrometers. 

(6) Elementary graphical statics, (c) Forces, moments and^ 
work. 

Second Term, {d) Simple machines and friction (determining me- 
chanical advantages, loss, efficiency, law, etc ). 

(e) Pendulum and gravity. (/) Elasticity. 

Third Term, (g) Liquids, (h) Density and specific gravity. ' (i) 
Gases. (/) Heat. 

The laboratory is equipped with instruments of foreign and Ameri- 
can manufacture, such as verniers, micrometers, cathttometers a 
horizontal comparator, a Rater's reversion pendulum, balances, etc., 
and with all apparatus necessarv to perform from 10 to 20 experiments 
under each of the above named groups. 



MATHEMATICS. 

PROFEbSOR SMITH. 

The general course for the first two years embraces the 
first year, algebra, through logarithms and geometry six 
books; second year, algebra, solid geometry, plane' and 
spherical trigonometry, surveying, mensuration. 

Two objects are sought to be attained : first, mental dis- 
cipline ; second, a thorough knowledge of the principles of 
pure mathematics and their practical applications. 

Theoretical and practical instruction is given to the 
sophomore class in farm, town and government land sur 
veying, dividing land, mapping, plotting, and computing 
areas, etc. ; also in the theory, adjustment ? nd use of instru- 
ments. 



) 






s 





\J 



BOTANICAL LABORATORY. 



J 



r 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 53 

The class, in sections of six or eight, devote three after- 
noons a week during the second and third terms to field 
practice. 

Mensuration includes, an extended course in measure- 
ments of heights and distances, plane, rectilinear, and 
curvilinear figures, surfaces and volumes. 

The completion of this course, common to all students, 
lays the foundation for the pure and applied mathematics 
of the mechanical and engineering courses. Analytical 
geometry, descriptive geometry, and calculus are pursued 
in the mechanical and engineering courses. Especial atten- 
tion is given to their practical applications. 

During the entire course, instruction in text-books is 
supplemented by lectures. Solutions of original practical 
problems are required of the student, to make him familiar 
with the application of the principles and formulas. 



'V 



Text-Books. 



Wentworth's Algebra, Wentworth's Geometry, Wentworth's Trigo- 
nometry and Surveying, Wentworth's Analytical Geometry, Fannce's 
Descriptive Geometry, Nicholson's Calculus, Johnson's Differential 
Equations, Osborne's Problems, Peck's Determinants. 



GEOLOGY AND BOTANY. / 

. ' TROFESSOK MELL. 

Geology.— Thi* * ibject is studied in the senior class, and 
extends through the entire session. Special attention is 
given to the geology of Alabama, and many illustrations 
are drawn from the'coal and iron fields and other natural 
deposits of minerals in the State. Mineral springs, the , 
origin of ore deposits, and the geological relations of soils 

are carefully studied. 

There is also a course of advanced work in practical geol- 
ogy for post-graduate students. ; This subject is pursued 
by applicants for the degrees of master of science and 

mining engineer. . 

The junior class in civil engineering studies mineralogy 
















54 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



through the entire session. This work consists of a thor- 
ough course in blow-pipe analysis of the ordinary minerals, 
and lectures upon crystallography, with instruction how to 
measure crystals and determine the physical constants of 
minerals. An effort is made to familiarize the student with 
all the economic ores and the rocks entering into the com- 
position of soils. 

Botany.— The students of the sophomore class begin the 
study of botany the first of March, and continue it through 
the session. Analytical work is made an important feature. 
This class is provided with plants from the fields, and 
taught how to determine their specific names. The work is 
sufficiently exhaustive to enable the student, after com- 
pleting the course, to name any of the ordinary weeds and 
grasses that he will encounter in this section. 

In the junior class, in the course of chemistry and agri- 
culture, two terms are devoted to systematic and structural 
botany, and to advanced laboratory work with the micro- 
scope in the preparation of specimens showing plant struct- 
ure; this work is sufficient to familiarize the students with 
the methods -of plant building and cellular organization. 
Excellent microscopes of the most improved patterns, and 
all necessary chemicals and apparatus for preparing and 
mounting vegetable tissues, are used by the students. 

The third term is devoted to the study of the physiology 
of plants in order to understand the functions of the various 
organs after completion of the work in the histological 
laboratory. 

FACILITIES FOR WORK. 

Geology.— The department is equipped with models of Mount 
Shasta, the earthquake of 1887 in Japan, glass crystals for teaching 
crystallography ; charts and maps of the geology of America and 
Europe ; Colt's lantern complete, with oil, oxy-hydrogen and auto- 
matic electric lamps; a large assortment of fine lantern slides rep- 
resenting geological formations in this cpuntry and abroad- well 
equipped mineralogical laboratory for thirty students, supplied with 
a collection of representative minerals ; and models of crystals. 

Botany. -Th* facilities for teaching this subject are as follows: 



j 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 55 

Auzoux's clastic models of seeds and flowers ; a large collection of 
pressed plants of Alabama and other sections, mounted and cata- 
logued. There is also a laboratory for practical work in botany 
equipped with slate-topped tables for twenty students ; dissecting and 
compound microscopes by Zeiss, Leitz, and Bausch & Lomb; projec- 
tion microscopic apparatus ; microtomes by King and Bausch & Lomb ; 
all the necessary glass ware and smaller dissecting instruments 
required in a well equipped laboratory. The Zeiss compound micro- 
scope used by the professor for experiment work in connection with 
the station is supplied with Abbe's illuminating apparatus, slide 
changers, Abbe's camera lucida polarizers, apochromatic objectives 
(16 mm, 8 mm, 4 mm, and homogeneous immersion), oculars (2, 3, 8, 
12 18, and photographic), eye-piece with micrometer. This labora- 
tory is well lighted with gas and electricity and with a good expos- 
ure for ample sunlight. . . , . 
In connection with the department there is a photographic dark 
room and an excellent photographic outfit consisting of cameras 
varying in size from 4 x 5 to 6^ x %% inches; Bausch & Lomb s pro- 
fessional photo-micro camera extending to eight feet; Ze iss s ana- 
stigmat photographic lens, 6^ x 8*, fitted with Bausch & Lomb's dia- 
E shutter, and Zeiss's wide angle lens, *% x 8* all mounted 
SE blark's lens fitted with «^^£S 
lens, i x 5; the accessory apparatus and chemicals required for nrst 
class work in photography. experi- 
The students have access to the botanica garden wher? expert 
ments in grass culture and many other plants of interest to the 
farmer are conducted by the professor. 

Text-Books. 

LeConte's Geology, Williams's ^t^^^S^ 

Geology, Dana's *^>«^£Z£*£% lectures. 
Plant Descriptions, Laboratory Guide, ana noies 

CIVIL ENGINEERING AND DRAWING. 

PROFESSOR LANE. 
- ; CI VIL ENGINEERING. 

lows: 



-^ 



56 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



Junior Class — Simple, compound, reversed and parabolic 
curves, turnouts and crossings, leveling, gradients, setting 
slope stakes, etc. 

Special attention will be paid in this class to the location 
reconstruction, drainage and maintenance of country roads; 
and the various pavements and foundations for the same. 

Senior Class— Classification, appearances, defects, season- 
ing, durability and preservation of timber; classification and 
description of natural building stones ; bricks and concretes ; 
cast and wrought-irou, steel and other metals; limes,' 
cements, mortars, and their manufacture ; paints and other 
preservatives; classification of strains and a general mathe- 
matical discussion of same; joints and fastenings; solid 
and open built beams ; classification, construction and me- 
chanics of masonry; foundations on land and in water- 
bridges and roofs of different kin/ls, their construction and 
strains determined mathematically- and graphically com- 
mon roads, their coverings, location and construction; loca- 
tion and construction of railroads ; navigable, irrigation, and 
drainage canals; river and sea-coast improvements 
Theory and practice are combined in both classes. 

Text-Books. 

Jupior Class.— Henck's Field Bonk fnr pVi ^ . 

Byrne's Highway Construction *™ Eng.neers and 

StaST (;,a88 - Wheeler ' 8 <** Engineering and Von Ott's Graphic 

DRAWING. 

a re A 11bedt r \ Dt8 ; f "? frCShman - dso Phon>ore classes 
engineering in the junior and senior classes. 

The freshman class is tanght linear and free-hand draw- 
ing. The sophomore class is instructed in the princ pies of 
orthographic and isometric projections thJtolT?* 
perspective and tinting In ,hi T • , d shadow8 > 

embraces a more extended Vn ' ^ in8truction 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 57 

tions of buildings, and blue prints. The senior class makes 
topographical drawings, and drawings of machines, roofs, 
brides, etc., to different scales, and blue prints. Plans, 
profile's and sections of railroad surveys complete the in- 
struction in this. department. 

Text-Books. 

Freshman Class.-Kitchener's Geometrical Note Book, Thome's 
Junior Course in Mechanical Drawing, and Davidson's Model Draw- 

'"sophomore Class.-Davidson's Projections, Davidson's Practical 
Perspective, Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. 

Junior Class-Davidson's Building Construction. Dav.dson^ Draw- 
i„g for Mechanics and Engineers, Plates belongmg to the College, 

K rent & ctr- F ?n" b EngH S h and American p.ates longing to 
the College, Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. 



ENGLISH AND POLITICAL ECONOMY. 

PROFESSOR THACH. 
OBJECTS AND METHODS. 
In this department the students pursue a systematic 

course in **g*^££T* knowledge; 
Language s the avenue o p P ^ 83 in 

the interpretation of words is tn 
education of whatsoever kind A full con se g 

therefore, considered ^pec* mpor^t in 
courses of study that do not « *»J to ^ 

Accordingly, the course fig**^ three hours a 
the four years of tbe ^ ol ^f all stud ents, with the 

W eek, and is made obliga to 7 J°» rs of the course 

exception of those pursuing the brsU y and 

in Latin. In this extended d ^ ^ afford 

ature of the English language, tie endeav 
a training somewhat equivalent to the 
the classical languages. 



68 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



In view of the ill preparation in languages, especially in their 
mother tongue, exhibited by many of the candidates for admission to 
the freshman class, it is deemed advisable, for the sake of honest 
work, to devote a portion of the first year to grounding such students 
in the principles of grammar. 

Especial attention is given to the study of the writings, themselves, 
of leading English authors, since direct contact with literature is 
considered more profitable than information merely about literature. 

All students before classed as regular in any course leading to a 
degree must conform to all the requirements in English for admission 
as set forth on page 32. 

For requirements as to thesis and as to proficiency in English for 
certificates and degrees see page 38. 

Declamation and themes (or orationsliire^required of all regular 
students. For details see below. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

Freshman Class.— Five hours a week ; study of grammar, the prin- 
ciples of special and general composition, with frequent brief papers 
illustrating the laws studied; study of American authors: Irving, 
Hawthorne, Holmes, Foe, Bryant, Longfellow. 

Morris's English Grammar, Lockwood's Rhetoric, Kellogg & Reed's 
English Language. 

'Sophomore Class.— Three hours a week; study of style, analysis of 
selections of prose and poetry, frequent essays on historic and liter- 
ary themes. 

Genung's Rhetoric, Genung's Rhetorical Analysis, Syle's FrW 
Milton to Tennyson. 

Junior class.— Three hours a week ; lectures on the history of Eng- 
lish literature, critical study of English classics, essays. 

Pancoast's History of English Literature ; Palgrave's Golden Treas- 
ury ; Macaulay, Carlyle, DeQuincey, etc. 

Senior class.-Two hours a week, first term. Principles of Criti- 
cism, Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, Hamlet, Dowden's .Shakespeare's , 
etc. 

THEMES AND ORATIONS. 

Theory without practice is as fruitless in the study of English as 
.n any other department of study. Practical work is indispensable 
to the successful teaching of English. 

^1?^^"?^ PaperS> illustrati ™ of the subject matter 

rllf ' ? th6meS ° r ° rati0nS are re * uired of all students. - 

Foi the freshman class ten themes a year ; ten for the sophomore ; for 
the senior and j unior classes, three orations each . 



** 









At.arama Polytechnic Institute. 59 

declamation. 

The old practice of committing pieces to memory for "speaking" id 
cultivated as a means, both of training in the art of thinking on the 
feet, and of storing the mind with the diction of finished specimen. 

of English style. 

The sophomore class is heard weekly throughout the year In sec- 
tions of ten, once for an hour and a half in rehearsal, afterwards to 
the study hall before the body of students. 

The senior and junior classes also deliver their orations to pubhc. 

PHILOSOPHY AND POLITICAL ECONOMY. 

The entire senior class pursues the study of intellectual 
science, twice a week, through the year; and political econ- 
omy wice a week, during the last two terms. The , instruc- 
Zl in this department is by lectures in combination with 
text-books. . . 

s ssrs^*-** De<i " o,i ™ ,nd "°'""" 

' , hflS a . s0 been established in English. The 

A Post-graduate Course has a so uee 
following courses have been given : h Merchant of Venice, 

(!) «WNP-5T»5*J? Y Richard III, King John. 
As You Like It, Henry IV. Fart i^ Dromahc Pctfsy 

(2) Dryden-Poetical Works (OWJJ •>. » Saintsbur ys ii/< 

(Thomas Arnold) ; JS«.«|f "» »' ' 

ofDrydm. SaJirM (Pattison); Stephen's !../« of 

'nL-Poemi Tr-erto (Ward), Aoft ^ c Wera(ure . 

I^Qo^.^»^J e to £ ^LS».C«--r,: Addison, Pope, 

5) *«U» ^^oLper Burke. 
Grft y , Goldsmith, Burns C wper ^ poe< 

^4) American Literature . 



v/ 



GO 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



CHEMISTEY. 

PROFESSOR B, B. ROSS. 

ttistruotion in this department embraces— 

1. A course of lectures in general chemistry. 

2. A course of lectures in industrial chemistry, 

3. A course of lectures in agricultural chemistry. 

4. Systematic laboratory work in connection with each 
course of lectures, for the practice of chemical analysis and 

chemical research. 

1. Course in general chemistry : This consists of a 
series of lectures (three per week) extending throughout the 
entire' session, and includes a discussion of the fundamental 
principles of chemical philosophy in connection with the 
history, preparation, properties and compounds of the 
metallic and non-metallic elements, with the main facts and 
principles of organic chemistry. In this course the more 
common applications of chemistry to the arts and manufac- 
tures are discussed. The apparatus used for experimental 
illustration is extensive, containing the newest and most 
approved instruments necessary for presenting the subject 
in the most attractive and instructive form. 






REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Roscoe & Fchorlemmer, Fownes, Frankland, Remsen, Cooke's 
Chemical Philosophy, Chemical Journals. 

2. The lectures on industrial chemistry (three per week) 
extend throughout the session, and include a discussion in 
detail of the processes and chemical principles involved in 
the most important applications of chemistry in the arts and 
manufactures to the reduction of ores, the preparation of 
materials for food and drink, for clothing, shelter, illumina- 
tion, cleansing, purifying, writing, printing, etc. 

These lectures are amply, illustrated by means of suitable 
specimens of raw materials and manufactured products, 
together with models and diagrams. 



wmmmmmmmmm 



■ "» r—^^mmmmm 



••mm 



MM 



lliliiiili 



an 





CHEMICAL LABORATORY (Interior), 






V 



<v 



1 
- 



) 



,:> 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 



61 



Waener-s Chemical Technology, Muspratf s Chemistry as apnhed 
to Arts and Manufacturing, lire's Dictionary, Watt's Dtc«onw,, 
LhV&m and Watt's Chemical Technology, Percy's Metallurgy, 
Sadtler's Industrial Organic Chemistry. 

^ 3 Course in agricultural chemistry : This consists , of . 
lectures on chemistry in its applications to agriculture (two 
,er w et) and includes a thorough discussion of the origin 
rmposit on and classification of soils, the composition and 
composition _ ources f plant food and how ob- 

gro wth of plants the urces ^ ^^ ^ ^ 

SfcdfiTCSS-l principles involved in the rota- 
of fertilizers, tne ^ ^ ^ 

!££*& - ^ «" "'^ - " w 

agriculturist. * 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

,„„„»», B.. c 7 > s -"-ass: ssls; 

4. The coow o. *«*££*,, laid X 
MM ,o ol practical work ,. the «^'° ? brMe8 the 

conoeetion with e.oh eoum ol b*n* ^ ^ 

poetical operation, ol . *» cj «*- ^ ^ „, the 

ing varied somewhat to suit 

Student. fro m9AM.to5r.M.,duringsix 

The laboratories, which are Jjjjj every thing **"«£. 
davs in the week, are amply bUPP ji* ua iitative and quant 

Suction in chemical ^ff^SU ~*»Ufc 

2C SS ^^^53* -re- 
prosecuting chemical researche- J^ ^ ^ ^, Btudy of prac 

students who wish to devote the. ^ ^ 

tical chemistry. chemic al laborato y i ^ 

Each student on entei ""(5 bottles , and t e J 

with a work table, a set o * *, rt a „d quant.tauve J 
agents and apparatus used m quai 



62 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



o 



At the close of the session he will be credited with such articles as 
may be returned in good order; the value of those which have been 
injured or destroyed will be deducted from his contingent fee. 

In addition to the analytical work above described, it is designed 
to give during the session a short course in electro-plating. Practical 
instruction in the electro-deposition of nickel, silver, geid, etc., upon 
other metals will be given, and, in addition, the application of elec- 
trolysis to chemical analysis will be studied both theoretically and 
practically. 

Books Used. 

In qualitative analysis—Jones, Fresenius, Plattner. 

In quantitative analysis— Fresenius, Sutton, Rose, Bunsen, Rick- 
ett's Notes on Assaying, Mitchell's Manual of Practical Assaying. 

In agricultural chemical analysis -Official methods of the Associa- 
tion of Agricultural Chemists, Wiley's Principles and Practice of 
Agricultural Analysis. ^ 

CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 
[For description of the building see page 14.] 

The chemical apparatus recently purchased for the laboratory con- 
sists of a full supply of the most approved instruments for practical 
work and investigation. The building is supplied with water and gas 
and every appliance required to meet the demands of modern scien- 
tific instruction and research. In addition to the apparatus usually 
supplied to first-class laboratories, there have been imported a new 
and improved Schmidt and Hensch's polariscope, four short-arm 
Becker balances of latest pattern, Bunsen spectroscope, Zeiss micros- 
cope, and other instruments for delicate and accurate work 



HISTOKY AND LATIN. 

PROFESSOR PETRIE. 
HISTORY. 

In this department the aim is not so much to memorize 
facts as to understand them. Strong emphasis is laid on 
the fact that history is not a succession of isolated facts but 
a progressive whole, each event being at once the cause and 
the effect of other events. The students are taught to in- 
vestigate the growth of ideas and institutions, the rise and 
progress of great historical movements and the reciprocal 
influences of men and circumstances. Frequent use is made 



jj 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



63 



of diagrams, photographs, charts and maps, with which the 
department is well equipped. Constant practice in map 
drawing is insisted on in order to give precision to the geo- 
graphical knowledge required. Instruction is given by text- 
books, lectures and class discussion, but a constant effort is 
made to stimulate to wider reading and research in the 

library. .-. - 

In the freshman class, the subjects studied are the United 
States, Alabama, and England. The first term (two hours 
per week) is devoted to the history and government of the 
United States, the second term (two hours per week) to 
Alabama, and the third term (threfc hours per week) to the 

history of England. 

In the sophomore class (three hours per week until March) 
the subject studied is general European history. 

In the junior and senior classes opportunity for special historical 

gate in the library under the direction o* tta piofeij P 
Lcted with the lectures, and wiH repor t the clas ^ e. 
research. These reports w, 11 be made thba-o 

A series of lectures will be given from tune tc . w 
foreign events, and on important points in recent hi.tory. 

Text-Books. — *. 

W.M11 & Lemmon's History of the United 
Freshman class.-Cooper, Est 11 4. Lem , the Unite d States 

States, Thorpe & McCorvey's Civil Gove indent 
and Alabama, Montgomery s English H»tory_ 
Sophomore class.-Myers's ^ ^JJ. <* the Union, Wood- 
Junior and Senior classes.-Hait *o o{ E land . 
row Wilson's Division and Reunion. Oman 

LATIN. 
The objects kept in view in this depart ac- 
curate knowledge of the ^^^'tbeir English 
with Latin words, their etymology _^ ^ ^ in _ 
derivatives ; an appreciation 0I , and civilizat ion b 
telligent conception «***££ on t £ 6 mo dern world, 
themselves and in their etteci, o 



in- 
both 



I 






I 



in 







64 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



A systematic course of instruction is given in the forms and 
syntax. These are taught bgth deductively from a grammar and 
inductively from the text r^ad Translation is constantly practiced, 
sometimes at sight, sometimes after being assigned for preparation. 
English passages based on a familiar author or illustrative of special 
construction's are put into Latin both orally and in writing. Great 
emphasis is laid on the etymology of the words in the text read. 

In connection with every author studied in class a course of read- 
ing in English is prescribed descriptive of his life, work and times. 
The historical setting and the artistic value of his writings is care- 
fully discussed and frequent comparisons are made with modern 
authors. 

For' the benefit of students who do not study the Latin language a 
series of popular lectures will be given upon the great Latin writers. 

Text- Books. 

Freshman Class— Grammar, Exercises, Nepos, Sallust. 

Sophomore Class.— Cicero, Selections from Livy, Allen & Green- 
ough's Grammar, Exercises. 

Junior Class.— Virgil, Horace, A. & G.'s Grammar, Exercises, Al- 
len's History of Rome, Wilkins's Roman Antiquities. 

Senior Class-Selections from Latin Authors, Wilkins's Latin Lit- 
erature, Ancient Classics for English Readers, Exercises. 



MODERN LANGUAGES. 

PROFESSOR C. H. ROSS. 

The following regular courses are given in French and 
German : 

French— First Year .- Three recitations a week. During 
this year the principal object is to acquire a knowledge of 
the elements of grammar and a. correct pronunciation, 
together with facility in translating ordinary French. Read- 
ing is bdgan at an early stage, and the principles of gram- 
mar are illustrated and impressed by frequent exercises in 
rendering English into French. 

Second Year: Three recitations a week. During this 
year, almost the same line of work is pursued as that begun 
in the previous year. More difficult and varied French is 
read, and instruction is given upon the laws of grammar 



, 






■ . .„■'■....-■:- 








I 



ELECTRICAL BUILDING. 




J 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 65 

the construction of the language, and the history of the 
literature. Special attention is given to sight translation. 

German— Tioo Years : Three recitations a week the first 
year, three a week the second year. In this course the aim 
and the methods are similar to those in French. 

A post-graduate course in French has been offered, con- 
sisting of a study of the life and works of Victor Hugo and 
Alexandre Dumas, Sr. 

Text-Books. 

French — First Year: Keetels' Elementary French Grammar; 
French Fairy Tales, Jules Verne's Michel StrogofT. 
, Second Year : Hugo's Hernani, MerimeVsColomba; French Prose 
Composition. 

Post-graduate Course: Les Miserables, Les/Irois Mousquetaires ; 
various books and articles on Hugo and Dumas. * 

German — First Year: Harris's German Lessons; Super's Ele- 
mentary German Reader, Zschokke's Der Zerbrochene Krug. 

Second Year: Goold's Tales from Hauff,. Goethe's Hermann und 
Dorothea ; Harris's German Composition. 



ELECTEICAL ENGINEERING. 

PROFESSOR McKISSICK. 

The students in this course will study English, French. or German, 
physics, mathematics, etc., as now prescribed for the course of civil 
engineering in the junior and senior years ; and, in addition thereto, 
will prosecute their studies in electricity and mechanics, as herein 

prescribed. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Four hours a week for the entire session are devoted to 
the studies of the principles of electricity and ma^tism. 
The student is made familiar with the theoretical r5rinci>les 
by experiments, illustrations, recitations, and lectures. 

Laboratory Work.-Foui- hours per week are given to 
work in the laboratory. This includes management of 
batteries, construction of instruments, electro-plating, elec- 
trical measurements, verification of the principles upon 
whih the measurements of current, electromotive force and 

resistance are based, etc. 
5 



^ 



or. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



I 






3 






Tkxt-Books. 

Avrton's Practical Electricity, Stewart and Gee's Practical 
Physics, Niehol'i Laboratory Manual, Vol. I. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

In the senior year five hours per week are devoted to 
theoretical instruction in electricity and magnetism, sup- 
plemented by a course of lectures and practical demonstra- 
tions on the applications of electricity to lighting, electric 
railways, electrical transmission of energy, polyphase cur- 
rents, electrical welding, etc. 

Encouragement is offered to advanced students for conducting 
original investigations, and opportunity is taken to stimulate a spirit 
of scientific inquiry. Courses of reading are suggested to such stu- 
dents in connection with their experimental work. 

Laboratory Work. — Six hours per week are devoted to 
practical laboratory work, electrical measurements, relation 
of electrical currents to heat and mechanical work, care and 
tests of dynamo and motors, calibration of voltmeters, am- 
meters and watt-meters, electric lighting, management and 
care of accumulators, energy consumed*rn lamps, adjustment 
and care of arc lamps, proper wiring of buildings, the ap- 
plication of electricity to street railways, magnetic meas- 
urements, tests of transformers and alternating motors, etc. 

Drawing and Construction.— Two hours per week in the 
senior year are devoted to the design and construction of 
electrical machinery. The student is required to make 
original designs of dynamos, motors, transformers, etc. 

Text-Books. 

Thompson's Dynamo Electric Machinery, American Street Kail- 
ways by Hedges, NiehoPs Laboratory Manual, Vol. II. 

Post-graduate Course. *■ 

This includes advanced study and laboratory work in alternating 
currents. 

Reference Books. 

The Dynamo by Hawkins & Wallace, Alternating Currents by Jack- 
son, Principles of the Transformer by Bedell, Dynamos, Alternators 
and Transformers by Kapp, Alternating Current Phenomena by 
Steinmetz. 




Alabama Polytechnic Instetote. 



fi7 




H 












68 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



equipment. 

The electrical laboratory has a complete line of batteries, call- 
bells, annunciators, telegraph sounders, relays, keys, magnets, gal- 
vanometers, resistance boxes, electro-plating apparatus, and all ap- 
paratus for students in electrical engineering. The equipment 
comprises many fine instruments of precision: Sir Wm. Thom- 
son's standard 100 ampere balance (either for direct or alternating 
currents); Sir Wm. Thomson's graded current galvanometer, read- 
ing 600 amperes; also, his graded potential galvanometer, reading 
600 volts; Weston alternating current voltmeter, Weston direct 
reading watt-meter, Queen's "Acme" testing set, Kelvin electro- 
static voltmeter, Cardew voltmeter (for direct or alternating cur- 
rents), reading to 150 volts ; Weston's standard ammeter and volt- 
meter, box of resistance coils; Queen's magnetic vane voltmeter, 
and ammeter, standard micro-farad condenser and Sabine key; 
Thompson watt-meter, ballistic reflecting galvanometer, mirror gal- 
vanometer, Fein ammeter and voltmeter, Ayrton & Perry ammeter, 
Edison ammeters, Kohl's solenoid ammeter, Wood ammeter, Deprez 
ammeter, Hartman & Braun voltmeter, D'Arsonval galvanometer, 
Rowland-D'Arsonval galvanometer, Hughe's induction balance, tasi- 
meter, microphone, telephones, electrolytic apparatus and several 
mirror and other galvanometers for first year students. 

In the dynamo room the following are installed: One Weston 150 
volt, 20 ampere dynamo, with rheostat ; one Brush 6 arc light dynamo, 
with regulator and six lamps; one Ideal 5 kilo-watt three phase 
alternator; one Thomson-Houston 9 arc light dynamo with lamps; 
one Edison compound wound 12 kilo-watt generator; a Thomson- 
Houston 110 volt, 75 ampere generator; two street car motors used 
as either direct or alternating current generators or motors; two 
polyphase induction motors ; one General Electric 5 horse-power in- 
duction motor; General Electric 20 horse-power motor; one Stanley 
induction motor with condensers ; Edison 3^ kilo-watt generator ; a 
Crocker-Wheeler one horse-power motor and rheostat, and one 
bi-phase alternator, and 500 volt generator, made by special students 
furnish current to laboratory, and light up the different buildings' 
A lamp board with a capacity of 210 lamps has been installed and is 
used for testing purposes. 

The dynamos occupy a separate brick building, 50 x 32 feet and 
are operated by a 35 horse-power Westinghouse vertical engine' and 
a 25 horse-power Atlas engine. 

This department, being provided with Sir Wm. Thomson's standard 
electrical instruments for exact measurements, will calibrate free of 
expense, any ammeter or voltmeter that may be sent to the College 

An e ectnc motor made by students, supplied with current fronla 
generator at a distance of 3,000 feet, operates a gin, gin press, ensi- 



> 



V- 




/ 




WOOD ROOM. 



MB 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 69 

lage cutter and feed cutter at the experiment station farm. This 
motor not only subserves a useful purpose in the operation of these 
machines, but is an excellent illustration of the electric transmission 
of power. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND MECHANIC 

ARTS. 



PKOFESSOR WILMOHE. 



B. H. CRENSHAW, 
R. J. TRAMMELL, 



MECHANIC ARTS. 

The course in manual training covers three years, as fol- 
lows : first year, wood-working — carpentry and turning; 
second year, pattern-making and foundry and forge work- 
molding, casting and smithing; third year, machine shop- 
chipping and filing and machiue work in metals. 

This course is obligatory upon the students of the three 
lower classes. For satisfactory reasons a student may be 
excused from this laboratory work by the Faculty. 

The full work of each class is six hours per week, in three 
exercises of two hours each. 

The power for running the apparatus in this department is derived 
from a twenty-five horse-power Harris-Corliss automatic engine 
which is supplied with steam by a thirty horse-power steel horizontal 
tubular boiler. A st-am pump and a heater for the feed water form 
apart of the steam apparatus. For the steam plant a substantial 
brick boiler-house and chimney have been erected. 

The equipment for the wood-working shop comprises the following : 
30 wood-working benches, each with complete set of carpenter s too s ; 
24 tiirning-lathes, 10-inch swing, each with complete set of tools ; 
1 double circular saw ; 1 band saw ; 1 board-planing machine ; 1 buz, 
planer; 1 large pattern-make* lathe, 16-inch swing; 3 -inch 
grindstone. The tool room is supplied with a variety of extra and- 
toolsfor special work, and in addition ^^v»f^W^ 
tools in-lfie benches, each student is supplied ^^Jf*£* 
and plane irons with a locker to keep them m and is held responsible 
for their care and condition. h*n*hAi for 

The equipment for the foundry coiwuts oJ molding benches for 






70 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



I t 



18 students, each supplied with a complete set of molder's tools; a 
28-inch Colliau cupola, with all modern improvements, capable of 
melting 2,(»0O pounds of iron per hour; a brass furnace in which can 
be melted 100 pounds of brass at a heat, with a set of crucible tongs, 
etc. Also a full supply of ladles, large and small molding flasks, a 
foundry crane, special tools, etc. 

The forge shop equipment consists of 16 hand forges of new pattern, 
each with a set of smith's tools, anvil, etc. The blast, for all the 
forges is supplied by a No. 3 Sturtevant steel pressure blower (which 
also furnishes blast for the foundry cupola), and a No. 15 Sturtevant 
exhaust blower draws the smoke from trie fires into the smoke-flues 
and forces it out through the chimney. 

The machine department occupies a brick building, 30 x 50 feet, and 
is equipped with six engine-lathes (screw-cutting), 14-inch swing, 
6-foot bed ; 2 engine-lathes, 18-inch swing, (one with taper attach- 
ment) ; 1 engine-lathe, 18-inch swing, with compound res,t and taper 
attachment; 1 screw-cutting lathe, 12-inch swing; 1 speed lathe, 10- 
inch swing; I 20-inch drill press (power feed); 110-inch sensitive 
drill ; 1 15-inch shaper ; 1 22-inch x 22 inch x 5 feet planer; 1 univer- 
sal milling machine; 1 corundum tool grinder (14-inch wheel); 1 
bench grinder; 1 post xirill press, 14-inch; 1 universal cutter and 
reamer grinder; 1 Brown & Sharpe universal grinding machine; 1 
power hack saw. A part of the room is set apart for vise-work, 
chipping and filing; and benches for 12 students are provided, each 
with vise and set of files, chisels, hammers, etc. In the tool-room is 
to be found a good supply of machinists' tools for general shop use, 
such as lathe and drill chucks, drills, reamers, taps, dies, gauges, 
hies cutting and measuring tools, and special appliances for machine 
work, with machine for grinding twist drills. 

The nature of the work in each department is as follows : 

First Year. 

I. A course of carpentry or hand work covering the first two terms 
The lefsons include instruction in the nature and use of tools in- 
struction and practice in shop drawing, elementary work with plane 
saw chisel different kinds of joints, timber-splices, cross joints' 
mortise and tenon mitre^and frame work, dovetail work, comprising 
different kinds of joints used in cabinet making, light cabinetwork, 
examples in building, framing, roof-trusses, etc. 

II. A course in turning, extending through the third term. The 
lessons comprise, first, nature and use of lathe and tools plain 
straight turning caliper work to different diameters and leng hs 
simple and compound curves, screw plate and chuck work, hollow 
and spherical turning. * » uonow 



) 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

Second Year. 



71 



I. A course in forge work in iron and steel, occupying the first 
term. The lessons are arranged so that the students, in making the 
series of objects, become familiar with the nature of the metals and 
the successive steps in working them by hand into simple and com- 
plex forms, as drawing, upsetting, bending, cutting, punching, weld- 
ing by various methods, tool-forging, tempering, hardening, etc. 

II. A course in pattern-making covering the second term. The 
work includes a variety of examples of whole and split patterns, core 
work, etc., giving the students familiarity with the use of patterns 
for general molding. 

III. A course in molding and casting in iron and brass occupy- 
ing the third term. The work consists for the most part of small 
articles, such as light machine parts, but a sufficient variety of forms 
are introduced for the student to acquire a good general and practi- 
cal knowledge of the usual methods and appliances used in light 
foundry work. Most of the work is in graen sand in two part flasks; 
core work is also given, and some three part flask and some dry sand 
work is introduced. 

The same patterns which have been previously made by students 
are used, besides special patterns for occasional larger or more 
complicated work. Instruction and practice is given in working the 
cupola, each, student in turn taking charge of a melting. 

In connection with this second year work, a series of lectures is 
given on the metallurgy and working of the metals used in the indus- 
trial arts, cast and wrought iron, steel, brass, etc. 

Third Year. 

L A course of chipping and filing, covering the first term. The 
lessons comprise work on cast and wrought iron ; chipping to line on 
fiat and curved surfaces, key-seating, etc. ; filing and finishing to line 
'straight and curved), surface filing and finishing, fitting, slotting, 
dovetail work, sawing, pin and screw filing, surface finishing with 

scraper, etc. T , 

II. Machine work occupying the remainder of the year, ine 
work includes cast and wrought iron, .steel and brass; turning to 
various diameters and lengths, taper turning, facing with chuck and 
face plate, drilling-both in lathe and drill press -reaming, boring, 
screw-cutting in lathe and with taps and dies, planing ^g.etc,, 
with planer and shaper, milling various ^™*^^X5. 
chine, including exercises in making taps, reamers, etc.,fitting, gnna- 

"tS^So given during the year on ^^^ 
neoted with machine work in metals : such as forms, conation and 
use of the various machines, cutting tools, gearing, gauges, screw 



72 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



threads, etc. During the last term some piece of construction work 
is given the classes. 

All of the work is done from blue prints made by the class in draw- 
ing. In the construction work, the student is given a blue print and 
the material for a certain part. He is then encouraged to study the 
work and plan the best method of doing it. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 
JUNIOR YEAR. 

Elementary Mechanics. — Three hours a week for the first 
term are devoted to this subject. The fundamental laws 
underlying all mechanical science and the mechanics of 
liquids, gases and vapors are studied. 

Principles of Mechanism. — Three recitations per week 
during the second and third terms are devoted to this 
subject. 

Under this head machines are analyzed and their elementary com- 
binations of mechanism studied. The communication of motion by 
gear wheels, belts, cams, screws and link-work, the different ways of 
obtaining definite velocity ratios and definite changes of velocity, 
parallel motions and quick return motions as well as the designing 
of trains of mechanism for various purposes, together with the theo- 
retical forms of teeth for gear wheels to transmit the motion through 
these trains, are investigated under this subject. 

Mechanical Drawing —Daring the first term the students make 
drawing to exact scale, of some of the simpler machines. The stu- 
dent takes his own measurements and makes his own sketches from 
which to make the finished drawing. 

An elementary course of machine design is started at the beginning 
of the second term and continued till the end of the year. Some 
comparatively simple machine is selected and studied in all its de- 
tails. Careful attention is given to the strength of the parts and their 
mechanical arrangement with reference to facility of manufacture 
An actual machine or the working drawings of a machine are ob- 
tained, the dimensions compared with those obtained by applying 
the theoretical formulas, and the causes of variation between the 
two studied. 

Laboratory Work.-The laboratory work will consist of hand work 
in iron and machine work in iron, as given in the course in mechanic 
arts in the third year. 

Text-Books. 

WocxTb Elementary Mechanics ; Stahl and Wood's Elementary 
Mechanism. J 




i 



f 



4! 



r 




u 




w 



fcti; 

p. 






*? 



* &Jrc 






^*H:^5iiH>»N<-. /*** 



«££J 
8«*« 



fl 





© 
o 

2 



© 



r^l » 



rm » 



nr II II II 

o! n n n r 

i JU 111 







N- 



■ 



s 



****- 



jr 



A latum a POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE. 



73 



SENIOR YEAR. 

Mechanical Engineering of Power Plants. -The first term 
five hours per week is given to the study of the practical 
applications of steam machinery. It is believed that a 
thorough knowledge of the apparatus in actual practical use 
is the best preparation a student can have for the study of 
the theory, and to that end, the different types of engines, 
boilers, pumps, condensers, and other auxiliary apparatus 
are taken up and studied in detail, and the advantages and 
disadvantages of each discussed. Extensive files of manu- 
facturer's catalogues are kept and the technical papers and 
magazines in the library are freely used in order to keep in 
touch with the latest and best practice in engineering work. 

Steam Engine.— -The second term five hours per week will 
be given to the study of the theory and efficiency of the steam 
engine, with discussions of the effects of condensation in 
cylinder, action of fly-wheels, effects of jacketing, etc. Sim- 
ple and compound engines, various valves and cut-off 
motions, and the principal types of modern engines are 
studied. Special attention is given to the steam engine 
indicator. 

Graphical Statics of Mechanism. -Six weeks of the third term, five 
hours per week, will be given to the study of this subject. The ad- 
vantage of graphical over analytical methods is generally recognized, 
and new applications of the former are constantly being made. By 
its use the forces acting in every part of a machine may be deter- 
mined,' both in direction and intensity, without the use of a mathe- 
matical formula. . ... - 

During the remainder of the third term, a series of lectures on 
mechanical refrigeration and gas engines is given. 

Machine Design.— The subject of machine design is made 
a continuation of the junior course and runs throughout 
the year, two hours a week. During the first term, the 
strength and proportions of different joints and fastenings 
are studied, and problems given for actual solution. During 
the remainder of the year the time is spent on steam engine 
design. The results as obtained from standard formulas 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

are coin pared with the dimensions as used by the best con- 
structors, and the reasons for variations, if any occur, are 
studied. 

Laboratory Work.— The students are not only taoght how to cali- 
brate and use the different instruments, but they are brought in 
~oo*K*et with engineering appliances under practical working con- 
ditio** 

Thoroughness of work is sought rather than the performance of a 
large number of experiments. 

The following course has been arranged: 

Calibration of steam gauge; calibration of indicator spring; cali- 
bration of thermometer; calibration of scales and balances: calori- 
meter tests with barrel separating and throttling calorimeters : boiler 
t#*t with determination of the quality of steam and analysis of flue 
gas ; efficiency test of engine with brake and indicator power 
urement ; test of hot air pumping engine ; efficiency and duty of 

£**«*?; tenaional. congressional and transverse tests of cast . 

«roa*ht iron, steel and wood, in which are observed the limit of 
elasticity, t^e ultimate breaking strength and the modulus of 
elasticity 

Ml cla>> * illy makes a test of some electric plant or mill 
tii»e i» the last term 

Tie afjpfttttf for carrying on this work consists of id - 

Imperial cross compound engine, especially arranged for 
*****! wor*. supplied with Wheeler surface condenser 
a£r|*m**ft4 circulating pump, of a 25 horse-power . 
t*t£n<K a $& horse-power Westirighouse engine, a 25 
Auas e<*£ti*e. t*o$ horse-power engines constructed bj 
*** sfcofs* a small engine ami boiler especially for _ 
***4Sv a £*tfex IVaite steam pump, an Kricssoo hoc air 
Ws**i***vM*s* air |H*mp. four steam engine indicators, a a 

k *«or\ pyrometer*. >cales, a standard steam gauge w^ a?c»- 
* teetia* steam gauges, a Crosby dead weight 
tW standard gau$e, a ^XX^pound testing 
»» » »*** •MCtome^r esreaaometer. a Carpenter cal^„ 
W^Kf «|f^l^ *vr determine the heating value of 

,*a*«*i ■■ # **?$ *$ of IVw*r C Hant^ Hote*^ 
^f!?"*^**** *****! Sialic* of Mec***fe» ; Cm*** 



rc»f r 



■ 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 75 

*'■■■■'■ _ 

Reference Books. 

The library contains a number of standard works on the various 
subjects studied, and the students are referred to them constantly 
for more extended treatment of many points that come up in class. 

POST-GRADUATE COUESE. 

The following course has been arranged and represents the amount 
of work required. Hydraulics may be substituted for thermody- 
namics if the members of the class are unanimous in wishing the 
change Other substitutions may be made at the option of the pro- 
fessor, provided they represent an equivalent amount of work, and 
are in the general line of the course selected. 

Dynamometers -This includes dynamometers and the measurement 
of power Absorption and transmission dynamometers are studied, 
with their application and use in testing steam engines. < 

Valve Gears.-The different forms of valve gears of steam engines 
are studied, and problems in designing gears are worked out. 
TiSS^to of the Steam Engine.-TMs subject is studied 
theoretically, and practically, and attempts a complete analysis of the 
action of steam in an engine. 

Laboratory Work.-As much advanced laboratory work will be 
given as can be arranged with the appliances at hand. 

Text-Books. 

Father's Dynamometers and Measurement of Power, Spangler's 
Valve Gears, Peabody's Thermodynamics of the Steam Engine, 
Merriman's Hydraulics. 

AGEICULTUEE. 

PROFESSOR DUGGAR. 

Instruction in agriculture is given by means of lectures, 
text-books,bulletinsof the agricultural experimental stations, 
and practical work in field, barn, and dairy. 

The study of agriculture begins with the freshman class in 
the third term, and extends through throe terms of the sopho- 
more year and two terms of the junior year. The time 
devoted to this study in the lecture room is two hours per 

week with each class. 

The subjects studied by the freshman class are the breeds 
of horses, cattle, sheep, and hogs,— their characteristics, 




76 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



uses, management and adaptability to the South. Practical 
work in judging live-stock is included in the course. 

The first term of the sophomore year is devoted to dairy- 
ing and to a study of the principles of live-stock breeding. 
Dairying will be taught by practical work in the dairy,— r 
butter making, determination of fat in milk by the Babcock 
method, etc.,— as well as by instruction in the lecture 

room. 

In the second term of the sophomore year the following 
subjects are studied: soils— chemical and physical prop- 
erties, defects, and means of improvement ; the control of 
water, including means of conserving moisture in times of 
drought, terracing, underdrainage, and open and hillside 
ditches ; objects and methods of cultivation ; agricultural 
implements ; rotation of crops ; and improvement of plants 
by crossing, selection, and culture. 

The third term of the sophomore year is devoted to the 
staple crops produced in Alabama, to forage plants adapted 
to the South, and to plants valuable for the renovation of 
soils. The more important crops are treated with reference 
to varieties, soil and fertilizer requirements, methods of 
planting and cultivating, and uses. 

In the junior year the subjects of feeding animals and of 
farm management are studied. Among the topics included 
under the latter heading are different systems of farming 
and stock growing, farm equipment and buildings, silos and 
silage, care of farm manures, composting, choice and meth- 
ods of applying commercial fertilizers for different crops 
and soils, and economical methods of improving exhausted 
soils. 

In every class the student is encouraged to independent thought 
on agricultural problems rather than to depend on "rules of thumb," 
so that he may be prepared to adapt his practice in after years to 
changed conditions of soil, climate, capital, market, etc." The suc- 
cessful farmer must be a thinker rather than a blind follower of in- 
flexible rules. 

The effort is made to keep before the student the difference be- 
tween the widely applicable principles on which every rational ays- 



v- 



y 



-^ 














LABORATORY OF BIOLOGY. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



77 



tern of farming rests and the details that vary with changing condi- 
tions. The conditions of soil, climate, etc., prevailing in different 
parts of Alabama are kept constantly in view. 

As far as limited time allows, attention is directed to agricultural 
literature now accumulaiing so rapidly in this and in foreign coun- 
tries, to the end that in future years the student may know where 
and how to seek the information that he may need. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Horses, Cattle, Sheep, and Swine, by Curtis; Milk and its Pro- 
ducts, by Wing; Dairyman's Manual, by Stewart; Soils and Crops of 
the Farm, by Morrow & Hunt ; Muir's Agriculture ; Corn Culture, by 
Plumb ; The Soil, by King ; Manures and the Principles of Manuring, 
by Aikman ; Drainage for Profit and Health, by Waring; Agriculture 
in some of its Relations with Chemistry, by Storer ; Manual of Cat- 
tle Feeding, by Armsby ; Stock Breeding, by Miles; Hand-Book of 
Experiment Station Work ; and selected publications of the various 
divisions of the U. S. Department of Agriculture and of the agricul- 
tural experiment stations. 

Applicants for post-graduate work in agriculture will be assigned 
special research work and aided in the line of investigation deemed 
best for each individual student. 









BIOLOGY AND HORTICULTUEE. 

PROFESSOR EARLE. 

The subject of biology is required of the senior class in 
the courses of chemistry and agriculture, and of phar- 
macy. It occupies five hours a week for three terms of 
the senior year. The work in this department will be 
largely confined to the study of the lower forms of plant 
life and to vegetable physiology, or the study of plants as 
living beings. Under the first head special attention will 
be given to the bacteria and other disease producing 
organisms of man and the higher animals ; and to the par- 
asitic fungi that cause diseases of plants. Under vegetable 
physiology those problems that explain the foundation for 
correct agriculture practices will be made most prominent. 
This will include the germination of seeds, the food and 




80 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



without first placing all the circumstances of the case before his pa- 
rent or guardian, s. 

Candidates for appointment or promotion may be required to stand 
an examination. Moral fitness, including demerits, will be consid- 
sidered . 

Examinations will be conducted by a Board of Officers, to be com- 
posed of the Commandant of Cadets and two commissioned officers, 
to be designated by him. The proceedings of the Board are subject 
to revision and approval by the President of the College. 

Each company is officered by One captain, two first lieutenants, one 

second lieutenant, and with a proper number of non-commissioned 

officers. The officers and non-commissioned officers are distinguished 

by appropriate insignia of rank. These appointments are confirmed 

by the President on nomination of the Commandant. 

The junior class recites once a week in the United States Ii fantrv 
Tactics. J 

The senior class recites once a week in " Notes on Military Science." 
On the graduation of each clasc the names of such students as have 
shown sperial aptitude for military service will be reported to the 
Adjutant-General of the U. S. Army, and the names of the three 
most distinguished in military science and tactics will be inserted in 
the U. S. Army Register, and published in general orders from head- 
quarters of the army. 



PHYSIOLOGY AND VETERINARY SCIENCE. 

PROFESSOR CARY. 
PHYSIOLOGY. 

The sophomore class studies human anatomy, physiology 
and hygiene during the entire college year 

r>rt£! he ? m ?l the , ? e P artment t0 give the students 
practical and real knowledge of the gross anatomy and func- 
tions of the various parts of the human body. Due atten- 
tion 18 given also, to the laws of health-the conditions 

oTtttranC; C ° DtiUUOn8 h6althy aCti ° n ° f the «*~ 
Instruction is given by lectures and by text-books sud- 
plemented by black-board drawings, charts models of 
organs, a human skelelon, and by dissections o some of the 
smaller animals (dog, cat, etc.). - 




^ 



/ 




J 




CO 

H 
id 
Q 
< 
O 



CO 

Q. 
DC 

o 
o 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



r 



81 



Martin's Human Body is used as a text and reference 
book, and several other works on anatomy, physiology and 
hygiene may be consulted in the college and experiment 
station libraries. 

VETERINARY SCIENCE AND ART. 

Students in the agricultural and chemical course of study, 
during the entire junior and senior years, devote to this 
work two hours per week in the class room and three hours 
per week at practical clinics. Instruction in veterinary 
science and art is given by lectures. 

The lectures are arranged with special reference to the 
students who are interested in horses or other domestic 
animals ; also to those students who contemplate studying 
human or veterinary medicine. While it is not the aim to 
give a complete course in veterinary medicine, we attempt 
to present the general principles of comparative medicine 
with such special applications as are adapted to the condi- 
tions and wants of the students. 



Rati r\§. 



ButLDING 




6 




82 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



Special attention is given to the exterior anatomy of the horse 
while comparative anatomy is presented mainly in connection with 
the study of the diseases of the different apparatus of the horse or 
other domestic animals. 

Lameness in the horse, minor surgery, the actions and uses of the 
most common medicines, the principles and practice of comparative 
medicine, and the ways of protecting the health of domestic animals 
are considered in as plain and practical a manner as the time allotted 
to each subject will permit. Post mortem examinations and the 
dissection of domestic animals are used as object lessons in the study 
of general pathology and anatomy. 

The senior class in pharmacy devotes three hours per week, during 
the first term, to the study of bacteriology in the class room and 
laboratory ; and three hours per week to the study of therapeutics 
during the second and third terms. 

To the post-graduate student this department furnishes 
work in histology, bacteriology, pathology, meat and milk 
inspection. 

tJttMf tmen K 0f 1 ^ hySi0 u 1 ° gyand veterin «y science is now loca- 
ted by i self n a bmld.ng which consists of a two-story portion, con- 
tain.ng four laboratory rooms on the second floor and a lecture oom 
museum and office on the lower floor; and a one-story part 3 
contains an operating room. " ™ ' 

The building is supplied with water and gas, and the laboratorv i« 

hTseTheT/lrelhet SJfT" ^&-l2E!?S: 

norse, the ox, the sheep, and the hog, and a human skeleton It also 

tb. upper floor i. „„„ ., . "tori" ^.TloTC ?£° """ *°" ' 

« u, iJL pro S t t S£%££»~~ »" '«»•»»<• 





LABORATORY OF PHARMACY, 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 83 

PHARMACY AND PHARMACOGNOSY. 

PROFESSOR MILLER. 
JUNIOR YEAR. - 

Pharmacy.— Class work, three hours a week. The different 
systems of weights and measures. Specific gravity. Phar- 
maceutical problems. The fundamental operations in phar- 
macy. Apparatus used in pharmaceutical processes. Dis- 
cussion of all classes of pharmaceutical preparations. 

Laboratory, nine hours a week. Preparation of official 
and non-official galenicals. 

Pharmacognosy .—Class work with laboratory work, four 
hours a week. All official vegetable drugs studied with aid 
of simple and compound microscope. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Pharmacy. — Class work, four hours a week. Official and 
non-official pharmaceutical chemicals, inorganic and organic, 
including the more important newer remedies. The pre- 
scription. Incompatibilities. Doses. 

Laboratory, nine hours a week. Preparation of official 
and non-official pharmaceutical chemicals, inorganic and or- 
ganic. Pharmaceutical testing by pharmacopoeial methods. 
Drug assaying, special attention given to compounding of 
prescriptions. 

Pharmacognosy. — Class work with laboratory work, four 
hours a week. Study of important non-official vegetable 
drugs; of drugs of animal origin; of adulterants and worth- 
less drugs. Practical exercises in identification of pharma- 
ceutical preparations and chemicals. 

The practical work in pharmacy includes the manufacture of not 
less than two hundred pharmaceutical preparations and the com- 
pounding of not less than than fifty prescriptions. 

The work in pharmacognosy includes the study of more than three 
hundred drugs, each of which the student is required to recognize by 
its physical and chemical properties, giving Latin name, common 
name, origin, habitat, constituents, medicinal action and dose. 






84 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

ZOOLOGY. 

PBOFESSOR BAKER. 

This department is prepared to offer instruction in the 
more important subjects relating to animal life. For the 
present especial attention will be paid to entomology, dis- 
cussing useful and injurious insects in their relations to* 
agriculture. 

Instruction is offered under four heads : 

(1) General Morphology, (2) Embryology, (3) Taxonomy, 
and (4) Interrelations of Plants and Animals. 

The entire course for a post-graduate degree will cover the work 
of the four full terms. At present, in the course of agriculture, a 
portion, amounting to one term's work, is required for a degree. 

(1) General Morphology. Under this head is included a study of 
the anatomy and physiology of types of each of the great groups of 
animals. The guides in this work, which is all done at the laboratory 
table, will be Huxley's Crayfish, Huxley and Martin's Practical 
Biology, and Parker's Zootomy. 

(2) Embryology. For work in embryology the department is well 
equipped, possessing incubators, microtome, the best microscopes, 
and all necessary re-agents. Students taking embryology will be 
engaged largely with the development of the chick, using Foster and 
Balfour's Elements. 

(3) Taxonomy. The principles of taxonomy will be taught entirely 
by the laboratory method. Some work will be done in each of the 
greater groups, dissecting and classifying many of the common ani- 
mal forms. In this subject there will be used the College collection 
of periodicals and special works, together with the private library of 
special papers and monographs of the professor. The private 
zoological collections of the professor, now in the entomological 
laboratory, containing a large number of specimens, will be at the 
service of students. 

(4) Interrelations of Plants and Animals. It is through the close 
relations existing between the plant and animal worlds, that the 
latter has so important an influence on agricultural and other in- 
terests. The subject will be taught almost entirely by field work, 
the facts being brought out by the students themselves through ob- 
servation and experiment. A consideration of the subject in general 
will be followed by a study of the various insects injurious to field 
and garden crops. Beneficial species will also be considered, especial 
attention being given to the subject of the influence of insects in the 



-^ 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



85 



pollination and cross fertilization of plants. The field investigations 
will be supplemented by lectures. 

The department has a most exceptional outfit for thorough general 
work. It has, in connection with the department of horticulture 
and mycology, a lecture room and students' laboratory, the latter 
being a large, well-lighted room, provided with water, gas, slate- 
topped tables, and fully equipped with microscopes, re-agents and all 
other apparatus necessary in a study of general zoology. It has also 
a well equipped entomological laboratory and a costly experimental 
plant house in connection therewith. 



REGULATIONS. 

(1) Each student upon entering is required to sign his name in 
the matriculation book, and pledge himself to obey the rules and 

regulations of the College. 

(2) Every absence from recitation or examination is graded zero. 

(3) When the term grade of a cadet is lowered by reason of ab- 
sence for which a satisfactory excuse can be rendered, a special term 
re-examination may be subsequently granted, and the grade made 
on the special re-examintion alone is substituted for that previously 

re aT e Only sickness, as reported by the Surgeon, or being absent by 
reason of family sickness, will constitute a satisfactory excuse for 
arantine a re-examination. 

g When a cadet is called away from College by his parents hi. zeros 
for absences are not removed. 

(5) The term grade of a student is the average of h.s dai ly 
sesLal and ternfexamination marks, found by giving due weight to 

th « 6 rPr"a a tSonh e n senior class in full standing who are candidates 

(6) ravages ui Luc D Prpsident from all military 
for graduation may be excused by th * Jjjjj [ U me of 
drills, and also students over twenty one yea* .01 ag 

entering College that are , «J g » ££ Jjj fc 

DISTINCTIONS. 

a a •„ thP different subjects of each class to 
Distinctions are awarded >n the different , . 

those students whose grade for the entire ye 

cent. . ownr ded in public on commencement 

Certificates of Distinction are warded mp«Q ^ ^ tf ^ ^ 

day to those who obtain an ««»*T £ those wh o obtain three 

scribed studies of a regular class an 80phom0 re class, five 

distinctions in the freshman <*£.£ claS8> provide d they have 
in the junior class, and six in une 






■ 



86 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



satisfactorily passed all the regular examinations of that session, and 
have not received forty demerits during the year. 

A distinction is not given in the senior class if the average grade in 
any one subject is less than 75 per cent. 

RECORDS AND CIRCULARS. 

Daily records of the various exercises of the classes are kept by 
the officers of instruction. 

From the records a monthly circular, or statement, is sent to the 
parent or guardian. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Written monthly examinations on the studies of the month are 
held by each professor. 

At the end of each term written examinations, or written and oral 
are held on the studies passed over during that term. 

Special examinations are held only by order of the Faculty, and in 
no case will private examinations be permitted. 

Students falling below the minimum grade at. the finalexamina- 
tions, can be promoted to full standing in the next higher class onlv 
on satisfactory examinations at the opening of the next session 

It is required that every student who enters the College shall re- 
main through the examinations at the end of the term. Leaves of 
absence and honorable discharges will, therefore, not be granted 
within three weeks of the examination, except in extreme cases. 

LIBRARY. 

The library occupies an elegant, well-lighted room in the main 

9 SZnd f S ° tW ° 7?" adJaCent r °° mS ' Ifc ™^s o2 
9,000 bound volumes, including valuable reference and scientific 

books, with select editions of standard authors, and DtJerslSSe 

for students carefully and recently selected, it is kept olTetlt 

hours daily for the use of students as a reading room and 1S t £s 

made an important educational feature. 

MUSEUM. 

The museum occupies a large room in the third story It is nro 
vided with suitable cases and is equinned with ™i k, P " 

and models of an instructive character ValUabl6 SpecimeDS 

BOARDING HOUSES. 

quarters » or are g ui, ty £ ^^£ZT¥Z^7£ 
mapecto, U made to the Commandant on alternate gSE week' 



""^■w-*- 



^— — — — -I 




GENERAL LIBRARY. 



.. : 






X* 



$ 



w 



w 



5 

n 



3 

O 

3 



h j r 
ft PL 

"S • 



0) c 

t- 5 
08 O 

- £ 

CD *^ 

s _ 

D C 

i •► 

bC 

B 



as 
ft 




GENERAL LIBRARY. 




,' 




A~* 



4 



b 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 87 

Students, afters selecting their boarding-houses, are not permitted 
to make changes without obtaining permission from the President, 
and this permission is given only at the close of a term, except for 
special reasons. 

Permission to board and lodge at different houses will be granted 
only to seniors, to cadets twenty-one years of age and to those who 
are on the "honor roll." 

By special arrangement with the College authorities, Mrs. M. L. 
Mitchell and Mrs. A. DeBardeleben will accommodate students with 
board, lodging, fuel, etc., for $9.50 per month. 

EXPENSES. 

There is no charge for tuition for a resident of Alabama. 

Incidental fee, per half session $ 2 50 

Library fee, per half session — 1 00 

Surgeon's lee, per half session 2 50 

$ 6 00 

These fees are payable, $6.00 on matriculation and $6.00 
on February 1st. By order of the Trustees no fees can be 

remitted. 

For students entering after January 1st, the fees for a 

half session only are required. 

For a non-resident of the State there is a charge for 
tuition of $20.00 per session, payable $10.00 on matricula- 
tion and $10.00 on February 1st, in addition to the semi- 
annual fee of $6.00 payable by all students. 

Board, per month, with fuel and lights. .$ 12 00 to $15 00 

Fees 12-00to 12 00 

Board, lodging fuel and lights 108 00 to 135 00 

Washing 900to 900 

Books, e g tc.; say 8 00 to 15 00 

Total $137 00 $17100 

For non-resident student there should be added to, the amounts 
given above $20.00 for tuition. This tuition fee is not required of 
any non resident student who matriculated during the session of 

18 Si 7 tion for students not residents of Alabama is ?£ per session, 



<- 



88 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

unless remitted by the Trustees to worthy students upon the recom- 
mendation of the Faculty. 

The remission of this tuition fee to non-resident students will: be 
granted in the form of a free scholarship after the first year, to those 
who obtain a distinction the preceding year, or who, by reason of 
merit, are deemed worthy. 

UNIFORM. 

A uniform of cadet gray cloth is prescribed, which all uhder- 
graduate students are required to wear during the session. The 
uniforms are made, by a contractor, of excellent cloth manufactured 
at the Charlottesville mill. This suit, including cap, costs at present 
$14.00. It is neat and serviceable, and less expensive than ordinary 
clothing. 

CONTINGENT FEE. 

, .> * ■ - 

A contingent fee of five dollars is required to be deposited by each 
student on matriculation, to cover any special or general damage to 
college property for which he may be liable. 

At the close of the session the whole of the contingent fee, or the 
unexpended balance, is refunded to the student. 

AMOUNT OF DEPOSIT. 

Fees to be paid on entrance: 

Incidental fee $ 2* s 6x) 

Library { L00 

Surgeon _ 2 50 

Contingent fee , 5 qq 

Uniform [ 14.00 

$25.00 $25.00 
Tuition, non-resident 10 00 

$35.00 

Besides the above, the student should deposit with the Treasurer 

enough to pay for books, one month's board, incidentals, amounting 

to, say $25.00. Hence, a resident of Alabama should deposit with the 

Treasurer $50 00, a non-resident, $60.00. 

* * 

FUNDS OF STUDENTS. 

Parents and guardians are advised to deposit with the Treasurer 
of the College all funds desired for sons or wards, whether for regu- 
lar charges of college fees or board, or for any other purpose. It is 
the duty of this officer to keep safely all funds placed in his hands, 
and to pay all expenses incurred by the students, including board, 
uniform, books, etc., when approved. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



89 



When funds are deposited, checks are drawn on the Treasurer of 
the College by the cadet to pay his necessary expenses. These 
checks are paid only when officially approved. The approval is given 
only for necessary expenses, as stated in the catalogue, unless specially 
requested in writing by the parent. I 

The College cannot be held responsible \f or the expenses of a stu- 
dent, unless the funds are deposited with the Treasurer. No student 
should be permitted to have a large amount of pocket money, as it 
brings only trouble and encourages idleness. 

THESIS. 

Each applicant for a degree is required to write and submit to the 
Faculty an essay or oration and read and deliver the same at com- 
mencement, if required by the Faculty. 

It must be given to the Professor of English by the first of April. 

The subject must be submitted for approval by January 1st. 

LITEEARY SOCIETIES. 

There are two literary societies connected with the Col- 
lege — the Wirt and the Websterian. Each has a hall in the 
main building. 

These societies hold celebrations on the evenings of 
Thanksgiving Day and 22nd of February. They elect an- 
nually, with the approval of the Faculty, an orator to repre- 
sent them at the close of the year. 

EXERCISES IN ELOCUTION. 

On every Saturday morning, immediately after chapel services, 
oratorical exercises in declamation and in original orations are con- 
ducted by the Professor of English, in the presence of the Faculty 

and students. 

The first and second terms the students of the junior and sophomore 
classes are exercised in original orations and declamation. 

The second and third terms the members of the senior class read 
essays or deliver original orations. 

SOCIETY OF THE ALUMNI. 

The annual alumni oration is delivered by a member of the society, 
in Langdon Hall, on Alumni Day, Tuesday of commencement week. 
The following are the officers of the society : 

C. W. Ashcraft, '88, President. 
W. H. Blake, '79, Vice-President. 
W. L. Fleming, '96, Secretary." 
B. H. Crenshaw, '89, Treasurer. 
J. T, Ashqraft, '80, Orator for 1898, 






■■* 



V 



90 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

SUEGEON. 

The Surgeon is required to be present at the College 
daily, to visit at their quarters the cadets that are reported 
sick, and to give all requisite medical attention without 
other charge than the regular surgeon's fee, paid on enter- 
ing college. 

ACADEMIC TEAR 

The academic year for 1898-99 commences on Wednes- 
day, 14th September, 1898 (second Wednesday after the first 
Monday), and ends on Wednesday, 14th June, 1899 (second 
Wednesday after the first Monday), which is commencement 
dav. 

It is divided into three terms. The first term extends 
from the opening of the session to the 23rd of December ; 
the second term begins January 3rd, and ends March 19th ; 
the third term continues to the close of the session. 

RESOLUTION OF THE TKUSTEES. 

The following resolution has been adopted by the Trustees : 

That in view of increased facilities for instruction in agriculture 
and the technical departments of education now possessed by this 
College, especially in the mechanic arts, made possible by the recent 
donation from the State, the Faculty are authorized, in addition to 
the legal name of this College, to print on the catalogue the words 
ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, as significant of the ex- 
panded system of practical instruction in industrial science in the 
course of education now provided for. 

DONATIONS TO LIBRARY. 

U. S. Government.— Fublic Documents, 216 volumes. 

Senator Morgan.— Public Documents, 46 volumes. 

American Book Company.— Lights of Two Centuries. V 

Col. M. V. ifoore.— Rhyme of the Southern Rivers. 

Prof. C. C. Thach.—Yoet Lore, 2 volumes; Bolingbroke's Works, 
4 volumes ; Delivered from Afar, by Ralph Roberts. 

Governor of New South Wales.-A History of the Development of 
New South Wales. 

Dr. P. C. Candidus.— Pharmaceutical Reports (for the Department 
of Pharmacy). 



A labam a Polytechnic^Instttute. 

DONATIONS TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL 

ENGINEERING. 



91 



Stanley Electric Co., Pittsfield, Mass., one horse-power induction 
motor, with switch, transformer and condenser. 

Campbell & Wright, Jr., Roanoke, Ala., one "Star" 40 light 
dynamo. 

Cutter Electrical and Manufacturing Co., Philadelphia, Pa., one 
circuit breaker. 

Sentinel Electric Co., Wilmington, Del., one circuit breaker. 
D. & W. Fuse Co., Providence, R. I., samples of enclosed fuses. 
Shawmut Fuse Wire Co., Boston, Mass., samples of fuses. 
Chicago Fuse Wire & Mfg. Co., Chicago, 111., samples of fuses. 
Buckeye Electric Co., Cleveland, 0., samples of lamps. 
General Electric Co., Schenectady, N. Y., samples of lamps. 
Sawyer-Man Electric Co., Allegheny, Pa., samples of lamps. 
Fort Wayne Electric Corporation, Fort Wayne, Ind., photographs. 
Bossert Electrical Construction Co., Utica, N. Y., samples of con- 
duit boxes. 
Warren Electric Specialty Co., Warren, 0., samples of lamps. 
Beacon Lamp Co., N. J., samples of lamps. 
Columbia Incandescent Lamp Co., St. Louis, Mo., samples of lamps. 

PEKIODICALS. 

The following periodicals are regularly received in the 
main library and are accessible to students. 

LITERARY. 



QUARTERLIES. 



Current History, 
Economic Journal, 
Edinburgh Review, 
Political Science Quarterly, 

Atlantic Monthly, 
Blackwood's Magazine, 
Bookman, 
Book Reviews, 
Century Magazine, 
Chautauquan, 
Contemporary Review, 
Cosmopolitan, 
Eclectic Magazine, 
Education, 
Educational Review, 



Quarterly Journal of Economics, 
Quarterly Review, 
Sewanee Review. 

MONTHLIES. 

Fortnightly Review, 
Forum, 

Harper's Monthly, 
McClure's Magazine, 
Munsey's Magazine, 
Nineteenth Century, 
North American Review, 
Review of Reviews, 
Scribner's Magazine, 
Westminister Review. 






92 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



WEEKLIES. 



Academy, 

Critic, 

Dial, 

Harper's -Weekly, 

Independent (New York), 

Literary Digest, 



Literary World (Boston), 

Nation, 

Outlook, 

Saturday Review, 

Spectator. 



SCIENTIFIC. 



American Machinist, 
American Journal of Mathe- 
matics, 
Cassier's Magazine, 
Compressed Air, 
Electrical Engineer, 
Electrical Review, 
Electrical World, 
Electrician, 
Engineering, 
Engineering Magazine, 
Engineering and Mining, 



Engineering News, 

Journal of Franklin Institute, 

Machinery, 

Mathematical Monthly, 

Physical Review, 

Power, 

Scientific American, 

Sibley Journal of Mechanical 
Engineering, 

Transactions American Insti- 
tute of Electrical Engineers. 



SCIENTIFIC JOURNALS 

and newspapers received in the agricultural experiment station 

library. 

Botanical Gazette, 
Botanisches Centralblatt, 
Breeder's Gazette, 
Bulletin N. Y. Botanical Garden, 
Bu letin ToVrey Botanical Club, 
Bn etin Societe d'EntomoIogie, 
Bulletin Societe Mycologique, 
Bulletin Botanical Dept. Jamaica, 
Berliner Thierajrztliche Wochen- 
schrift, 

Chemiker-Zeitung, 

AnnalesdeTscie^rNaturelles- SSSW 
Botanique, - ° entral °latt f uer Bakteriologie, I, 

Annals Society Entomology, J*"?,' ' "l' Bakter ¥°«ie. H, 

Annals of Botany, Commercial and Financial Chroni- 

Annals & Mag. Natural History Com^. r ., 
Anthony's Photographic BuUrtft. n» P ~ Rendu8 ' 
Annals des K. K^ZCuT '$ " PJ * nter Journal - 
Aaa Gray's Bulletin, "' °° u "t'J Gentleman and Cultiva- 

. ' tor, 



American Agriculturist, 

American Cultivator, 

American Gardening, 

American Geologist, 

American Journal of Science, 

American Monthly Microscopi- 
cal Journal, 

American Naturalist, 
American Swineherd, 
Analyst, 

Anatomi8cher Anzeiger, 
Annales Agronomiques, 



4/ 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



93 



Die Landwirt. Versuchs-Sta- 
tionen, 

Deutsche Zeitschrift fuer Tier- 
medicine, 

Deutsche Landwirtschaftliche 
Presse, 

Drainage Journal, 

Dairy World, 

Elgin Dairy Report, 



Entomological Monthly Magazine, Kansas Farmer, 

■ri . 1 . _ • _ a. r #x »-» #1 «»t I »«4- Inn mVi 



• 

Journal Chemical Society (Eng- 
land), 
Journal of Horticulture, 
Journal Royal Agricultural So- 
ciety, 
Journal Applied Microscopy, 
Journal Royal Microscopical So- 
ciety, 
Journal Franklin Institute, 



Entomologist, 

Entom. Nachrichter, 

Erythea, 

Farm and Home, 

Farmer's Guide, 

Farm and Fireside, 

Farmer's Home, 

Farmer's Voice, 

Farming, 

Farmers' Gazette of New South 

Wales, 
Farm News, 



Florida Farmer and Fruit Grower,Pittonia, 

Forester, 

Garden and Forest, 

Gardener's Chronicle, 

Gentleman Farmer, 

Herwigia, 

Hoard's Dairyman, 

Homestead, 

Horticultural Gleaner, 

Hoistein-Friesian Register, 

Hufschmied, 



Landwirt Jahrbuecher, 
Market Garden, 
Massachusetts Ploughman, 
Memoirs Torrey Botanical Club, 
Montana Fruit Grower, 
Naturae Novitates, 
Natural Science, 
Nature, 

New England Florist, 
Optical Lantern Magazine, 
Our Grange Home, 
Practical Farmer, 



Philosophical Magazine, 
Photographic Bulletin, 
Photographic Times, 
Popular Science Monthly, 
Proceedings Academy of Natural 

Science, Philadelphia, 
Revue Bryologique, 
Revue Mycologique, 
Revue Horticole, 
Rural New Yorker, 

Science, 

Southern Cultivator, 

Southern Farmer. 



Indiana Farmer, 

Journal d' Agriculture Pratique, 

&a£S3*El of to*, n Farm Gazette, 

Natural History, 2S5t 

Journal African Chemical So- ^thernJUnter,^ 

cietv 

Journal of Chemical Industrial Snnshine,^^ ^ ^.^ 

JoulTof Comparative Pathol- Southern Farmer and Horticul- 

ogy and Therapeutics, JJ™^ ^ rmel> 
Journal of Geology, 



2«?7W 



■ 



*r 



94 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



Texas Farm and Ranch, 
Transactions Entomological So- 
ciety, 
Veterinary Journal, 
Veterinary Review. 
Wallaces' Farmer, 
Western Rural, 
\Vestern Creamers, 



Wilson's Photographic Magazine, 
Wool Record, 

Zeitschrift fuer Anal. Chem., 
Zeitschrift fuer Fleisch-und 

Milch-Hygiene, 
Zoologiseher Anzeiger, 
Zeitschrift fuer Tiermedicine. 



• ■ 



<J. 



Catalogue of the Alabama 
Polytechnic Institute 



1898 



f 



OCLC: 36819614 ' 
Entered: 19970429 



Type 


t a 




BLvl 


: s 




S/L: 







Desc 


s a 




1 


040 




2 


007 




3 


043 




4 


090 




5 


090 




6 


049 




7 


110 


2 


8 


245 


10 


9 


246 


10 


10 


260 




11 


300 




12 


310 




13 


362 





14 


515 




15 


500 




16 


533 





*d 1997. *c 

17 539 

18 610 20 





Rec stat: 


n 








Replaced: 


19970429 


Used: 


19970429 


I 


Srce: d 


GPub: s 


Ctrl : 


Lang: eng 


a 


Conf : 


Freq: a 


MRec: 


Ctry: alu 




EntW: 


Regl : r 


ISSN: 


Alph : a 




Cont: 


DtSt : d 


Dates: 1894, 


,1899 I 



f *f u *g b *h a *i u *j p I 



ELvl: 
Form: 
Orig: 
SrTp: 

AAA mo AAA 1 
h *b c *d b *e 
n-us-al I 
LD271 .A76 I 
*b I 
AAAA 1 

Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. 1 
Catalogue of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute *h [microform] 1 
Catalog of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute I 
Auburn, Ala. : *b The College, *c 1894-1899. 1 
6 v. : *b ill. ; *c 23 cm. I 
Annual f 

1893-94-1898-99. 1 

Issue for 1898-99 carries designation 1899-1900. 1 
"State Agricultural and Mechanical College." 1 

Microfilm. *m 1894-1899. *b Mobile, Ala. *c Document Technology, 
microfilm reels : negative ; 35 mm. I 
d *b 1894 *c 1899 *d alu *e u *f u *g a I 
Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama *x Curricula *x 



Periodicals • 1 

19 780 00 Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. *t Catalogue of 
he State Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama f 

20 785 00 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. *t Catalogue of the Alabama 
Polytechnic Institute 1 

► 21 830 USAIN State and Local Literature Preservation Project 1 



V. vl 



>*l 
















AUBURN UNIVERSITY 
LIBRARY 




At] 
LD271 

.A ?6 
IP 93/50 

C * <- 




# 



.\tf 



\« 



A* 6 




Mk. 



c.n- 





f 






«# 



n 



V 



f 



AT .2- 







-» I 




Polytechnic Institute . 





> _^^^^ a a_^ M __ a _ 



riWHi 



T 



CATALOGUE 



\ 



OF THE 




Iabmrra : 




1 

i 



nstitote. 



: 



STATE COLLEGE, 



FOB THE 



Benefit of * Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts. 



AUBURN, ALABAMA. 
1890-1900. 



MONTGOMERY, ALA.: 
BROWN PRINTING COMPANY 
1899. 



5 



i 



U. 



AUB' 



J 



i iwfif—i— > .-.^ y 



TRUSTEES. 



^ 



V 



-»♦•- 



i/is Excellency, JOSEPH F. JOHNSTON, President Ex-officio, 

JOHN W. ABEROROMBIE, Superintendent of Education.. Ex-officio. 



K 



^ 




J. G. Gilchrist (term expires 1903) Hope Hull. 

Tancrbd Betts (term expires 1903) Huntsvllle. 

Walter C. Whitaker. . (term expires 1903) .Tuscaloosa. 



Jonathan Haralson (term expires 1901). . . Selma. 

Thos. Williams (term expires 1901) Wetumpka. 

J. A. Bilbro .-. . . .(term expires 1901).. ........ .... Gadsden. 



I. F. Culver (term expires 1899) Union Springs . 

T. H. Frazer (term expires 1899) .Mobile. 

H. Clay Armstrong (term expires 1899) Auburn. 

R. H. Duggar (term expires 1899) Gallion. 



E. T. Glenn, Treasurer. 
J. H. Drake, M. D., Surgeon. 




m—mm 



Ml 



a \f 






8ARKSDALE 

*6*4 FACULTY AND OFFICERS. 

Wm. LdROY BROUN, M. A., LL. D., 
President and Professor of Physics and Astronomy. 

OTIS D. SMITH, A. M., 
• Professor of Mathematics. 

P. H. MELL, M. E.,Ph. D., 
Professor of Botany and Geology. 

JAMES H. LANE, 0. E., A. M., Ph. D., LL. D., 
Professor of Civil Engineering and Drawing. 

CHARLES C. THACH, A. M., 
Professor of English and Political Economy. 

GEORGE PETRIE, M. A., Ph. D., 
Professor of History and Latin. 

A. F. McKISSICK, A. M.. M. M. E., 
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Physics. 

B. B. ROSS, M. So., 
Professor of General and Agricultural Chemistry and State Chemist. 

CHARLES H. ROSS, C. E., Ph. D.. 
Professor of Modern Languages. 

J. J. WILMORE, M. E., 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director of Laboratory. 

C. A. CARY, B. So., D. V. M., 
Professor of Physiology and Veterinary Science. 

E. R. MILLER, Phar. M., M. So., 
Professor of Pharmacy. 

J. F. DUGGAR, M. So., 
Professor of Agriculture. 

F. S. EARLE, 
Professor of Biology and Horticulture. 

COPL. B. S. PATRICK, 
Commandant and Acting Professor of Military Science. 

R. H. TRAMMELL, C. E., 
Instructor in Mechanic Arts. 



i 



J 



207882 



MM 



^M 



AMtAiMfciftMta 



I 



I 



B. H. CRENSHAW, M. E., 
Instructor in Mechanic Arts and Mathematics. 

0. L. HARE, M. So., 
Instructor in Chemical Laboratory. 

H. H.KYSER.E. & M. E., 
Instructor in Physical Laboratory. 

H. H. SMITH, M. So., 
Assistant Librarian. 

M. T. FULL AN, 

Assistant in Mechanic Arts. 

A. H. Clark, B. Sc, 
Assistant in English. 

W. M.WILLIAMS, M. Sc, 
Assistant in English and Mathematics. 

G. N. MITCHAM, M. Sc, 
Assistant in Mathematics. 

F. G. MORRISS, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Civil Engineering and Drawing. 

A. S.MOSES, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Mechanic Arts. 

A. B.RANSOM, B.Sc, 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

J. R. McCALLA,B. Sc, 
Assistant in Agriculture. 

JNO. HARALSON, B. So. , 
Assistant in Electrical Engineering. 

B. B. WARWICK, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Veterinary Science. 

J. W. KING, B.Sc, 
Assistant in History and Latin. 

W. E. JOHNSON, 

> Assistant in Horticulture. J 

C. C. Thach, 
Superintendent of Library. 

0. D. Smith, 
Corresponding Secretary. 



I 










\ 



■ m 



v 



■ hf ■ * ' ^rw ^ 



OFFICERS 



OF THE 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 



COMMITTEE OF TRUSTEES ON EXPERIMENT STATION. 

I. F. Culver. Union Springs. 

. G. Gilchrist Hope Hull. 

lH. Clay Armstrong , . • Auburn. 

STATION COUNCIL. 

Wm. LeRoy Broun President. 

P. H. Mell • Director and Botanist. 

B. B. Ross Chemist. 

0. A. Cary • • • • -Veterinarian. 

J. F. Duggar Agriculturist. 

F. 8. Earle Biologist and Horticulturist. 

J. T. Anderson Associate Chemist. 

. ASSISTANTS. 

C. L. Hare. First Assistant Chemist. 

j q Burton Second Assistant Chemist. 

T. U Culver Superintendent of Farm. 



a 









► ■• 




O^tj,. 




-. 



V 



1 




— 



■j^^^^^^™^^^™— ^^^bi^^ 



X 















<5 :f> 



^ 







i i 



I 



n 



■ 



i 




OBJECT OF THE INSTITUTE. 



The Institute is a distinctive school of Science and 
Lts applications ; being also the State College for the 
benefit of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts estab- 
ished by the State in 1872, by endowing it with the 
and-grajit appropriation made by the U. S. Congress 

nl862; 

The leading object of the Institute, in conformity with 
he act of Congress and the acts of the State Legislature, 
s to teach the principles and applications of science. 

In its courses of instruction it gives prominence to the 
ciences and their applications, especially to those that 
relate to agriculture and the mechanic arts ; and at the 
same time the discipline and liberal education obtained 
by the study of language and other sciences is not neg- 
lected. 

All students are required to study the English lan- 

uage. The Latin, French and German languages are 

lso taught, and opportunity for their study is offered to 
[students in any course. 

The special and technical instruction given is thus 
based on a sound, general education. 

In its different courses of education, work of great 
value to the youth of the State is accomplished by fitting 
them by a thorough science-discipline, in which manual 
training in the lower classes is made a prominent feature, 
for the successful and honorable performance of the re- 
sponsible duties of life . 

While every attention is given to the mental discipline 
of the students in endeavoring to train them to habits 
of accurate scientific thought, and thus to qualify them 
for the duties of life, their moral and Christian training 
will always constitute the prominent care and thought 
Of t^he Faculty. 




■-* ■ 



____ 



■*■*■ 



Mltmmm 



■Ml 



8 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 















LABORATORIES AND FACILITIES FOR INSTRTJC- 

.'■ TION. 

*lie Institute now possesses facilities for giving labora. 
tory instruction in applied science in the following de- 
partments : 

I IN AGRICULTURE AND HORTICULTURE. 

The farm contains 226 acres, and is supplied with 
illustrative specimens of stock of select varieties. 

The agricultural experiment station, established in 
connection with the College, where experiments and 
scientific investigations relating to agriculture are daily 
made, affords unusual opportunities to students to be- 
come familiar with agriculture, its defects and remedies. 

The students of agriculture accompany the professor 
in the field, garden, conservatory, stock-yard, etc., where 
lectures are delivered in the presence of the objects dis- 
cussed, and during the year exercises in practical agri- 
culture of an educational character are given the students 
who enter upon this course of study. 

II — IN MECHANIC ARTS. 

The laboratory of mechanic arts is used as an auxiliary 
in industrial education, and as a school of manual train- 
ing in the arts that constitute the foundation of various 
industrial pursuits. The work performed by the students I 

mtructme in character, as in any other laboratory, and 
he classes are taught in sections by a series of graded 

lessons under the supervision of the professor, fn the 
ower 1 f the j each student enterg 

school and is assigned three exercises a week, each ex- 
ercise being two hours long. I 
The object of this laboratory is not to teach a trade 

1 and° Is UCa n' t0 "r PHne aDd train the *• «d S 

manu',1 I J "J,? 6 "^ a " d thus ^ associating 
manual and mental training, to educate thoroughly the 
student for the duties of life, whatever may be his voca 



/ 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 9 

tion. There is no attempt to teach students special skill 
in constructing articles of commercial value, but all the 
exercises are systematically arranged and designed for 
purposes of education. 

The wood department is located in a commodious hall, 
90x50 feet, and is provided with a twenty-five horse- 
power Corliss engine, a planer, circular saw, band-saw, 
two scroll saws, a buzz planer, a pattern maker's lathe, 
twenty-four stands, each with a lathe and a full set of 
•tools, and thirty benches for carpenter work with the 
(tools requisite for construction. 

A brick building, 30x87 feet, with two rooms, has 
|been constructed especially for instruction in working 

ron. 

One room is equipped with sixteen forges and tools 
required for a forge department, and the other with a 
Colliau cupola furnace, a core oven, a brass furnace, 
molding benches, foundry crane constructed by students, 
and special tools for use in a foundry. 

The forge and foundry rooms are furnished with a 
ISturtevant fan and exhauster, supplied with power from 
la ten-horse power engine, constructed by the students 
[in mechanic arts. 

The machine department occupies a brick building, 
30x50 feet, and is equipped with ten engine lathes, one 
speed lathe, one 20-inch drill press, one 10-inch sensi- 
tive drill, one post drill, one 16-inch shaper, one 5-foot 
planer, one universal milling machine, a corundum tool 
grinder, a small emery grinder, a universal cutter and 
reamer grinder, a No. 1 Brown & Sharpe universal 

(grinding m-achine, and a power hack saw. 

The chipping and filing department is arranged with 
[benches, vises and tools for twelve students. 

The tool room is well supplied with special tools for 
Juse in instruction, including a machine for grinding 
twist drills. The rooms are lighted with electricity 
whenever necessary. 



■■■■ 



1 






Pv 



10 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



Ill — IN PRACTICAL CHEMISTRY. 

The chemical laboratory is supplied with modern ap- 
paratus, and in its equipment affords excellent facilities 
for instruction in practical chemistry and for investiga- 
tion. 

The investigations that are undertaken in this labora- 
tory by scientific experts, in connection with the work 
of the agricultural experiment station, are of especial 
value to advanced students, and afford them unusual 
opportunities to learn the methods of scientific research. 
The building contains a large general laboratory that 
accommodates sixty students, a lecture room with a 
capacity for one hundred seats, and nine other rooms, all 
appropriated to instruction and research in chemistry. 

IV — IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

The electrical laboratory is well supplied with modern 
appliances for instruction in electrical engineering. It 
occupies two large rooms in the basement and is equipped 
with many fine instruments of precision : Kelvin deka- 
ampere balance, Kelvin graded current and potential 
galvanometers, Cardew voltmeter, Weston voltmeters 
and ammeter, Queen's magnetic vane voltmeter and am- 
meter, Thomson watt-meter, Hartman and Braun volt- 
meter, Kohlrausch ammeter, Wood ammeter, Weston 
alternating current voltmeter, Weston direct reading 
watt-meter, Queen's "Acme" testing set, Rowland- 

D'Arsonvalgalvanometers^elvinelectrostaticvoltmeter, 
Edison ammeters, and many other current-measuring 
instruments, resistance boxes, Wheatstone bridges, con- 
densers, telephones, batteries, magnets, etc. 

The dynamos occupy a separate building and are. op- 
erated by a twen^pftve horse power Atlas engine, and a 
thirty-five horse power Westinghouse engine. In this 
building are installed the following dynamos : 



w—mamm 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



11 



Edison compound 12 Kilo-watt generator, Thomson- 
Houston 150 light 110 volt dynamo, Weston 150 volt 25 
ampere generator, Crocker-Wheeler one horse power 
notor, Ideal 3 phase alternator, Brush 6 arc light 
lynamo with lamps, two Baxter street car 
notors, % 20 horse power each (so connected 
is to be used as direct or alternating current motors or 
generators) , one 5 horse power three phase motor, one 
General Electric 20 horse power motor, one 40 light 
(hunt dynamo, one Edison 3 Kilo-watt generator, one 
Stanley induction motor with condenser, two bi-phase 
hduction motors (built by students) , one 9 light Thom- 
[on-Houston arc machine, two phase alternator and 500 

olt 20 afnpere generator, made by students. There is 
ilso in connection with this department at the experi- 
nent station, a ten horse power motor, made by stu- 
lents, which is operated by the 500 volt generator in the 

ynamo room. 

v — IN PHYSICS. 

In the College building provision is made for ele- 
nentary laboratory work in the department of^ physics. 
Special rooms are appropriated for this purpose, and are 
quipped with the necessary appliances for instruction 
n practical physics. 

VI IN MINERALOGY. 

This laboratory occupies a convenient room in the 
msement, and is provided with tables and appliances to 
iccommodate thirty students, with an excellent collec- 
ion of minerals. 

VII — IN BOTANY. 

In the work of the agricultural experiment station 
here is a botanical garden under the charge of the pro- 
essor of botany, investigations in botany are given 
pecial attention, and opportunities are offered advanced 
tudents for practical work in a laboratory especially 



r 






12 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



'i 



i 



fittted with microscopes, tables, a dark room for photo- 
graphic work, and appliances needed for instruction and 
research. This department is provided with Auzoux's 
clastic models of seeds and flowers for teaching botany. 

VIII — IN BIOLOGY. 

The laboratory in this department adjoins the lecture 
room of the professor, and is furnished with tables, ex- 
cellent microscopes and appliances for investigation. 
Each student of the class works under the supervision 
of the professor. 

IX — IN ENGINEERING AND SURVEYING. 

The necessary apparatus for field work, including 
transits, levels, plane table, models of bridges, etc., is 
provided for the use of the students, and the customary 
exercises in the field are given. 

» X IN DRAWING. 

All students in the lower classes are required to take 
drawing, a study which tends to discipline the mind, as 
well as to train the eye and hand to accuracy of observa- 
tion and execution. A large, well-lighted drawing-room, 
which will accommodate fifty students, is provided with 
tables, lock boxes, etc. 

XI — IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

The mechanical course has been extended to include 
experimental work in mechanical engineering. 

The apparatus available for this instruction is as fol- 
lows : A 45 horse power Imperial Cross compound en- 
gine, especially arranged for experimental work, sup- 
plied with Wheeler surface condenser and Deane air pump 
and circulating pump, a 25 horse power Harris-Corliss 
engine, a 35 horse power Atlas engine, two 9 horse 
power engines constructed by students, the boilers be- 
longing to the regular power plant, a small engine and 
boiler for the special purpose of making efficiency tests, 
a Deane duplex steam pump, a four horse power gaso- 



****>mtmmm 



m 



— , 



■■■■^■■■■■■■i 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 13 

line engine, an Ericsson hot air engine, a New York air 
pump, a Westinghouse air pump, four steam engine in- 
dicators, a separating calorimeter, thermometers, a 
pyrometer, scales, a standard steam guage with ap- 
paratus for testing steam gauges, a Crosby dead weight 
tester with weights for correcting the standard gauge, a 
35,000-pound testing machine, a Henning micrometer 
extensometer, and a Carpenter calorimeter with the 
necessary auxiliary apparatus for determining the heat- 
ing value of different kinds of coal. 

This work is now carried on in the lower story of the 
annex to the chemical laboratory. This room is 30x60 
feet in size and was specially designed and fitted up for 
this purpose. A three-inch steam main has been laid 
from the boiler house, thus securing a steam sup- 
ply in the building for all work requiring it. The work 
is thoroughly practical, and it is desired to extend it as 
rapidly as the funds available for the purchase of appa- 
ratus will allow. 

XII IN PHYSIOLOGY AND VETERINARY SCIENCE. 

There has been constructed for the veterinary depart- 
ment a new and separate two-story 'building with nine 
rooms. It is provided with lecture room, office, working 
and operating rooms for clinical practice, and museum 
with skeletons of the domestic animals for instruction. 
Free clinics are given every Saturday for the benefit of 
the students in veterinary science. 

XIII — IN PHARMACY. 

The laboratory of this department occupies the second 
floor of the annex to chemical laboratory, and is pro- 
vided with a sufficient supply of drugs and apparatus 
necessary for instruction in pharmaceutical preparations. 

The students work in the laboratory with the pro- 
fessor, from five to eight hours, six days in the week. 

It is expected to increase the facilities as means are 
available • 






/ 



I 

I 






•I 






\ 




14 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



MILITARY TACTICS. 



Instruction in this department is given in conformity/ 
with the act of Congress. Students receive the benefit 
of regular military drill, and in addition the military 
system is used as a means of enforcing discipline and 
securing good order, promptness and regularity in the 
performance of academic duties. 

This department is supplied with new cadet muskets 
and accoutrements for the corps. 



COLLEGE BUILDINGS. 

The frontispiece is a representation of the main College building. 
It is 160 x 71 feet and contains forty-five rooms. This building is not 
used for dormitories for students, but is appropriated to purposes of 
instruction and investigation. 

It contains the lecture rooms and offices of the professors, labora- 
tories, library, museum, armory, etc. 

LANGDON HALL. 

This is a two-story building, 90 x 50 feet. The seoond story is the 
audience hall, used for commencement and other public occasions. 
The first story is appropriated to the laboratory of mechanic arts. 

THE CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

As shown on the opposite page, is a two story structure, 40 by 60 
feet, with a rear projection, 35 by 60 feet, of one-story and basement, 
and contains eight rooms. The exterior is of pressed brick, with cut 
stone trimmings and terra cotta ornamentation. 

In the basement are ample accommodations for assaying and 
storage. 

The main laboratory will accommodate sixty students, and contains 
improved working tables, with water, gas and every necessary appli- 
ance for chemical work. 

The second story contains a lecture room with seats and tablets for 
eighty students. Around the lecture room are cases containing crude 
and manufactured products, illustrating agricultural and mechanical 
chemistry, prominent subjecls taught in the institution. 

ANNEX TO CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

This is a three-story brick building, containing rooms for mechani- 
cal engineering, and drawing. 



MMm 



• m i > 






ML 

•» 



r 



mm 



GRADUATES IN 1898. 



CLASS OF 1898. 
HONOR GRADUATES. 

COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 

Arthur McBride Ransom Georgia. 

COURSE IN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

T , , Dallas . 

Jonathan Haralson. 

COURSE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

% . . Talladega. 

Frank Greene Mornss • • • • 

GENERAL COURSE. 

„ Geneva. 

} Halbert Clyde Ray Montgomery. 

i Alexander Humphreys Clark , ■ 

COURSE IN PHARMACY. 

John Wesley Williams 

DEGREES. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. 

.. Florida. 

John Cocke Abernethy Marengo. 

Lemuel Sledge Allen Lee 

Erin Black .......... • • ' v Lee * 

Mary Wright Boyd. Montgomery 

William Hamill Bruce .Montgomery 

Alexander Humphreys Clark Lowndes. 

Henry Neal Coleman ' Crens haw. 

George Oliver Dickey .Talladega. 

Duncan Patterson Dixon Lee 

Clifford Lamar Edwards ..'..Marengo. 

Richard Roe Eppes • .Lee. 

Frank Farley .Shelby. 

William Shelby Garner '.'.'.'.... .Georgia. 

Elmer Wynn Gray .Dallas. 

Jonathan Haralson • y " L ee . 

Francis Williams Hare ^Florida. 

Charles Edward Harrison ' 



16 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

Harry Streety Houghton Jefferson. 

William Earle Hudmon Lee. 

Joseph Wood King Georgia. 

Absalom Mason Kennedy Montgomery 

Jessie Hamilton Lockhart Georgia. 

John Richard McCalla Lee. 

Peter Mastin Mclntyre. Montgomery 

Julia Hill Moore L ee 

Frank Greene Morriss ............Talladega. 

Ashleigh Ktrudwick Moses Baldwin 

John Sanford Paden Etowah' 

Alexander Simpson Pow Jefferson. 

Annie Lucinda Purifoy L ee 

Arthur McBride Ransom ......" Georgia 

Halbert Clyde Ray .'...'....'...'.Geneva 

James Barrie Shivers " Perrv 

Newton Caraway Smith Shelbv 

Clifford West Stewart M « ♦ 

' Edward Wadsworth Stone..'.;..: Mon!" 7 ' 

Rush Price Strong ...'.'.'.'. '.'.'.V Mob f * * 

Almuth Cunningham Vandiver . . " " " To^? ! 

Bishop Billing Warwick.... £ a adega. 

John Wesley Williams .''.'.'.'..'''' Talladega. 

Joseph Leonard Wood fj]? 6 ' 

Neander Montgomery Woods Mobile. 

Arthur Williamson Greene (c^^^^ 

CIVIL ENGINEER. 

George Nathan Mitcham 

Georgia. 

ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEER. 

Thomas Ganaway Conner 

Arthur Williamson Greene Macon ■ 

William Welch Hill Chambers. 

Benjamin 8weat Patrick. Talladega. 

S. Carolina. 

MASTER OP SCIENCE. 

James Washington Culver. 

George Webster Duncan... Lee * 

John Buford Hobdy Lee 

George Michael Holley. Bullock. 

Edwin Boyce Joseph Georgia. 

William Parker Leonard Montgomery. 

William Jacob Nixon Georgia. 

Frederick Loyd Tate Tennessee. 

Reuben David Webb..: ..\.\ Russell. 

Coosa. * 




» 



DISTINGUISHED STUDENTS. 



Students who receive a grade above 90 in three studies in the 
freshman class, in four in the Sophomore, in five in 
the junior, and in six in the senior, are dis- 
guished for excellence in schol- 
arship, and are awarded 

HONOR CERTIFICATES. 

The following students received honor certificates in 1698: 

SENIOR CLASS. 

Erin Black • ^ee. 

Mary Wright Boyd • ■ • ^ ee ■ 

Alexander Humphreys Clark Montgomery. 

Frank Farley *f e 

William Shelby Garner • £11 

Jonathan Haralson ™ vi" l 

Charles Edward Harrison * Jonaa. 

Harry Streety Houghton , Jefferson. 

William Earle Hudmon tf e - -■ 

Jessie Hamilton Lockhart • • <*eorgia. 

Julia Hill Moore • • ' ']?*: 

Frank Greene Morriss •••••• -Talladega. 

Alexander Simpson Pow Jetterson. 

Annie Lucinda Purifoy • ee ' 

Arthur McBride Ransom Georgia. 

™ « . ™ j t» Geneva. 

Halbert Clyde Ray 

Rush Price Strong • 

John Wesley Williams. • 

HONOR STUDENTS IN THE JUNIOR CLASS. 

COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 

Flake Earle Farley 

COURSE IN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

„ , _ _. , r Florida. 

Julien Chandler Yonge .• 

GENERAL COURSE. 

' - ...Georgia. 

William Oscar Scroggs 






18 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



junior CLASS. 

Alston Boyd Tennessee. 

Bailey Edgar Brown Morgan. 

Mattie Lucile Burton L ee 

Thomas Greene Bush ; Calhoun 

McNeill Crawford .........Lee 

Marion Dawson .......Elmore. 

Flake Earle Farley Lee 

Jones Stephen Gilliland .Coosa 

Kate Meade Lane L ee 

Lottie Everard Lane L ee 

^amFennen ^onneii... :::::::::;:;:;;;;;:;;;;;;; Madi80n 

Hattie Marshall Phelps Lee 

Mary Evelyn Robinson [] ,.......][[[ Lee 

William Oscar Scroggs G . 

William Alexander Thomason. i .".'.'.'.". R«nHnini, 

Julien Chandler Yonge ^ ^^ig^ ' 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

John Samuel Black T 

Guy French Boyd ^ 

Jesse Wright Boyd [., j 

William Crawford Dowdell. j' 

Luther Noble Duncan. " i" 66, 

Sherman Guy Forbes. .Franklin. 

Edward Zellars Heard * Henry. 

John Paul Illges * Lee * 

Moses Frank Kahn. . . ' Geor g i a 

Charles Wellington Nixon! ! ! " ' Lee * 

Hiram Perry Powell. Tennessee. 

James Richard Rutland. * * ' Geor g ia - 

John Winfred ShuflF '"* Chambers. 

Talladega. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

William LeGrande Burnett. 

John Dreway Foy Barbour. 

Arthur Flournoy Jackson! ! Barbour. 

Abram Hill Mitchell Georgia. 

Gaius Whitfield ' Le ©- 

Edward Houston Wills Marengo. 

Lee. 




CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 

FOR THE SESSION OF 1898-99- 

r * 

Graduate Students. 

r Residence is Alabama when State is not given.] 

1 RESIDENCE. 

NAME. T 

. _. , .Lee. 

Erin Black Lee 

Toccoa cowl • ;;;;;;; Lownde9 . 

Henry Neal Co eman 

Jonathan Haralson 

Francis Williams Hare • 

Charles Edward Harrison g« , 

Joseph Wood King B 

John Richard McOalla • 

George Nathan Mitcham '.Talladega. 

Frank Greene Momss TUldwin 

Ashleigh Strudwick Moses ȣ dwUL 

Annie Lucinda Purif oy Georgia 

Arthnr McBride Ransom • • * de 

Bishop Billing Warwick • « B 

John Wesley Williams ^ 

George Wngley 

TJndebgbaduate Students, 
seniob class. 

.„ Marengo. 

LeRoy James Allen . . • ^^ 

Jesse Maldrie Atkinson ^^ 

Emmett Gale Buck '....... Tennessee. 

Alston Boyd • • • • • " ' " T 

Harriet Lavinia Dabney Bondurant Lee. 

BMley Edgar Brown • ^^ 

Mattie Lucile Burton Calhoun. 

Thomas Greene Bush 



20 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



f 



i 



in 



Charles Wallace Collins 

McNeill Crawford. 

Colonel Seldon Crew 

Frederick Robert Daly 

Bolivar Davis 

Marion Dawson 

James Francis Dobbin : 

Flake Earle Farley 

Arthur Henry Feagin 

Hugh Mathersou Fenn 

Michael Thomas Fullan 

Jones Stephens Gilliland 

John Ross Glenn 

Theophilus Eaton Goodwin. . . 

Fannie Maud Holstuu 

Felix Grundv Horn 

Kate Meade Laue 

Lottie Everard Lane 

Harry Toulmin Lay 

Thomas Henuiugton McAxJory 

Isham Fenuell McDonnell 

Charles Henry Merritt 

Jackson Chad wick Minge 

Benjamin Otey Minge 

Hartley Alley Moon . 
James Roy den Peabody . 
Hattie Marshall Phelps . , 
Lawrence Bratton Rainey 
Mary Evelyn Robinson . . , 

John Osgood Rush 

William Oscar Scroggs. . 

James Cary Slaton 

Joseph Wilson Sutcliffe . . 

Dozier Turner 

James Alfred Ward 

Thomas William Wert . . . 
George Madison Wheeler. 
Julien Chandler Yonge. . . 



...... 



« * . . . . . 



• • . . 



Hale. 
Lee. 
Coosa. 
Jefferson. 
Jefferson. 
Elmore. 
Florida. 
Lee. 
Bullock. 
Barbour. 
Georgia. 
Coosa. 
Lee. 

, Crenshaw. 
Lee 

Sumter. 
Lee. 
Lee. 

, Montgomery. 
Jefferson. 
Madison. 
Chilton. 
Marengo. 
Marengo. 
Coosa. 
Georgia. 
Lee. 

DeKalb. 
Lee. 

Autauga. 
. Georgia. 
Macon. 
Louisiana. 
Elmore. 
Madison. 
Morgan. 
Madison. 
Florida, 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 21 

junior class. 

y 

Frank Hunter Anderson . . Bullock. 

William Lawrence Anderson Montgomery. 

Fletcher Ash craft . . Lauderdale. 

Jt u b n rt . Pinrnrrfhrtrh rrn .•'.. .fenifflrit - 

Malcolm Alfred Beeson Etowah. 

John Samuel Black Lee. 

Guy French Boyd Lee. 

Jesse Wright Boyd Lee. 

Millard Morse Brooks ■•/. Escambia. 

Abnui' Mauun Bmjliwiiaii (c) ramS^-. 

Edwin Bukofzer. . .Tennessee. 

Judson Lamar Burke ....Lee. 

Andrew Crozier Cameron Jefferson. 

, Frank Boyard Chapman, fc) ^ .^ . u , -^^M^k." 

*£afl^Rcliblflon"OuMf: . TV. • • • • Lee. f"^ 

Emma Beall Culver Lee. * 

William Crawford Dowdell .... Lee. 

Ellis Madison Duncan Franklin. 

Luther Noble Duncan Franklin. 

Eutherford Sylvanus Finch Montgomery. 

John Jefferson Flowers Butler. 

Sherman Guy Forbes ...... . ....... Dale. 

Earle Humphreys Foy . , Barbour. 

TiiijiiiViiTiilimf i i.i uarnnnr. 

(^arles^HjpwrPttHer (c) mtiwH»iH. 

JA ,mrin"f)iHwy | flu |i ai>iin .■Tnllap'oooa. 

Bertha Mae Grout L _ ee - 

Wittfom Wontheij y H i tuuon ( c) ■ . • '■ 

Roland B. Hall : jZrlou. 

Harry Young Hall • • ' 

Charles Lewis Harold .Escambia. 

Edward Zellars Heard | jee - 

MabelHeard («) > ^ e _ 

Ja^s^te^6*^iae« (c) .X4w*rtK?rs. 

Mary Katherine Hollifield ^ ee - 

(c) Conditioned. 



■"■« 



I 



!> 





22 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

John Paul Illges Georgia. 

Geprgp Martin likes (c) . A./. .^^. ._.., Montgomery 

v^^^nttoses HFrant Kah# Jjee: » 

Wilber Edrald Kelley Jefferson. 

Henry Daes Lesesne Mobile. 

"William Christopher Martin Lee. 

/ v. John Maples Eussell. 

Enoch Marvin Mason Lee. 

(c) 4 ... 

James Hardie McGehee Montgomery. 

3 Kenneth Bethune McKenzie . ./. ^r^r. . . . Jitter. ^ 

^fera jfifiS^ .... Marshall. 

William Livingston Neill Jefferson. 

Charles Wellington Nixon Tennessee. 

William Forney Osburn . . Lee. 

Hiram Perry Powell .Georgia. 

Fleming James Rigney \ Madison. 

James Richard Rutland Chambers. 

William Stowe Rutledge Lee. 

««M (CJ : : r. : : : z : KBSr^- 

Joseph Manning Steiner Butler. 

Horace Ware. ... .Calhoun. 

John Ttiillndgo WiVHmnn JeSwwwi. 

Jan—a Wi>Mr ^^Oftfttfr CtWfgia. 

Moses Conrad Wright. .Macon, y _ / 

ftlOPIIOMQRE CLASS. 

Oliver Burnside Andrews Tennessee. 

Stearnes Pearson Baker ... Tallapoosa. 

Joseph Nathaniel Barker Georgia. 

Frank Carlisle Bivings Georgia. 

Thomas Bragg ... . Lee. 

Kenneth Bradford. * . Montgomery. 

William LeGrande Burnette Barbour. 

(c) Conditioned. 




1 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 23 

Salmon Holmes Burns Lee. 

Henry Herschel Conner Macon. 

James Lorenzo Deaton Georgia. 

John Isham Dorsey (c) Lee. 

William Hamilton Eager Tennessee. 

John Heron Edmonson Barbour. 

Eugene Flynn Enslen Jefferson. 

Malcolm Nassau Fleming Georgia. 

John Drewry Foy Barbour. 

William Alexander Frazer Lee. 

Walter Lee Greene Lee. 

Jacob Lionel Haas . Montgomery. 

Alexander Cameron Hannon Montgomery. 

Paul Shields Haley Walker. 

Wallace Benjamin Harrison Talladega. 

Michael Smith Harvey Lee. 

Daniel Haygood Haynes Lowndes. 

William Baxter Haynes Lowndes. 

Charles Henry Haynes , Bullock. 

James Kelly Hay me .Montgomery. 

Arber Samuel Hertz Georgia. 

Robert Holland Hood Jefferson. 

Frank Dowsing Howard . Autauga. 

Edwin Dewitt Huguley Georgia 

Blair Hughes (c) •-• Jefferson. 

Arthur Flournoy Jackson , Georgia. 

James Baxter Jackson Lee. 

Jefferson Franklin Jones Sumter. 

Gordon Houston Jones (c) Montgomery. 

Myron Daniel Kahn Lee - m 

Claude Kauffman • • M° blle - 

Emmett Stephens Killebrew Dale. 

Howard Malcolm Kilpatrick Georgia. 

Edward Kelley .... • Montgomery. 

Karl Edward Lindrose Mississippi. 

William Eeid Lancaster (c) ^ee. 

(c) Conditioned. 




-__* mm 



*m 



I 



24 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

Daniel Stacy Martin Barbour. 

Robert Murdoch Martin Barbour. 

Earle Edwin McBryde Wilcox. 

Edward Pinson McLennan Barbour. 

Benjamin Baldwin Meriwether Montgomery. 

Abram Hill Mitchell Lee. 

Isaac Lenoir Moore Montgomery. 

Merrill Hastings Moore Montgomery. 

Alexander Jackson Moseley Bullock. 

William Boyd McGehee Montgomery. 

William Louis Noll Tennessee. 

Carlyle Nisbet Georgia. 

James Cochran Phelps Lee. 

James Blackmon Powell Bullock. 

Shepherd Harrison Roberts Montgomery. 

Oscar Menderson Schloss Morgan. 

Wilbur Allen Sellers Bullock. 

Henry Alexander Skeggs (c) Morgan. 

John Hunt Skeggs Morgan. 

Matthew Scott Sloan , Mobile. 

Holland McTyeire Smith RusselL 

Godfrey Rhodes Thomas Sumter. 

Earnest Walter Thompson . . % Lee. 

Manly Curry Turpin Virginia. 

Henry Edward Werner Texas. 

Leonidas Whorton Cherokee. 

Gaius Whitfield : Marengo. - 

Jere Crawford Williams Lowndes. 

Edward Houston Wills . . . . .^. . . . Lee. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Oliver Hannibal Alford Marshall. 

Samuel Pitts Anderson . . . s Russell. 

William Warren Askew. .Georgia. 

Ralph Calloway Armstrong Lee. 

Albert Miner Avery Florida. 

Bennett Gordon Beck Georgia. 

(c) Conditioned. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 25 

Charles Homer Billingsley Elmore. 

Ellerslie Wallace Bullard Calhoun. 

Charles Cliffton Brown. . (c) Bibb. 

Clyde Allen Collins Hale. 

Oscar Cunningham Limestone. 

Gerald Matthews Crenshaw Perry. 

Pearco Henry DeBardleben Lee. 

Solon Malone Davis Georgia. 

Warren Alfred Dewees Tennessee. 

Paul Metzger Eichelberger Calhoun. 

Jesse Duncan Elliott Wyoming. , 

James Douglas Farley . . Dee. 

David Fleming Montgomery. 

John Sears Francis ..(c) Jefferson. 

Jeremiah Warren Gwinn Jefferson. 

William Houston Gwinn Jefferson. 

James Browcler Garber Hale. 

Clifton Duane Haynie Lee - 

William Tillman Heard Lee. 

Oscar Lynn Henry • • • - • Marshall. 

FrankHn Jerome Houston Jefferson. 

Garrett Newton Hudmon Lee. 

John Snow Jeraison ££"?* ' 

Albert Sidney Johnson • • Colbert 

Collins Johnson Missouri. 

James Taylor Jones ^T' 

Morris Ketchum * l °"™ ■ 

James Hartwell King. Colbert 

James Allen Kyser ^ lla8 - 

Earnest Linwood Maury . . . .' ; • • Jf octa w * 

Ross Earnest Mattison Calhoun. 

Roscins Sandwich McMichael ..(c) ®?° m £ 

Fern Wood Mitchell Etowah. 

Peter Preer Myhand ^ ee> . 

Henry Bigham Park Cjeorgia. 

William Marcus Peters L wndes 

Wallace Powers Pruitt • • • • ■ own es ' 

„ yf. (c) Conditioned. 






V 

26 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

Daniel Syers Eobertson Chambers. 

Edward Prescott Kutland . . . . (c) Lee. 

Charles Martin Shepard Mobile. 

Eichard Blount Shepard Mobile. 

Julian Cassius Smith Macon. 

Philip Ware Smith Calhoun. 

Alired Huntington Stevenson Mobile. 

Siddons Stollenwerck Marengo. 

Jonathan Eender Thomas Sumter. 

Abner Mason Torbert. Macon. 

Elijah Albert Turner Lee- 
George John Turner Florida. 

John Morgan Turner Lee 

Non Dura Ward .... (c) Tallapoosa. 

Clifford Noble Wallace . . Elmore. 

Mem Creagh Webb . . Marengo. 

Walker Dorr Willis . Florida. 

Forney Eenf ro Yarbrough Georgia. 

John Eyers Davis Yonge Florida. 

(c) Conditioned. 

SPECIAL AND IRREGULAR STUDENTS. 

• ■ ■ 

Abbreviations: Ph— Pharmacy ; E. & M. E— Electrical and Me- 
chanical Engineering; C— Chemistry ; Ag.— Agriculture; C. E — 
Civil Engineering ; M. A.— Mechanic Arts. 

James Wilson Bandy ph Lee. 

Milton Columbus Baldridge .... ph Madison. 

Arthur Bernard Beringjer Barbour. 

Peter Alexander Brannon ph . Bussell. 

Charles William Brassfield . . , . . ph Marengo. 

Charles Louis Bragaw ph Lee. 

Mortimer Perry Brown Pike. 

Walter Leslie Bryant ph . . . Georgia. 

Bufus White Butler ph Lee. 

William James Cameron Jefferson. 

Charles Newton Carraway ph. .... . .Montgomery. 

Edwin Weaver Caro m. a Florida. 

William Cruse Coles Calhoun. 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 27 

Harris Hill Cory Autauga. 

Eamon Eraso E. & M. E . . Venezuela. 

William Bullock Fleming Montgomery. 

Harry Lavan Fitch Wilcox. 

John Knox Franklin Bullock. 

Loren Gary Barbour. 

Swoope Darrow Gilbert E. & M. E . . Lauderdale. 

James McAnelly Gill .Madison. 

Frank Crouch Green E. & m. e. . Georgia. 

William Hope Haigler Montgomery. 

Eula Belle Hale Lee. 

John Dabney Hamilton . . ph ... Marion. 

John Albert Hannah ph Florida. 

Ethel Tilman Heard. Lee. 

Bunn Young Hill Georgia. 

John William Jepson .E. & m. e. . South Carolina. 

Walter Eldridge Johnson Lee. 

William Francis Johnston Calhoun. 

John Alexander Lanford ph Sumter. 

Robert Paterson Manly e. & M. E . . Georgia. 

George Mathews Marks Montgomery. 

James Philip Martin , Lee. 

Andrew McCord • • Lee. 

Graham Merchant. E. & M. E. .Lee, 

Louie Huntington Moore Montgomery. 

James Crowder Moore -. Lee. 

Llewellyn Perry Motley • Lee. 

Eobley Charles Munger Jefferson. 

James William Patton Chilton. 

Emile Thomas Peddy m. a Lee. 

Morris Pelham m. a Calhoun. 

James Garnett Pruitt ph Barbour. 

Marv Eobins Sampey • • • • J° n u e ° uh ' 

Howard Culver Eush m. a Mobile. 

Peter Sequeira * a Nicaragua,C. A. 

Lewe Frank Sessions Bullock. 

Maurice Garbery Shannon C Jefferson. 



28 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

Sidney Ewing Simpson E. & M. E. .Montgomery. 

Walter Ellis Sistrunk PH Elmore. 

Henry Bennett Thompson PH Lee. 

Elijah Smith Weldon. Elmore. 

Charles Finley White Jefferson. 

William Dunbar Wills c Lee. 

SUB-FRESHMAN CLASS. 

John Mangum Buchanan Lee. 

Cecil Battle Brown Pike. 

George Bobinson Bryant Baldwin. 

Walter Brooks Cawthorn Mobile. 

Walter Davis Compton Pike. 

Weedham Lee Drury .... Barbour. 

Jerry William Dumas .LeQ. 

James William Flanagan .Lee. 

Harrv Fannin Gohlson Pike. 

Bell George Hazard .Kentucky. 

Charles Henry Howie Calhoun. 

Bartow Elliott Ingram Russell. 

Emmett Llewllyn Jones Calhoun. 

Walter Henry Jones Pike. 

John Fulton Lanier Madison. 

Frank Runals McElhaney Lee. 

Frederick Clifton Maddox Georgia. 

Earnest Linwood Mayberry Lee. 

William Osborn Mitchell Lee. 

Edward LeBoy Napier Lee. 

Stanley Wimbish Napier Lee. 

Walter Cornelius Oneal Sumter. 

Walter Gardner Pitts Russell. 

James Robert Philips Calhoun. 

Joseph William Powers Madison. 

Albert Wellman Pratt Madison. 

James Henry Randle Bullock. 

Samuel Rembert Tennessee. 

Roy Gustavus Rhodes Marengo. 

George Washington Smith Lee, 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 29 

Nelson Horatio Romero Cuba. 

Sloss Smith Jefferson. 

Earnest Percy Thompson Lee. 

James Feagin Tompkins Lee. 

Filo Harrison Turner . Florida. 

Horace Sanford Turner Mobile. 

Fletcher Pcavey Whatley Montgomery. 

Forney Renfro Wright Lee. 

Samuel James Wisdom Montgomery. 

Summary. 

ift 
Graduates xo 

Senior Class i * u 

Junior Class 



.... • 



Sophomore Class <* 

Freshman Class u ") 

Special and Irregular Students .... 5 ' 

Total in College Classes .318 

Sub-Freshman Class ..... • 



• *•• .... 



Total...' .'... 356 

NUMBER OP STUDENTS IN EACH SUBJECT OP STUDY. 

English 5*6* Geolo *y : • 4 o 

History ..181 Civil Engineering « 

French b9 -E ,ectrical Engineering . . 47 

German ,-.'87 Mechanical Engineering. 45 

Latin. .:".'.'.".'.'.".'. 157 Biology..... ..18 

Mental Science 24 Drawing.. 174 

Political Economy 35 Mechanic Arts 219 

Mathematics 280 Military Tactics 301 

Chemistry 16 ° Mineralogy » 

Chemical Laboratory...- 73 Physical Laboratory 62 

Agriculture 1°8 Physiology 70 

Physics 13 * Veterinary Science a6 

*^ !*-S3S&:;::;:i:t.:S 



MMMMHM 



MILITARY ORGANIZATION, 



1 898-99. 



President, 
W. L. BROUN. 

Commandant, 
COL. B. S. PATRICK. 

Surgeon, . 
J. H. DRAKE. 

Battalion Staff. 
Cadet Captain I. F. McDonnkll, Assistant to Commandant. 
Cadet 1st Lieutenant T. G. Bush, Adjutant. 
Cadet 1st Lieutenant A. H. Feagin, Quartermaster. 
Cadet Sergeant H. P. Powell, Sergeant Major. 
Cadet Sergeant J. L. Burke, Sergeant Major. 
Cadet Sergeant J. W. Shuff, Quartermaster Sergeant. 

Cadet Captains. 

3. T. W. Wert, 

4. C. W. Minge. 
Cadet First Lieutenants, 

5. J. A Ward, 

6. B. E. Brown, 

7. D. Turner, 

8. W. 0. Scroggs. 
Cadet Second Lieutenants. 

2. J. S. Gilliland. 
Cadet First Sergeants. 

3. G. F. Boyd, 



1. I. F. McDonnell, 

2. J. F. Dobbin, 

1. B. Davis, 

2. J. M. Atkinson, 

3. A.M. Boyd, 

4. J. R. Peabody, 

1 H. A. Moon, 



I. E. H. Foy, 

2. F. ASHCRAPT, 



Cadet Sergeants. 



1. K. B. McKenzie, 

2. J.J. Flowers, 

3. R. P. Baldwin, 

4. J. P. Illges, 

5. A. C. Cameron, 

6. J. H. McGehee, 

7. R. B. Hall, (Color Sergeant), 

8. S. G. Forbes, 

9. M.F.Kahn, 



4. W. E. Kelley. 

10. J. W. Boyd, 

11. L. N. Duncan, 

12. J. S. Black, 

13. C.W.Nixon, 

14. W. L. Anderson, 

15. H, Ware, 

16. S. D. Gilbert, 

17. E. M. Mason. 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



31 



Cadet Corporals. 



1. J. D. Foy, 

2. S.H.Roberts, 

3. A. F Jackson, 

4. M. 8. Sloan, 

5. EH. Wills, 

6. A. C. Hannon, 

7. M. H. Moore, 

8. H. A. Skeggs, 

9 0. B. Andrews. 



10. G. Whitfield, 

11. A. H. Mitchell, 

12. W. B. McGehee, 

13. J. B. Powell, 

14. W. L. Greene, 

15. P. S. Haley, 

16. M. 0. Turpin, 

17. B. B. Merriwether. 



Cadet Band. 
M. Thos. Fcjllan, Chief Musican. 
A. M. Boyd, Principal Musician. 



J. A. Ward, 
C. L. Brag aw j 
W. A. Dewees, 
W. J. Cameron, 
F. C. Bivings, 
M. F. Kahn, 



> 



W. A. Frazer, 
J. A. Lanford, 
W. L. Bryant, 
E. H. Wills, 
M. D. Kahn, 
R. C. Armstrong. 



: 



J. O. Rush, Drum Major. 



r# 






^ 



32 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

KEQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

All applicants for admission should present testimo- 
nials of good moral character, and those who come from 
other colleges must present certificates of honorable 
dismissal. ■ • •# • 

To enter the freshman class the applicant must be not 
less than fifteen years of age, and should be qualified to 
pass a satisfactory examination on the following subjects : 

1. Geography, and History of the United States. 

2. English — (a) An examination upon sentences con- 
taining incorrect English, (b) A composition giving 
evidence of satisfactory proficiency in spelling, punctua- 
tion, grammar, and division into paragraphs. 

(a) Reading . The composition in 1899 will be upon 
subjects drawn from one or more of the following works 
in English Literature: (1) Hughes's Tom Brown at 
Rugby; \2) Southey's Life of Nelson ; (3) Shakespeare's 
Julius Cvesar; (4) Longfellow's Evangeline; (5) Scott^s 
Ivanhoe; (6) Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice; (7) 
Irving's Sketch Book; (8) Macaulay's Essay on Milton; 
(9) Scott's Marmion; (10) Dickens's David Copperfield. 

The candidate will be required to present evidence of 
a general knowledge of the subject matter, and to answer 
simple questions on the lives of the authors. This part 
of the examination is intended to test only a general 
knowledge of the substance of the books. 

(b) Study and Practice. This part of the examination 
presupposes the thorough study of the style of the work, 
and will be upon Julius Ccesar and the Essay on Milton. 

Preparation and examination on these works will be neces- 
sary before the student is classed as regular in any course. 

3. Mathematics — (a) Arithmetic, including funda- 
mental operations ; common and decimal fractions • 




mtm 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 33 

denominate numbers ; the metric system ; percentage, 
including interest and discount ; proportion ; extraction 
of square and cube roots, (b) Algebra to quadratic 
equations, one book of geometry. 

4. Those applicants who desire to continue the study 
of Latin should be qualified to pass a satisfactory exam- 
ination in Latin grammar and the first two books of 
Csesar, in addition to the above subjects. 

In pronouncing Latin it is recommended that « be pronounced as in 
father, a as the a in Cuba ; e as in prey, I as in men; l as in machine, i 
as in cigar ; o as in old, 6 as in obey; i as in rule, u as in full ; j as y in 
yard ; c always as'fc in king ; g always as g in get. 

For admission to the higher classes, students should 
be prepared to stand a satisfactory examination in all 
of the studies of the lower classes, as shown in the 
courses of study. Where opportunity has not been 
offered to pursue special studies required at this College, 
the system of equivalents will be adopted, and studies 
which denote an equivalent amount of discipline and 
training will be accepted as satisfactory. But if not 
prepared to pass an examination in history and chem- 
istry at the time of application, the applicant will be 
required before graduation to pass a satisfactory exam- 
ination on those subjects. 

ADMISSION ON CERTIFICATE 

Applicants will be admitted without examination on presenting a 
certificate from any of the certificate schools named herein 

The following educational institutions having made application to 
be correlated to this College and having presented an approved 
course of study, are hereby declared to be certificate schools, and 
are granted the privilege set forth in the following: 

-Students from certificate schools will be admitted to the freshman 
-class without examination upon the certificate of the president _or 
-principal showing definitely that such students have 'completed satis- 
factorily all the studies required for admission, as stated in the cata- 
'logue, and are otherwise admissible." 

The privilege of admitting students to the Sophomore class on 






— -^ 



34 » Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

certificate will be granted only to those approved schools that have 
had a continuous existence for five years or more, and have previ- 
ously had pupils admitted to that class without conditions. 
The following form of Certificate will be used : 

I hereby certify that A , B has attended the 

(name the school or academy) for years and has studied 

the following subjects: 

n History (name the books) 

nEnglish... ( " '■ . " ) 

n Algebra (state amount accomplished) 

n Geometry ( " " ** ) 

n Latin (stale books read) 

and having passed a satisfactory examination on these subjects as 

required in the Catalogue for admission to the class, 

I recommend him for the same. 

CERTIFICATE SCHOOLS. 

University Military School, Mobile J D. Wright. 

Verner Military Institute, Tuscaloosa W. H. Verner. 

University School, Montgomery J. M. Starke. 

Mt. Willing High School, Mt. Willing J. D. Garrett. 

State Normal School, Jacksonville. . . J. Forney. 

Male Academy, Huntsville '. Puryear,& Wyatt. 

State Normal College, Florence M. C. Wilson . 

Furman Academy, Livington .L. A. Cockrell. 

High School, O^elika J. M. Smallwood. 

Union Springs Institute J. B. Murphy. 

University Military School, Clanton E Y. McMorries. 

N. A. Agricultural School, Athens M. K Clements. 

W. Ala. Agricultural School, Hamilton.. S. T. Slaton. 

Eutaw Male Academy, Eutaw H . C . Horton 

Boys' High School, Anniston H. C. Gunnels. 

Taylors' School, Birmingham W. P. Taylor. 

Gaylesville High School John L. Ray. 

Carrollton Academy .L. V. Rosser. 

Ninth District Agricultural School,Blountsville.W. J. Beeson 

Gadsden High School I. \y\ Hill. 

Boyd High School, Ramer B. H. Boyd 

Dadeville High School A. W. Holstun and 

J. D. Lane. 

Eufaula High School f. L. McCoy. 

Union Springs College J. m. Sanders. 

Montgomery High School Q.JL. Floyd 

Calera Academy ; .' . Slaton . 




M 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 35 

ADMISSION OF YOUNG WOMEN. 

The privileged becoming students in this College is 
granted by the Trustees to young women of mature mind 
and character, on the following conditions : 

The applicant must be eighteen years of age, and if a 
candidate for a degree, be able to pass a satisfactory ex- 
amination in each of the four subjects as named below. 

If the applicant is a candidate for admission as a 
special or irregular student, she. must be able to pass a 
satisfactory examination in two of the subjects named. 

(a) In English— Proficiency in 'spelling and punctuation ; Gram- 
mar (Lockwood-Whitney) ; Rhetoric (Lockwood's Lessons and Gen- 
ung's Outlines of Rhetoric); Scudder's Masterpieces of American 
Literature ; Syle's From Milton to Tennyson. 
For requirements in reading in literature see page 32. 

(b) In History— Macy's Our Government ; Chambers's History 
of the United States; Myers's General History. 

(c) In Mathematics— Arithmetic ; Algebra, including quadratic 
equations, logarithms and series; Plane and Solid Geometry ; Plane 
and Analytic Trigonometry, as in Wentworth. 

(d) In Latin— Grammar, including the forms and syntax ; Jones's 
Latin Prose Composition; translation of selections from Caesar 
Nepos, Virgil, Cicero's Orations, Cicero's Letters, or the equivalent. 

The 'equivalents, of these subjects, as in above text-books may be substi- 
tuted. 

Botany will constitute a required part of the general course for 
young women who are candidates for a degree. 

When admitted, upon complying with the conditions above stated, 
they may enter upon the study of any subject taught in the College 
and join any class, for which, upon examination, they may be found, 
qualified. The only condition imposed will be that they engage in 
earnest study, and attend the exercises regularly. They will board in 
the town with private families and attend college only at the hours 

of their exercises. 

The Trustees authorize the Faculty to admit a candidate for a 
degree at the age of seventeen, provided she is able to comply with 
all the requirements for admission in the four subjects named and 
the application meets with its approval. 



36 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS. 

Entrance examinations will be held on Wednesday, 
the 13th of September, the day on which the session 
opens. Candidates will also be examined during the 
session, when application is made for admission. 

Applicants who are not prepared to stand the entrance 
examinations for full admission to the freshman class 
are admitted to the sub-college department. 

They will be advanced to full admission to the Fresh- 
man class when they are qualified to pass satisfactorily 
the required examinations. 

Students, upon their arrival at Auburn, will report immediately 
to the President. No student will be admitted to a recitation in any 
class previous to matriculation. 

NUMBER OF EXERCISES REQUIRED. 

Ali students are required to have not less than fifteen recitations 
per week, or their equivalent, in addition to the exercises in labora- 
tory work, drawing, and military drill. These additional exercises 
occupy not less than twelve hours per week, and in all give twenty- 
seven to thirty hours per week required in college exercises. 

Special and Irregular Students. 

The privilege of electing studies in the lower classes 
is not granted to young students nor to their parents. 
The Faculty will assign a student, on admission, to that 
class of a prescribed course for which he is qualified; 
and for special reasons, approved by the Faculty, he 
may be permitted to become irregular. 

Students qualified to prosecute the studies of the 
junio:- class, and those over twenty-one years of age that 
are not candidates for a degree, are permitted to take, 
with the advice of the Faculty, the subjects of study for 
which they may be qualified . 

A student who does not take all the studies in a class of one of the 
degree courses as prescribed in the catalogue, and is permitted to 
take an irregular course, will be assigned to a member of the Faculty, 




Alabama Polytechnic Instittjte. 37 

who will act as his special adviser, and when his course of study has 
been approved by the Faculty no other change will be permitted 
without the endorsement of his adviser. 

Regular students who fail to pass satisfactory final examinations 
in any one study become special students. They will be classed as 
regular students pursuing a course for a degree, whenever they can 
pass the examinations in those subjects in which they were found 

deficient. 

Students, candidates for a degree, who are not in full standing in 
all the prescribed studies of a class, rank in the military department 
with that class in which they have the greatest number of studies, 
and their names are so placed in the catalogue. 

ADMISSION TO HIGHER CLASSES. 

At the beginning of each term a student in the sub-freshman class 
may, on application approved by the Faculty, be examined for admis- 
sion to the freshman class in history. English, mathematics, or Latin, 
and if his examination is satisfactory in any subject, he will be ad- 
mitted to the freshman class in that subject only. 

indents who have completed satisfactorily all the studies of the 
sophomore class, as prescribed in. the catalogue, in any one of the reg- 
ular degree courses, can enter, without condition, the junior class in 
any course, except in the general course, or the course in pharmacy, 

in which Latin is required. tL**** 

Students who are admitted to the junior class from other institu- 
tions, on examination in English, Latin, and mathematics, and who 
have not completed all the studies of the sophomore class, in ordei to 
graduate, will be required to complete the course in chemistry and 
history as taught in the sophomore class. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

The courses of study include the Physical, Chemical, 
and Natural Sciences, with their applications ; Agricul- 
ture ; Biology ; Mechanics, Astronomy, Mathematics ; 
Drawing ; Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical Engineer- 
ing; Physiology and Veterinary Science; Pharmacy; 
English, French, German, and Latin languages ; History, 
Political Economy ; Mental and Moral Sciences. 

These studies are arranged in regular courses so as to 
offer a liberal and practical education as a preparation 
for the active pursuits of life. 

There are five degree courses for undergraduates, each 



mmmm 



38 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



% 



loading to the degree of Bachelor of Science, (B. Sc.) 
and requiring four years for its completion. 

I. Course in Chemistry and Agriculture. 
II. Course in Civil Engineering. 
111. Course in Electrical and Mechanical En- 
gineering. 

IV. General Course. 
V. Course in Pharmacy. 

There are also two partial courses, each requiring two 
years for its completion : 

VI. Two-Year Course in Agriculture. 
VII. Two-Year Course in Mechanic Arts. 

Course I includes theoretical and practical instruction 
in those branches that relate to chemistry and agricul- 
ture, and is especially adapted to those who propose to 
devote themselves to agriculture or chemical pursuits. 

Course II includes the principles and applications of 
the sciences that directly relate to civil engineering, and 
is adapted to those who expect to enter that profession. 

Course III includes, besides the general principles and 
applications of the sciences, a special course in the ap- 
plications of electricity and mechanics, and is arranged 
for the profession of electrical and mechanical en- 
gineering. 

Course IV has been arranged to give a general and 
less technical education in subjects of science and Ian- 
guage to meet the wants of those students who have 
selected no definite vocation in life, as well as of those 
who propose ultimately to engage in teaching or in some 
commercial or professional business. 

Course V includes, besides the general education of 
course IV in the lower classes, a special course in phar- 
macy and chemistry, and is adapted to those who expect 
to become pharmacists, manufacturing chemists, or to 
enter upon the study of medicine. 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 39 

Courses VI and VII have been arranged for the benefit 
of those students who, for reasons satisfactory to them- 
selves, are unable to continue at college four years and 
to take one of the regular degree courses. 



A student who completes satisfactorily all the work of the senior 
class in a department, including the laboratory work, will be awarded 
a certificate of proficiency in said subject. 

Students who complete either of the two-year courses will, on pass- 
ing a satisfactory examination, receive certificates indicating their 

attainments. 

No degree or certificate of proficiency will be given in any course 
unless the applicant has passed a satisfactory examination in element- 
ary English. Every candidate for a degree will be required to stand 
this special examination during the second term of the Senior year. 

Declamation and themes or orations are required of all regular 
students pursuing courses leading to a degree. 

POST-GRADUATE COURSES. 

The post-graduate degrees are— Master of Science, 
Mining Engineer, Civil Engineer, Electrical and 
Mechanical Engineer and Pharmaceutical Chem- 
ist. 

A more extended post-graduate course of study may 
be taken by a graduate of this College or of any other 
institution'of equal grade. The completion of a course 
which leads to a post-graduate degree requires one year's 
residence at the College, spent in the satisfactory prose- 
cution of a course of study, with such laboratory work 
as may be approved by the Faculty. 

The candidate must also present to the Faculty a satisfactory thesis 
showing independent investigation upon some subject pertaining to 
his lourse, and must pass an examination at the close of each term 
on the course of study prescribed, in which he must attain a grade of 
75 per cent. The examination is written, and also oral in the pies- 

ence of the Faculty. jJu* #**« '■<■* 

The subject of the thesis must be submitted to the Faculty foi ap- 



2Q78£T 






m w 1 



ij 



40 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



proval prior to January 1st, and the thesis given to the professor by 
April 1st. 

Applicants for post-graduate degrees are subject to the general 
regulations as other students, but are exempt from all military duty. 

Resident graduates that are not candidates for a degree, are per- 
mitted to matriculate and prosecute the studies in any department 
of the College. 

The following courses are prescribed for the degrees named : 

Mining Engineer.— Students who have received the degree of B Sc. 
in engineering, civil, or electrical and mechanical, or who have prose- 
cuted an equivalent course of study, can enter upon a special course 
of mining engineering, which includes the following subjects of 
study : 

Industrial Chemistry, Analytic Chemistry, Assaying, Reduction of 
Ores, Mineralogy, Economic Geology, with practical work in the 
field, Mining Machinery with the applications of steam and elec- 
tricity to the various operations connected with the exploitation of 
mines 

The student, if a candidate for a degree, will also be required to 
prosecute the necessary studies in that course of engineering in which 
he has not graduated. k 

This course of study will be under the charge of the professors of 
geology, chemistry, civil, electrical and mechanical engineering. 

Civil Engineer — Civil Engineering, Mathematics, Analytical Me- 
chanics. 

Electrical and Mechanical Engineer.— -Electrical Engineering, Me- 
chanical Engineering. 

Pharmaceutical Chemist.— Pharmacy and Chemistry. 

Master of Science —Studies in three departments, in two of which 
the candidate must have previously completed the full course of the 
senior class ; or in special cases, with the approval of the Faculty, a 
student may devote his entire time to work in one department. 

A certificate of proficiency will bs given when any one subject of a 
post-graduate course is satisfactorily completed. 

SPKCIAL ONE-YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 

Young men over twenty-one years of age who desire to study agri- 
culture will be permitted, without examination, to enter any class 
under the professor of agriculture, and will be excused from reciting 
in any other class, from military duty, and from all other college 
duties; but will be under the general college regulations, and will be 
required to have their time fully occupied . 

They may attend the lectures in agriculture in all the classes and 
engage in the practical work at the experiment station, in the field, 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 41 

stock-yard, dairy, garden, orchard, vineyard, etc., and may thus, in 
one year, acquire valuable practical knowledge of scientific agricul- 
ture. 

PHOTOGRAPHY. 

During the session there will be given by Professor Mell a course 
of twelve lectures on photography. This course will be elective, and 
the instruction will be open to any student that may desire to learn 
how to make pictures. It will be necessary for each student to pro- 
vide himself with an outfit that will cost from $11.50 to $16.00. 

LABORATORY INSTRUCTION. 

Laboratory instruction constitutes an important feature 
in the courses of education provided for the students of 
this Institute, and as far as possible all students are re- 
quired to enter upon laboratory work in some one depart- 
ment. 

Laboratory instruction and practical work are given 

in the following departments : 

I. Chemistry. 

II. Civil Engineering, Field Work, Survey- 
ing, Etc. 

III. Agriculture. 

IV. Botany. 

V. Mineralogy. 

VI. Biology. 

VII. Technical Drawing. 

VIII. Mechanic Arts. 

IX. Physics. 

X. Electrical Engineering. 

XI. Mechanical Engineering. 

XII. Physiology and Veterinary Science. 

XIII. Pharmacy. 

NoTE.-Special work in English or History may be taken by stu- 
dents in the general course as a substitute for laboratory work. 

4 



42 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

GYMNASIUM AND ATHLETIC FIELD 1 . 

The gymnasium is situated at the west end of the ath- 
letic and drill grounds, and contains one room, 80x40 
feet, with strong beams above for fastening the usual 
fixtures. 

It is equipped with Spalding's gymnasium apparatus 

and is open to all students at stated hours, under the 
care of an officer. 

The athletic field has a quarter-mile cinder track and 
ample space for football, baseball, and general athletics. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The government of the College is administered by the President 
and Faculty, in accordance with the code of laws and regulations 
enacted by the Trustees. 

Attention to study and punctuality in attendance on recitations 
and all other duties, are required of every student. Students are 
prohibited from having in their possession arms or weapons not issued 
for the performance of military duty, and also from using, or causing 
to be brought into the college limits, intoxicating liquors. 

Students are not permitted to participate in any public entertain- 
ment, or game, without previously obtaining the consent of the 
, Faculty. 

No cadet will be permitted, without the approval of his parent or 
guardian, to take part in a public game of football ; nor will permis- 
sion be given for any athletic game, to a student deficient in his stu- 
dies. 

MILITARY DRILL. 

There are three regular military drills each week, and all under- 
graduate students, not physically incapacitated to bear arms, are 
required to engage in these exercises ; privates of the Senior class are 
exempt. 

The drills are short, and the duty involves no hardships. The mili- 
tary drill is a health-giving exercise, and its good effects in thedevel- 
opment of the physique and improvement of the carriage of the cadet 
are manifest. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICES. 
Religious services are held every morning in the chapel. 
All students are required to attend these exercises, and also to at- 
tend the church of their choice at least once on Sunday. 

Opportunities are also offered for attending Bible classes every 
Sunday. J 




I 



4 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



43 



YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

This Association is regularly organized and has a well furnished 
room on the first floor of the main building set apart for its exclusive 
use. Through its weekly meetings it exerts a wholesome Christian 
influence among the students. 

Students are advised to unite with the Association when they enter 

the Institute. 

The ladies of the different churches in Auburn, have recently 
formed an Auxiliary association to the Y. M. C. A. of this Institute 
Assisted by members of the Faculty, they will hold monthly a joint 
service of praise in the College chapel and will provide special lec- 
turers for the occasion. 

Tht-y have also undertaken to build a special hall for the use of the 
Association, and will solicit subscriptions for that purpose. 
The following are the officers : 

J. M.Atkinson, President. 

Chas. White, Vice-President. 

A. F. Jackson, Treasurer. 

J. R. Rutland, Corresponding Secretary. 

H.H. Cory, Recording Secretary. 

M. A. Beeson, Librarian. 

LOCATION. 

The Institute is situated in the town of Auburn, fifty-nine miles 
east of Montgomery, on the line of the Western Railroad. 

The region is high and healthful, noted for its general good health 
and freedom from malaria, having an elevation of eight hundred and 
twenty-six feet above tide water. By statute of the State, the sale of 
spirituous liquors aud keeping saloons of any kind are forbidden. 

BOARDING. 

The Institute has no barracks or dormitories, and the students 
board with families in the town of Auburn, and thus enjoy all the pro- 
tecting and beneficial influence of the family circle. 



i 






44 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

I .—COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 



/ 



The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 
First Term. Second Term. 

5. English. 5. English. 

2. History. 2. History. 

5. Mathematics. ■» 5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics.** 3. Elementary Physics^z^igriculture. 
3. Drawing. 3. Di-awing. 3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y . 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y 



Third Term. 
5. English. 
3. History. 
5 jJ^Tathematics . 



3. Military Drill. 



3. Military Drill. 



\ 







^ 



*#! 



3. Military Drill. 
SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Second Term. 
3. English. 
3. Histoixy^* 
5. MathSnatlcs. 
3. General Chemistry. 

2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 

2. Physiology. 
6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

Chemical Lab'y. 2. Chemical Lab'y. 2. Chemical Lab'y, 

3. Military Drill. 
JUNIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 
3. English. 

3. Physics. 
3. Industrial Chemistry. 3. Industrial Chemistry. 3. Industrial Chemistry 
2. Agriculture. 2. Agriculture. 2. Agriculture (b). 

4. Botany (Lab'y). 

1. Military Tactics. 
9. Chemical Lab'y. 

2. Veterinary Science. 

2. Clinical Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 
SENIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 
2. Political Economy (c;.2. Political Economy. 
2. Mental Science (d). 2. Mental.Science (d). 
2. Astronomy. 2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 2 . Geology. 

5. Biology. 5. Biology 
2. Agricultural Ch'm'try 2. Agricultural Ch'm'try.2. Agricultural Oh'm'try. 

1. Military Science. I. Military Science. 2. Military Science. 
9. Chemical Lab'y. 9. Chemical Lab'y. 9. (Jhemical Lab'y. 

2. Vetermary Science. 1. Veterinary Science. 2. Veterinary Science 
2. Clinical L ab'y. ^imcjdLab'y. 2 . Clinical Lab'y. 



First Term. 

3. English. 

3. History. 

5. MathemaWes. 
->3. General Chemistry. 
^ 2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 
^> 2. Physiology. 



3. Military Drill. 

First Term. 
3. English. 
3. Physics. 



— *4. Botany (Lab'y). 
1. Military Tactics. 
9. Chemical Lab'y. 



3. Military Drill. 

First Term. 
2. English Literature. 
2. Mental Science (d). 
2. Physics. 
2. Geology. 
5. Biology. 



Third Term. 
3. English. 
3. Botaaxia). 

Mathematics 
3. General Chemistry . 

2. Agriculture (b). 

3. Drawing. 
2. Physiology. 



3. Military Drill, 

Third Term. 
3. English. 
3. Physics. 



4. Botany (Lab'y). 

1. Military Tactics. 
9. Chemical Lab'y. 

2. Veterinary Science. 

2. Clinical Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 

Third Term. 



(a) Begins March 1st. 
(c) Begins Feb. 15th. 



<*}) Also Practical Agriculture, 
(a) German may be substituted. 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



45 



II. —COURSE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Second Term. Third Term. 

5. English. 5. English. 

2. History. 3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 3. Elementary Physics. 2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 



First Term. 
5. English. 
2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



3. Military Drill. 

First Term. 
3. English. 
3. History. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 
2. Agriculture (b). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing 



3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 
3. English. 
3. Botany (a). 
5. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 
2. Agriculture (b). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 



3. Military Drill. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Second Term. 
3. English. 
3. History. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 
2. Agriculture (b). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 
6. Mechanic Art»Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

2. Chemical Lab'y. 2. Chemical Lab'y. 2. Chemical Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 
First Term. Second Term. Third Term. 

3. English, French, or 3. English, French, or 3. English, French, or 

German. German. German. 

3. Physics. 3. Physics. 3. Physics. 

5. Mathematics. 5. Mathematics. 5. Mathematics. 

5. Civil Engineering. 5. Civil Engineering. 5. Civil Engineering. 

5. Drawing. 5. Drawing. 5. Drawing. 

1. Military Tactics . 1. Military Tactics . 1. Military Tactics . 

6. Lab'y, Mech. Arts (c). 6. Lab'y, Mech. Arts (c). 6. Lab'y, Mech. Arts (c). 

1. Field Work, Erfgin'g. 2. Field Work, Engin'g. 2. Field Work,Engin'g. 
3. Military Drill . 3. Military Drill . 8, Military Drill. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

First Term. Second Term. Third Term. 

2. English Literature(d).2. Political Economy (d). 2. Political Economy (d). 
2. Physics. 2. Astronomy. 2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 2. Geology. 2. Geology. 

3. Mathematics 3. Mathematics . 



3. Mathematics. 



(a) Begins March 1st. _„ . 1T . 

(b) For Agriculture may be substituted Physical Laboratory . 

(?) SoXS Litfand Pol. Econ, may be substituted French or German, 



v< 



46 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



5. Civil Engineering. 5. Civil Engineering. 5. Civil Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 5. Drawing. 5. Drawing. 

1. Military Science 1. Military Science. 1. Military Science. 

4. Mech. Eng., Lab'y. 4. Mech. Eng., Lab'y. 4. Mech. Eng., Lab'y. 
Field Work, Engin'g. Field Work, Engin'g. Field Work, Engin'g. 



III.— COURSE IN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL 

ENGINEERING. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 
In freshman and sophomore classes the same studies are prescribed as 
in Course II in Civil Engineering. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 
Second Term. 



First Term. 

3. English, French, or 
German . 

3. Physics. 

5. Mathematics. 

4. Electrical Engin'g. 
3. Mech. Engineering 



3. English, French, or 
German . 

3. Physics. 

5. Mathematics. 

4. Electrical Engin'g 



Third Term . 

3. English, French, or 
German . 

3. Physics 

5. Mathematics. 

4. Electrical Engin'g 
3. Mech. Engineering. 



3. Mech. Engineering 
4. Mechanical Drawing. 4. Mechanical Drawing. 4. Mechanical Drawing 
4. Electrical Lab'y. 4. Electrical Lab'y. 4. Electrical Lab'y 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 

1. Military Tactics. 

3. Military Drill. 



6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
1. Military Tactics. 
3. Military Drill. 



6. Mech . Art Lab'y 
1. Military Tactics. 
3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

2. Eng. Literature (a). 
2. Physics. 

2. Geology. 

3. Mathematics. 

5. Electrical Engin'g. 

5. Mech. Engineering. 
2. Electrical Designing. 

6. Electrical Lab' v. 



SENIOR CLASS. 
Second Term. 



Third, Term . 



2. Political Economy (a). 2. Political Economy (a). 

2. Astronomy. 2. Astronomy, 

3. Mathematics. 3. Mathematics. 

I' ^ leC u tn i al ?ngin'g. 5 - Electrical Engin'g 

5. Mech Engineering. 5. Mech. Engineering. 

2. E ectrica Designing 2. Electrical Designing. 

?' £ lec , tr, ?. al Lttb y 6 - Electrical Lab'v. 



4. Mech. Eng Lab'y. 4. Mech Eng Lal'y. 4 Mech C Lab^ 
LMih tary Science. 1. Military Sci ence/ 1. Mm^loi^' 



(a) French or German may be substituted. 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



47 



IV.— GENERAL COURSE. 



The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the numbers of hours per week. 



First Term. 
3, English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



First Term.. 
5. Latin. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mech Art Lab'y. 

2. Chemical Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 

First Term. 

3. English. 

3. Physics. 

3. Mathematics. 

3. French. 

3. German. 

3. Latin. 

1. Military Tactics. 

6. Lab'y Work (b). 

3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

2. English Literature. 
2. Mental Science. 
2. Physics. 

2. Geology. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1 Military Science. 
6 Lab'y Work (b). 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Second Term. 
3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Second Term. 
5. Latin. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 

2. Chemical Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 
Second Term. 

3. English. 

3. Physics, 

3. Mathematics. 

3. French. 

3. German. 

3. Latin. 

1. Military Tactics. 

6. Lab'y Work (b). 

3. Military Drill. 

>" SENIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 



Third Term. 
• 3. English. 
3. History. 
3. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 
3. Drawing. 

2. Agriculture. 

6. Mechanic Arts. 

3. Military Drill. 

Third Term. 
5. Latin. 
3. Botany (a). 

5. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 

2. Chemical Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 

Third Term. 

3.. English. 

3. Physics. 

3. Mathematics. 

3. French. 

3. German. 

3. Latin. 

1 . Military Tactics. 

6. Lab'y Work (b). 

3, Military Drill. 

Third Term. 



2. Political Economy (c).2. Political Economy. 



2. Mental Science. 
2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2 Latin. 

1. Military Science. 
6. Lab'y Work (b). 



2. Mental Science. 
2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1. Military Science. 
6. Lab'y Work(b). 



(a) Begins March 1st. . ■ ., , - ,. , 

(b) The student may elect the laboratory of any department for which 

he may be qualified. 

(c) Begins February 15th. 



48 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



V.— COURSE IN PHARMACY. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week 



First Term. 
3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 
5. Latin. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

8. General Chemistry. 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 

2. Chemical Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 

First Term. 

3. Physics. ' 

6. Chemical Lab'y. 

4. botanical Lab'y. 
3. Pharmacy. 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Second Term. 
3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art. Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Second Term. 
5. Latin. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 

2. Chemical Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 

JUNIOR CLA8S. 

Second Term. 

3. Physics. 

6. Chemical Lab'y. 

4. botanical Lab'y. 



Third Term . 
3. English. 
3. History. 
3. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 
3. Drawing. 

2. Agriculture. 

6. Mechanic Arts. 

3. Military Drill. 

Third Term . 
5. Latin. 
3. Botany, (a) 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 

2. Chemical Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 

Third Term. 

3. Physics. 

6. Chemical Lab'y. 

4. Botanical Lab'y. 
3. Pharmacy. 



3. Pharmacy. 
9. Pharmaceutical Lab. 9. Pharmaceutical Lab. 9. Pharmaceutical Lab 
4. Pharmacognosy. 4. Pharmacognosy. 4. Pharmacognosy. 

1. Military Tactics. 

3. Military Drill. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 

5. Biology. 

6. Chemical Lab'y. 

4. Pharmacy. 
9. Pharmaceutical Lab. 9. Pharmaceutical Lab. 9. Phw^^ticd Lab 
4. Pharmacognosy. 4. Pharmacognosy. 4. Pharmacognosy 
1. Military Science. 1. Military Science. 1. Military Science 

3 - Materia Medica. 3. Bacteriology. 



1. Military Tactics. 

3. Military Drill. 

First Term. 
5. Biology. 
7. Toxicology. 

4. Pharmacy. 



1. Military Tactics. 

3. Military Drill. 

Third Term. 

5. Biology. 

6. Chemical Lab'y. 

4. Pharmacy. 



8. Materia Medica. 



(a) Begins March 1st. 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 
VI— TWO-YEAR COURSE IN MECHANIC ARTS. 



49 



First Term. 
5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics, 

3. Elementary Physics. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

First Term. 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 
3. Drawing. 

12. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



FIRST YEAR. 
Second Term. 
5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

SECOND YEAR. 
Second Term. 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 
5. Drawing. 

12. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

5. English. 
3. History. 
5; Mathematice. 

2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill, 

Third Term. 

3. English. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Physics. 

3. Drawing. 

12. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 



VII— TWO-YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 



First Term. 
5. English. 
2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



FIRST YEAR. 

Second Term. 
5. English. 
2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



Third Term. 
5. English. 
3. History. 
5. ^Mathematics. 



5. Mathematics. o. juatiicuiau^. ^-— 

3 Elementary Physics^. Elementary Physicsr*2 Agriculture. 

3 Drawing 3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

4 : Mechanic Art Lab'y. 4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 4. Mechanic Art LaVy. 

3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3 Military Drill. 

2. Practical Agricult're. 2. Practical Agricult're. 2. Practical Agncult re. 

SECOND YEAR. 
First Term. Second Term. 

3. English. 3. English. 

5. Mathematics. 5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 3. General Chemistry. 3. Genera Chemistry, 

4. Agriculture. 4. Agriculture. 4 Agriculture. 
2 Physiology 2. Physiology. 2. Physiology 

2*. Veterinary Science. 2. Veterinary Science. 2. Veterinary Science 
12. Practical Agricult're.12. Practical Agricult're.12. Practical Agncult re. 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3- Military Drill, 



Third Term. 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 



SCHEDULE OF EXERCISES. 



Or 



HOURS 


MONDAY 


TUESDAY 


WKDXESDAY 


THURSDAY 


FRIDAY 


SATURDAY 




- 


3. Physiology. 








- 


I. 


4. Algebra. 


4. Geometry. 


4. Algebra. 


4. Geometry. 


4. Algebra. 






3. Latin . 


3. Latin. 


3. Latin. 


3. Latin. 


3. Latin. 




8-9 




2. German. 




2. German. 




Exercises in Elocuti'n. 




1. and 2 Drawing. 


1 and 2 Drawing. 


1 and 2 Drawing 


1 and 2 Drawing. 


1 and 2 Drawing. 






1. Elec Engine Vg. 


2. Botany. 


1. Vet. Science. 


2. Botany. 


1. Veternary Sci. 






2. Mec.EngineVg. 


1. ElecEngineVg 


l.Elec EngineVg. 


1. Mental Science 


1. Elec Engine'r'g 






1. Biology. 


2. Mec.EngineVg 


1. German. 


1. Elec Engine'r'g. 


1. German. 






1. German . 


1. Mental Science. 












4. English. 


4 History. 


4. English. 


4. History. 


4. English 




II. 


3. Chemistry. 


3. Agriculture. 


3. Chemistry. 


3. Agriculture. 


3. Chemistry. 


Military Drill. 




2. Civ. Engineer'g. 


2. Civ. Engineer'g. 


2. Civ. Engineer'g. 


2. Civ. Engine'r'g. 


2. Civ. Engine'r'g 




9-10 


2. Latin . 


2. Botany. 


2. Latin. 


2 Botany. 


2. Latin. 






1. Calculus. 


1. Physics. 


1. Calculus. 


1. Physics. 








1. Biology. 


2. ElecEngineVg 


2. Vet. Science. 


2. Elec Engine'r'g 


1. Calculus: 






2 ElecEngineVg 




2. Elec EngineVg 




2. Mech. Engin'r'g 
2. Vet. Science. 




III. 


3. English. 


3. History (1,2). 


3. English. 


3. History (1, 2). 


3. English. 


Mechanic Arts. 




2. Physics. 


3. Botany (2, 3). 




3 Botany (2,3). 


2. Physics. 


Chemical Laboratory. 






1. Biology. 


2. Physics. 


1. Civ. Engine'r'g 




Electric Laboratory. 


10-11 


1. Civ. Engine'r'g 


1. Civ. Engineer'g 


i. Latin. 


4. English. 


1. Civ. Engineer'g. 


Physical Laboratory. 




1. Biology. 


4. English. 


1. Civ Engineer'g. 


1. Mech Engin'r'g 




Veterinary Clinics. 




1. Latin. 


1. Mec.EngineVg 


1. Biology. 


2. French. 


4. History. (3). 


Biological Laboratory. 




1. Mec.EngineVg. 


2. French. 

2. Mec. Drawing. 


1. Mech.Engin'r'g. 




1. Mech. Engin'r'g 


Field Engineering. 



> 



o 
f 

H 

m 



SCHEDULE OF EXERCISES— Continued. 



HOURS 


MONDAY 


TUESDAY 


WEDNESDAY 


THURSDAY 


FRIDAY 


SATURDAY 


IV. 

11-12 


4. Physics (1,2). 

4. Agriculture (3). 
4. Latin (1, 2). 

3. Drawing. 

2. Mathematics. 
2. Chemistry. 
I.English (1,2) 
J. Pol. Econ.(2,3). 

4. Mechanic Arts. 


4. Latin. 
3. Drawing. 

2. Agriculture. 
2. Mathematics. 
1. Chemistry. 
1. French. 


4. Physics (1, 2). 

4. Latin (3). 

3. History (1,2). 

3. Botany (2, 3). 
2. Mathematics. 
2. Chemistry. 

I. English (1,2;. 
1. Political Econ- 
omy (2,3). 

4. Mechanic Arts 


4. Latin. 

2. Agriculture. 

2. Mathematics . 
1. Chen istry 

3. Physiology. 
1 . French . 


4. Physics (1,2). 

4. Agriculture (3). 
4. Latin (1,2;. 
3. Drawing. 
2. Mathematics. 
2. Chemistry 

1. MilitaryScience 
4 Mechanic Arts 


3. Mechanic Arts. 
Chemical Laboratory. 
Electrical Laboratory. 
Physical Laboratory . 
Veterinary Clinics. 
Biological Laboratory. 
Field Engineering. 


V. 
12-1 


4. Drawing. 

3. Mathematics. 
2. English. 

4. Mechanic Arts. 
1. Elec. Designi'g. 
1. French. 


3. Mathematics. 
2. English. 
1. Geology. 


4. Drawing 

3. Mathematics. 

4. Mechanic Arts. 

2. German 

1. Elec Designing 

2 Anal Chemist'y. 


3. Mathematics. 
2. English. 
1. Geology. 


4. Drawing. 

3. Mathematics. 

4. Mechanic Arts. 

1. Elec. Designing. 

2. Milit'ry Tactics. 


3. Mechanic Arts. 
Chemical Laboratory. 
Electrical Laboratory. 
Physical Laboratory. 
Veterinary Clinics . 
Biological Laboratory. 
Field Engineering 


P.M. 

Y1,VII. 

2-4 


4. Mechanic Arts. 

3. FieldWork Agr. 
1 & 2 Laboratory 
Chemistry. 
1 & 2 Fit- Id Work. 
Engineering. 
l&2Mach Woik 
Elec. Lab. Work. 
Physical Labor'y. 


3. Mechanic Arts. 
2. Mineialogical 
Laboratory . 

Military Drill (*>. 

1. Mech.Lab'tory. 
Elec.Lab'y Work. 
1 and 2 History . 


4. Mechanic Arts 

3. FieldWork,Agr. 

1 & 2 Laboratory. 

Chem 

1 & 2 Field Work, 

Engineering. 

L &2Mach Work. 

Ex'cis. in Elocut'n 

Elec. Lab. Work. 

1 Physical Labor'y. 


3.. Mechanic Arts 
2. Mineralogical 
Laboratory . 

Military Drill (*) 

U Mech Labor'y . 
Elec.Lab'y Work 
L and History . 


4 Mechanic Arts. 

3. Field Wik Agr. 
2 French. 
1 & 2 Lab . Chem 
1 & 2 Field W'rk, 
Engineering 
1 &2Mach W'sk 
Ex'cis in Elocut'n 
Elr-c Lab Work. 
Physical Labor'y. 





Chapel services daily at 7 :45 a.m. 

lumbers prefixed denote classes — 1 denotes senior 

♦From 4:30 to 5:30 p. m. 



00 

a 



2 junior, etc. Numbers affixed— (1), (2), (3),— denote terms. 



©» 







/ I 



M M 







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION. 



PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY. 

PRESIDENT BROUN. 
PROFESSOR MCKISSICK. 

The instruction is given by recitations from text-books 
and lectures, illustrated by experiments. The first part 
of the course is occupied with elementary rational me- 
chanics, treated graphically. 

This is followed by a full discussion of molecular me- 
chanics ; while due prominence is given to principles, 
frequent reference is made 'to the applications of science. 

The studies of the junior class include the properties 
of matter, units of measure, force, work, energy, kine- 
matics, kinetics, mechanic powers, friction, pendulum, 
molecular forces of solids, liquids and gases, theory of 
undulations, heat, electricity, magnetism, etc.___- — 

The studies of the senior class include light, and 
astronomy. 

Post-graduate Course. This includes the study of ana- 
lytical mechanics, and requires a knowledge of differential 
and integral calculus. 

Text-Books . 

Atkinson's Ganot's Physics, Young's Astronomy, Berry's History of 
Astronomy, Bowser's Analytic Mechanics. 

PHYSICAL LABORATORY. 

Instructor H. H. Kyser. 

The laboratory work includes courses for the sophomore and fresh- 
man classes, and is so arranged as to begin with a study of the sys- 
tems and units of measurements and to conclude with simple experi- 
ments in heat. 




A 






Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



53 



The student is required to ascertain experimentally various physical 
laws hence in all exercises there is something to measure. From 
these measurements he is required to find the law connecting the 
quantities involved. Results of experiments are to be entered, in 
tabular form, together with methods, diagrams, etc., in a laboratory 
record-book, which each student is required to prepare. At the close 
of each week this book is criticised and graded according to its accu- 
racy and neatness. 

Freshman Course. 

First Term, (a) Elementary physics (mechanics and heat). 
Second Term. (6) Elementary graphical statics (continued in 

sophomore year). 
Third Term, (c) Systems and units of measurements. 
(d) Simple measurements of length, surface, volume and weight. 

Sophomore Course. 

First Term, (a) Simple measurements and designing verniers and 

micrometers. 

(b) Elementary graphical statics (c) Forces, moments and work 

Second Term . (d) Simple machines and friction (determining me- 
chanical advantages, lose, efficiency, law, etc). 

(e) Pendulum and gravity. (/) Elasticity. 

Third Term, (g) Liquids, (fc>> Density and specific gravity. (0 

Gases, (j) Heat. 
The laboratory is equipped with instruments of foreign and Ameri- 
can manufacture, *such as verniers, micrometers, cathetometers, a 
horizontal comparator, a Kater's reversion pendulum, balances, etc 
and with all apparatus necessary to perform from 10 to 20 experiment, 
under each of the above named groups. 



MATHEMATICS. 

PROFESSOR SMITH. 

The general course for the first two years embraces the 
first year, algebra, through logarithms, and geometry, six 
books ; second year, algebra, solid geometry, plane and 
spherical trigonometry, surveying, mensuration. 

Two objects are sought to be attained : first, mental 
discipline ; second, a thorough knowledge of the princi- 
ples of pure mathematics and their practical applications. 






I 



1 



yj 



54 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



Theoretical and practical instruction is given to the 
sophomore class in farm, town and government land sur- 
veying, dividing land, mapping, plotting, and computing 
areas, etc. ; also in the theory, adjustment and use of 
instruments. 

The class in sections of six or eight, devote three after- 
noons a week during the second and third terms to field 
practice. 

Mensuration includes an extended course in measure- 
ments of heights and distances, plane, rectilinear, and 
curvilinear figures, surfaces and volumes. 

The completion of this course, common to all students, 
lays the foundation for the pure and applied mathematics 
of the mechanical and engineering courses. Analytical 
geometry, descriptive geometry, and calculus are pur- 
sued in the mechanical and engineering courses. Espe- 
cial attention is given to their practical applications. 

During the entire course, instruction in text-books is 
supplemented by lectures. Solutions of original practi- 
cal problems are required of ^ the student, to make him 
familiar with the application of the principles and for- 
mulas. 

Text-Books. 
Wentvvorth's Algebra, Wenthworth's Geometry, Wentvvorth's Trie- 
onometry „nd Surveying, Wentvvorth's Analytical Geometry, Fan nce's 
Descriptive Geometry, xXicholson's Calculus, Johnson's Differential 
Equations, Osborne's problems, Peck's Determinants. 



GEOLOGY AND BOTANY. 

PROFESSOR MELL. 

Geology.— This subject is studied in the senior class 
and extends through the entire session. Special attention 
is given to the geology of Alabama, and many illustra- 
tions are drawn from the coal and iron fields and other 




\ 




BOTANICAL LABORATORY. 



mm m 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



55 



natural deposits of minerals in the State. Mineral 
springs, the origin of ore deposits, and the geological- 
relations of soils are carefully studied. 

There is also a course of advanced work in practical 
geology for post-graduate students . This subject is pur- 
sued by applicants for the degrees of master of science 
and mining engineer. 

The junior class in civil engineering studies mineral- 
ogy through the entire session. This work consists of a 
thorough course in blow-pipe analysis of the ordinary 
minerals, and lectures upon crystallography, with in- 
struction how to measure crystals and determine the 
physical constants of minerals. An effort is made to 
familiarize the student with all the economic ores and 
the rocks entering into the composition of soils. 

Botany —The students of the sophomore class begin 
the studv of botany the first of March, and continue it 
through'the session. Analytical work is made an im- 
portant feature . This class is provided with plants from 
the fields, and taught how to determine their specific 
names The work is sufficiently exhaustive to enable 
the student, after completing the course, to name any of 
the ordinary weeds and grasses that he will encounter in 

this section. ». 

In the junior class, in the course of chemistry and ag- 
riculture, two terms are devoted to systematic and struc- 
tural botany, and to advanced laboratory work with the 
microscope in the preparation of spedmens showing 
plant structure ; this work is sufficient to famihanz the 
students with the methods of plant budding and cellular 
organization. Excellent microscopes of the most im- 
proved patterns, and all necessary chemicals and appar- 
atus for preparing and mounting vegetable tissues, are 

used by the students. . 

The third term is devoted to the study of the physiol- 



56 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 






ogy of plants in order to understand the functions of the 
various organs after completion of the work in the his- 
tological laboratory. 

FACILITIES FOR WORK. 
Gtotom. -The department is equipped with models of Mount 
Shasta, the earthquake of 1887 in Japan, glass crystals for teaching 
crystallography • charts and maps of the geology of America and Eu 
rope ; Colt's lantern complete, with oil, oxy-hydrogen and automatic 
electric lamps; a large assortment of fine lantern slides representing 
geological formations in this country and abroad ; well equipped min 
eralogical laboratory for thirty students, supplied with a collection of 
representative minerals; and models of crystals 

*o*«» v .-The facilities for teaching this subject are as follows • 
Auzoux s clast.c models of seeds and flowers; a large collection of 
pressed plants of Alabama and other section;, mounted Z Z ! 
logued There ,s also a laboratory for practical work in botany 
equipped with slate-topped tables for twenty students ; dissecting and 
compound m.croscopes by Zeiss, Leitz, and Bausch 4 Lomb- mofec 
t.o„ .mcroscop.c apparatus ; microtomes by King and Bausch 4 Lomb • 
all the necessary glass ware and smaller dissecting instrument 

tirstS • p P r:^s: ri ;;r nt -; k in connection «* 

changers Abbe's camp™ l a , '"uminat.ng apparatus, slide 

(WnnV „ , U °u ' polarizers > apochromatic objectives 

., 7; ' ' ' and hom °geneous immersion), oculars (2 3 8 

ft* J*! TJS£ ' " e,eCtWCity and WI ' th a *°° d -P— 

roonraT::;::^:; e p,:r me, ; t there is a *w*«.** 

varying in size f -om 4 x ftZ5??£?. °f *' C ° n8istin * of 
fessional photo-mio -n lz***?*% ,nches >' Bau8 <* & Lomb's pro- 

stigmat *S5^iTr,2?S5 t0 ^ ht feet; Zeiss ' s ana - 

phragm shutter, and Zeiss WM^* , f W ' th BaUS ° h * L ° mb ' S dia " 
in aluminum; 6lark's iZ Z^a £t *"*' ****%>>& «»>unted 
'ens,, x5 ; t., ac^sor p S s ^ ****» Gutter; Darlot 
class work in photography chemicals required for first 

The students have aceM* t„ *u ■_ 
mentsin grass culture and nil 5S / ^'^ WherC eXpe "- 
farmer are conducted by the profe Ssor P ^ ° f intereSt t0 the 

Text-Books 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 57 || 

CIVIL ENGINEERING AND DRAWING. II 

PROFESSOR LANE. I] 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 1 

The special studies in this department begin in the , I I 

junior class, and require a good knowledge of algebra, , I 

geometry, trigonometry, and analytical mechanics. I 

They are as follows : I 

Junior Class — Simple, compound, reversed and para- I 

bolical curves, turnouts and crossings, leveling, gradients, I 

setting slope stakes, etc. 1 

Special attention will be paid in this class to the loca- ! I 

tion, construction, drainage and maintenance of country I 

roads; and the various pavements and foundations for 1 

the same. 1 1 

Senior Class— Classification, appearances, defects, :| 

seasoning, durability and preservation of timber ; classi- I 

fication and description of natural building stones ; bricks 1 1 

and concretes; cast and wrought iron, steel and other j| 
metals ; limes, cements, mortars and their manufacture ; 

paints and other preservatives ; classification of strains 
and a general mathematical discussion of same; joints 
and fastenings ; solid and open built beams; classifica- 
tion, construction and mechanics of masonry; founda- 
tions on land and in water ; bridges and roofs of differ-, 
ent kinds, their construction and strains determined 
mathematically and graphically; common roads, their 
coverings,' location and construction of railroads ; navi- 
gable, irrigation and drainage canals; River and sea- 
coast improvements. 
Theory and practice are combined in both classes • 

Text-Books. 
Junior Class.-Henck's Field Book for Kail way Engineers and 
Byrne's Highway Construction. ,■/_.■ . 

Senior Class-Wheeler's Civil Engineering and Von Ott s Graphic 

Statics. 

5 



68 



Alabama Polytechnic Inotttute: 

DRAWING. 



All of the students of the freshman and sophomore- 
classes are required to take drawing ; but only the stu- 
dents in civil engineering in the junior and senior 
classes. 

The freshman class is taught linear and free-hand 
drawing. The sophomore class is instructed in the prin- 
ciples of orthographic and isometric projections, shades 
shadows, perspective and tinting. In the junior class 
the instruction embraces a more extended course in or- 
thographic and isometric drawing, perspective, shades 
and tinting ; also sketches of tools and machines, plans 
and elevations and cross-sections of buildings, and blue 
prints. The senior class makes topographical drawings > 
and drawings of machines, roofs, bridges, etc., to differ- 
ent scales, and blue prints. Plans, profiles and sections of 
railroad surveys complete the instruction in this de- 
partment. 

Text-Book 8. 

Freshman Class.— Kitchener's Geometrical Note Book, Thome's 
Junior Course in Mechanical Drawing, and Davidson's Model Draw- 
ing- 
Sophomore Class— Davidson's Projections, Davidson's Practical' 
Perspective, Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. 

Junior Class.— Davidson's Building Construction, Davidson's Draw- 
ing for Mechanics and Engineers, Plates belonging to the College, 
Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. 

Senior Class.— French, English and American plates belonging to 
the College, Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. 



ENGLISH AND POLITICAL ECONOMY. 

PROFESSOR THACH. 
OBJECTS AND METHODS. 

In this department the students pursue a systematic- 
course in the English language and literature. 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



59 



Language is the avenue of approach to all knowledge ; 
the interpretation of words is the fundamental process in 
education of whatsoever kind. A full course in English 
is, therefore, considered especially important in the 
technical .courses of study that do not include the ancient 
classics. Accordingly, the course of English is continued 
throughout the four years of the college curriculum, 
three hours a week, and is made obligatory upon all 
students, with the exception of those pursuing the first 
two years of the course in Latin. In this extended drill 
in the grammar and literature of the English language, 
the endeavor is made to afford a training somewhat 
equivalent to the ordinary course in the classical lan- 
guages. 

In view of the ill preparation in languages, especially in their mother 
tongue, exhibited by many of the candidates for admission to the 
freshman class, it is deemed advisable, for the sake of honest work, 
to devote a portion of the first year to grounding such students in 
the principles of grammar. 

Especial attention is given to the study of the writings, themselves, 
•of leading English anthors, since direct contact with literature is 
considered more profitable than information merely about literature. 

All students before classed as regular in any course leading to a 
degree must conform to all the requirements in English for admission 

:as set forth on page 32. 

For requirements as to thesis and as to proficiency in English for 

■certificates and degrees see page 39. 

Declamation and themes (or orations) are required of all regular 

•students. For details see below. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

Freshman Class.— Five hours a week; study of grammar, the prin- 
ciples of special and general composition, with frequent brief papers 
illustrating the laws studied; study of American authors: Irving 
Hawthorne, Holmes, Poe, Bryant, Longfellow. 

Swinton's English Grammar, Lockwood's Rhetoric, Kellogg & Reed's 

English Language. 

Sophomore Class.— Three hours a week; study of style, analysis of 
-selections of prose and poetry, frequent essays on historic and liter- 
ary themes. 

Carpenter's Rhetoric, Genung's Rhetorical Analysis, Syle s From 

3Iilton to Tennyson. 






60 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 












Junior Class. — Three hours a week ; lectures on the history of Eng- 
lish literature, critical study of English classics, essays. 

Pancoast's History of English Literature ; Palgrave's Golden Treas- 
ury: Macaulay, Carlyle, DeQuincey, etc. 

Senior Class.— Two hours a week, first term. Principles of Criti- 
cism, Shakespeare's Julius Cresar, Hamlet, Dowden's Shakespeare 
etc. 

THEMES AND ORATIONS. 

Theory without practice is as fruitless in the study of English as 
in any other department of study. Practical work is indispensable to 
the successful teaching of English. 

Besides numerous brief papers, illustrative of the subject matter of 
the text-books, set themes or orations are required of all students:— 
For the freshman class, tf themes a year ; ten for the sophomore ; for 
the senior and junior classes, three orations each. 

DECLAMATION. 

The old practice of committing pieces to memory for "speaking" is 
cultivated as a means, both of training in the art of thinking on the 
feet and of storing the mind with the diction of finished specimens of 
English style. 

The sophomore class is heard weekly throughout the year in sec- 
tions of ten, once for an hour and a half in rehearsal, afterwards in 
the study hall before the body of students. 

The senior and junior classes also deliver their orations in public. 
PHILOSOPHY AND POLITICAL ECONOMY. 

The entire senior class pursues the study of intellec- 
tual science, twice a week, through the year fand political 
economy twice a week, during the last two terms The 
instruction in this department is by lectures in combina- 
tion with text-books. 

mt^ defi;,ed - VaIue - Nation ^ 

St : u ^ UC ?H° n ' and NatUral ScienCeS The relation of 

ttment* ffft i^W^* the Materialist. Counter ar- 
*Z t££?- ^Z I' S ° Ul The natUl>e ° f Piousness. 
Langu J T Tubmen T\ Im ^ natio "- Natu - «f Conceptions. 
**E^^ DedUCti0n ' I^-tion, etc. 

unL^Jo T^^t^^f WeaIth ^ wages /traded 
H- I UHlf feducatio Jff S^^S* g ° V ™ ' *» 



K ~- 









mm • 



■31 -^, J 



.. *», .. > *■■ ■ 





CHEMICAL LABORATORY Ontfrior^ 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



(51 



A Post-graduate Course has also been established in English, The 
following courses have been given : 

(1) Shakespeare. — Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, Merchant of Venice, 
As You Like It, Henry IV, Part I. Richard III, King John. 

(2) Dryden — Poetical Works (Christie); Essay of Dramatic Poesy 
<Thomas Arnold) ; Essay on Satire, etc., ( Yonge) ; Saintsbury's Life of 
Dry den. 

Pope— Poetical Works (Ward) ; Satires (Pattison) ; Stephen's Life of 
Pope, Gosse's From Shakespeare to Pope and ISth Century Literature. 

(3) English Literature of the Eighteenth Century: Addison, Pope, 
Gray, Goldsmith, Burns, Cowper Burke. 

»(4) American Literature: Longfellow, Lowell, Poe. 



CHEMISTRY. 



PROFESSOR B. B. ROSS. 

Instruction in this department embraces — 

1. A course of lectures in general chemistry. 

2. A course of lectures in industrial chemistry. 
2. A course of lectures in agricultural chemistry. 

4. Systematic laboratory work in connection with 
<each course of lectures, for the practice of chemical anal- 
ysis and chemical research. 

1. Course in general chemistry : This consists of a 
■S3ries of lectures (three per week) extending throughout 
the entire session, and includes a discussion of the fun- 
damental principles of chemical philosophy in connec- 
tion with the history, preparation, properties and com- 
pounds of the metallic and non-metallic elements, with 
the main facts and principles of organic chemistry. In 
this course the more common applications of chemistry 
to the arts ajnd manufactures are discussed. The appa- 
ratus used for experimental illustration isextensiye, con- 
taining the newest and approved improvements neces- 
sary for presenting the subject in the most attractive and 
instructive form. 









% 






-62 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Roscoe & Schorlemmer, Fownes, Frankland^ Remsen, Cooke's 
Ohemical Philosophy. Chemical Journals. 

2. Lectures on industrial chemistry (three per week) 
extend throughout the session, and include a discussion 
in detail of the processes and chemical principles in- 
volved in the most important applications of chemistry 
-in the arts and manufactures to the reduction of ores, 
the preparation of materials for food and drink, for cloth- 
ing, shelter, illumination, cleansing, purifying, writing, 
sprinting, etc. 

These lectures are amply illustrated by means of suit- 
able specimens of raw materials and manufactured pro- 
ducts, together with models and diagrams. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Wagner's Chemical Technology, Muspratt's Chemistry as applied 
•to Arts and Manufacturing, lire's Dictionary, Watt's Dictionary 
Richardson and Watt's Chemical Technology, Percy s Metallurgy 
Sadtler's Industrial Organic Chemistry. 

3. Course in agricultural chemistry: This consists 
of lectures on chemistry in its applications to agricul- 
ture (two per week), and includes a thorough discussion 
of the origin, composition and classification of soils the 
•composition and growth of plants, the sources of plant 
food and how obtained, the improvement of soils the 
manufacture and use of fertilizers, the chemical princi- 
ples involved in the rotation of crops, the feeding of live 
stock, and the various operations carried on by the in- 
telligent and successful agriculturist,. 

REFERENCE BOOKS 

Johnson's How Crops Grow and How Crops Feed T nnW* iri 
-entary Principles of Scientific J^^^^n^l^ 
Elements of Agricultural Chemistry, Storer's Agriculture in xelaUon 
^oChem.stry, scientific journals, reports of the United I Ltt rtL 
partment of Agriculture, and the bulletins and r^of i?S& 
iiome and foreign agricultural departments and stations 






! I 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 6$ 

4. The course of systematic laboratory work : This 
course of practical work in the laboratory is carried ow 
in connection with each course of lectures, and embraces- 
the practical operations of chemical analysis and synthe- 
sis, being varied somewhat to suit the individual ob- 
ject of the student. 

The laboratories which are open from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. , during six 
days in the week, are amply supplied with everything necessary for 
instruction in chemical manipulation, in the qualitative and quanti- 
tative analysis of soils, fertilizers, feed stuffs, sugar products, min- 
erals, mineral waters, technical products, etc., and in the method of 
prosecuting chemical researches. Unusual facilities are offered to 
students who wish to devote their time to the special study of prac- 
tical chemistry . 

Each student on entering the chemical laboratory is furnished 
with a work table, a set of re-agent bottles, and the common re- 
agents and apparatus used in qualitative and quantitative analysis. 

At the close of the session he will be credited with such articles as 
may be returned in good order; the value of those which have been 
injured or destroyed will be deducted from his contingent fee. 

In addition to the analytical work above described, it is designed 
to give during the session a short course in electro-plating. Practical: 
instruction in the electro-deposition of nickel, silver, gold, etc., upon 
other metals will be given, and, in addition, the application of elec- 
trolysis to chemical analysis will be studied both theoretically and 
practically. 

Books Used. 

In qualitative analysis— Jones's Fresenius Plattner. 

In quantitative analysis-Freseriius, Sutton, Rose, Bunsen, Rick- 
ett's Notes on Assaying, Mitchell's Manual of Practical Assaying. 

In agricultural chemical analysis-Official methods of the Associa- 
tion of Agricultural Chemists, Wiley's Principles and Practice of 
Agricultural Analysis. 

CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

[For description of the building see page 14. ] 

The chemical apparatus recently purchased for the laboratory con- 
sists of a full supply of the most approved instruments for practical 
work and investigation. The building is supplied with water and gas 
and every appliance required to meet th« demands of modern scien- 
tific instruction and research. In addition to the apparatus usually 



r 



?**^ 



64 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



supplied to first-class laboratories, there have been imported a new 
and improved Schmidt and Hensch's polariscope, four short-arm 
Becker balances of latest pattern, Bunsen spectroscope, Zeiss micros- 
cope, and other instruments for delicate and accurate work. 



HISTORY AND LATIN. 



PROFESSOR PETRIE. 



u 



HISTORY. 

In this department the aim is not so much' to* rnerm> 
rize facts as to understand them. Strong emphasis is- 
laid on the fact that history is not a succession of iso- 
lated facts but a progressive whole, each event being 
at once the cause and the effect of other events. 
The students are taught to investigate the growth 
of ideas and institutions, the rise an'd progress of 
great historical movements and the reciprocal influences 
of men and circumstances. Frequent use is made of 
diagrams, photographs, charts and maps, with which the 
department is well equipped. Constant practice in map. 
drawing is insisted on in order to give precision to the 
geographical knowledge acquired. Instruction is given 
by text-books, lectures and class discussion, but a con- 
stant effort is made to stimulate to wider reading and 
research in the library. 

In the freshman class, the subjects studied are the 
United States, Alabama, and England. The first term; 
(two hours per week) is devoted to the history and gov- 
ernment of the United States, the second term (two 
hours per week) to Alabama, and the third term (three 
hours per week) to the history of England. 

In the sophomore class (three hours per week until 
March) the subject studied is general European history. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 65 

In the junior and senior classes opportunity for special historical 
work is given to those students of the general course who may elect 
it instead of laboratory work. The work in 1899-1000 will be in Ameri- 
can and English history, social, political and constitutional. 

The work will be partly by lectures; but students will also investi- 
gate in the library, under the direction of the professor, topics con- 
nected with the lectures and will report to the class the results of 
their research. These reports will be made the basis Of general dis- 
cussion . A series of lectures will be given from time to time on current 
foreign events, and on important points in recent history. 

Text- Books. 

Freshman Class.— Cooper, Estill & Lemmon's History of the United 
States, Thorpe & McCorvey's Civil Government in the United States 
and Alabama, Montgomery's English History. 

Sophomore class.— Myers's General History. 

Junior and Senior classes.— Hart's Formation of the Union, Wood- 
row Wilson's Division and Reunion, Green's History of England. 



LATIN. 

The objects kept in view in this department are : an 
accurate knowledge of the forms and syntax ; a famili- 
arity with Latin words, their etymology and their Eng- 
lish derivatives ; an appreciation of Latin literature and 
an intelligent conception of Roman history and civiliza- 
tion both in themselves and in their effect on the mod- 
ern world . 

A systematic course of instruction is given in the forms and 
syntax. These are taught both deductively from a grammar and in- 
ductively from the text read. Translation is constantly practiced, 
sometimes at sight, sometimes after being assigned for preparation. 
English passages based on a familiar author or illustrative of special 
constructions are put into Latin, both orally and in writing. Great 
emphasis is laid on the etymology of the words in the text read. 

In connection with every author studied in class a course of reading 
in English is prescribed descriptive of his life, work and times. The 
historical setting and the literary value of his writings are carefully 
discussed and frequent comparisons are made with modern authors. 

For the benefit of students who do not study the Latin language a 
series of popular lectures will be given upon the great Latin writers. 
Especial emphasis is laid on proficiency in writing Latin exercises 
and in translating Latin prose at sight. 
6 



t 

i < 



66 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute: 










Tkxt-Books. 

Freshman's Class.— Grammar, Exercises, Nepos, Sallust. 
Sophomore Class.— Cicero, Allen & Greenough's Grammar, Exer- 
.cises. 

Junior Class.— Virgil, Horace, A. & G 's Grammar, Exercises, Al- 
len's History of Rome, Wilkins' Roman Antiquities. 
Senior Class.— Livy, Tacitus, Wilkins's Latin Literature, Exercises. 



MODERN LANGUAGES. 

PROFESSOR C. H. ROSS. 

The following regular courses are given in French and! 
German : 

French — First Year: Three recitations a week. Dur- 
ing this year the principal object is to acquire a knowl- 
edge of the elements of grammar and a correct pronun- 
ciation, together with a facility in translating ordinary 
French. Reading is begun at an early stage, and 
the principles of grammar are illustrated and impressed 
by frequent exercises in rendering English into French. 

Second Year: Three recitations a week. During this 
year almost the same line of work is pursued as that 
begun in the previous year. More difficult and varied 
French is read, and instruction is given upon the laws 
of grammar, the construction of the language, and the 
history of the literature. Special attention is given to 
sight translation. 

German— Two Years : Three recitations a week the first 
year, three a week the second year. In this course the- 
aim and the methods are similar to those in French. 

Tkxt-Books. T' 

French-^ Year : French Principia, Pts. I & II ; Jules Verne'* 
Michel Strogoff, Rogers's Sight Reading in French. 

Second Yeur : Feuillet's Le Roman d'un Jeune Homme Pauvre 
Dumas' La Tulipe Noire ; French Composition. 

German-JV^ Year: Harris's German Lessons; Super's Elemen- 
tary German Reader, Zschokke's Der Zerbrochene Krug 

Second Year: Schiller's Ballads, Hauff's D^ Kalte Herz • 
hardt's German Composition. 



.;, Bern- 



, 4 



i 



M 




ELECTRICAL BUILDING. 



> 






Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 67 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

PROFESSOR MCRISSICK. 

The students in this course will study English, French, or German, 
physics, mathematics, etc., as now prescribed for the course of civil 
engineering in the junior and senior years; and, in addition thereto, 
will prosecute their studies in electricity and mechanics, as herein 
prescribed. 

(■;•;"■ JUNIOR YEAR. 

Four hours a week for the entire session are devoted 
to the studies of the principles of electricity and mag- 
netism. The student is made familiar with the theoret- 
ical principles by experiments, illustrations, recitations, 
and lectures. 

Laboratory Work. — Four hours per week are given 
to work in the laboratory. This includes management 
of batteries, construction of instruments, electro-plating, 
electrical measurements, verification of the principles 
upon which the measurements of current, electromotive 
force and resistance are based, etc. 

Text-Books. 

Ayrton's Practical Electricity, Stewart and Gee's Practical Physics, 
^Nichol's Laboratory Manual, Vol. I. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

In the senior year five hours per week are devoted to 
theoretical instruction in electricity and magnetism, sup- 
plemented by a course of lectures and practical demon-, 
stration on the applications of electricity to lighting, 
electric railways, electrical transmission of energy, poly- 
phase currents, electrical welding, etc. 

Encouragement is offered to advanced students for conducting 
original investigations, and opportunity is taken to stimulate a spirit 
of scientific inquiry. Courses of reading are suggested to such stu- 
dents in connection with their experimental work. 






t 




I 



■~— — ^W— — — B^ ! 






l 



68 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

Laboratory Work.— Six hours per week are devoted 
to practical laboratory work, electrical measurements, 
relation of electrical currents to heat and mechanical 
work, care and tests of dynamo and motors, calibration 
of voltmeters, ammeters and watt-meters, electric light- 
ing, management and care of accumulators, energy con- 
sumed in lamps, adjustment and care of arc lamps, 
proper wiring of buildings, the application of electricity 
to street railways, magnetic measurements, tests of 
transformers and alternating motors, etc. 

Drawing and Construction.— Two hours per week in 
the senior year are devoted to the design and construc- 
tion of electrical machinery. The student is required to 
make original designs of dynamos, motors, transformers, 
etc. 

Text-Books. 

Thompson's Dynamo Electric Machinery, Bell's Power Transmis- 
sion, NichoPs Laboratory Manual, Vol. II. 

Post-graduate Course. 

This includes advanced study and laboratory work in alternating 
/currents. 

Reference Books. 

The Dynamo by Hawkins & Wallace, Alternating Currents by Jack- 
son, Principles of the Transformer by Bedell, Dynamos, Alternators 
and Transformers by Kapp, Alternating Current Phenomena by 4 
Steinmetz. 



?-». ,'' 



'* 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



69 








u 









PLkN 

OF 

£LECTR\CKL UBORKTDFW 
MX.PQOUN5T. 

5CKLE.0F FEET 



5= 







T\ 



u 



B 



o 



a 



<]ti 



1NBEX 



Z £ 




TO PLKN 

K-KTLKS F_NG\*lfc 
8-tttST\NG*\aUSC CNGINt 
C-tD\5QN TyrnKKiO^K-W 
U- .. . -ll-KW 

t- WESTON . 
r-STKR 

G-U)tRA. MJtRNNTOR 
H- MQTOR-GtNERKTORS 
\ -T-V\ DVNWO 
1- .. KRC . 
K- \t.JDUCT\ON MOTOR 
V.-lfOo VOLT GCNERKTOR 
M-BRV15H KRCDXVKMO 
N-aUtCN TKNMAO 
Q-TWOPHNSL 'M-T. 
P-C.E.INDCTION MOTOR 
0-5TMtLE< - 
R-CROCKCR-WHUUB - 
S-SWVTCH-BtJKRD 
T-UMP •• , mm 

U -INSTRUMENT CKStS 
V-BRU5H RXRUUKTOR 
W-NaRMTKRU 
X-TH ntSULKTQO 













V 






• 



X 



i 



70 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



<" EQUIPMENT. -- 

The electrical laboratory has a complete line of batteries, call-bells 
annunciators, telegraph sounders, relays, keys, magnets ; galvanome- 
ters, resistance boxes, electro-plating apparatus, and all apparatus 
for students in electrical engineering. The equipment comprises 
many fine instruments of precision: Lord Kelvin's standard 
100 ampere balance (either for direct or alternating currents); 
Lord Kelvin's graded current galvanometer, reading 600 amperes ; 
also, his graded-potential galvanometer, reading 600 volts; Weston 
alternating current voltmeter, Weston direct reading watt-meter, 
Queen's "Acme" testing set, Kelvin electro-static voltmeter, Cardew 
voltmeter (for direct or alternating currents), reading to 150 volts; 
Weston's standard ammeter and voltmeter, box of resisting coils;' 
Queen's magnetic vane voltmeter, and ammeter, standard micro-farad 
condenser and Sabine key ; Thompson's watt-meter, ballistic reflect- 
ing galvanometer, mirror galvanometer, Fein ammeter and voltmeter j 
Ayrton & Perry ammeter, Thomson inclined coil ammeter, Edison- 
ammeters, Kohl's solenoid ammeter, Wood ammeter, Deprez am- 
meter Hartman <fe Braun voltmeter, D'Arsonval galvanometer, Row- 
land-D Arson val galvanometer, cable testing apparatus, Hughe's in- 
duction balance, tasimeter, microphone, telephones, electrolytic ap- 
paratus and several mirror and other galvanometers for first year 
st uuen tSt 

In the dynamo room the following are installed : One Weston 150 
volt, 20 ampere dynamo, with rheostat ; one Brush 6 arc light dynamo, 
with regulator and six lamps ; one Ideal 5 kilo-watt three phase 
alternator; one Thomson-Houston 9 arc light dynamo with lamJ! 

Houston no CO ",?T d W ° Und 12 kil °- Wa " generator ; a Th °~ 
Hous on 110 volt, ,5 ampere generator ; two street car motors used 
as e.ther direct or alternating current generators or motors • two 
polyphase induction motors ; one General Electric 5 horsepower .n- 
duct.on motor mounted on cradle dynamometer ; General E?eclr? c £) 

tdson3^ k.lo-watt generator; a Crocker-Wheeler one horse-power 
motor and rheostat, and one bi-phase alternator, and 500 volt g"n- 

SSK 8PeCi ^ 8tUdent8 ' fUrni8h Curre » t t0 laboratory g and 
Sw hi h d ' ff ? re " tb » ildln «"- A lamp board with a capacity of 210 
lamps has been mstalled and is used for testing purposes 

areopera^T^f I ^^ bl ' ick buildin *" ^32 feet, and 

ss^aaasr westinghouse verticai ***• ** 

SHJSSSSU Y"* VmVM Whh Lwd Kel ™' 8 *-dard 
•™Ln« mst,Uments for exa «t measurements, will calibrate free of 

In elir ammeter ° r V ° Umeter that m ^ be sent to the ColW 
An electnc motor made by students, supplied with current fro* a 




^^ 






— 



■■■Hi 



a- .■wii W ii»' " «i| m i '. l m i« n« . . . . .: ■- 









1 




WOOD ROOM. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



71 



generator at a distance of 3,000 feet, operates a gin, gin press, ensi- 
lage cutter and feed cutter at the experiment station farm. This- 
motor not only subserves a useful purpose in the operation of these 
machines, but is an excellent illustration of the electric transmission 
of power. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND MECHANIC 

ARTS. 

PROFESSOR WILMORE. 

B. H. CRENSHAW, ) 

R. J. TRAMMELL, > ASSISTANTS. 

M. T. FULLAN, ) 

MECHANIC ARTS. 

• 

The course in manual training covers three years, as 
follows : first year, wood-working — carpentry and turn- 
ing ; second year, pattern making and foundry and forgo 
work— molding, casting and smithing ; third year, ma- 
chine shop — chipping and filing and machine work in 

metals. 

This course is obligatory upon the students of the- 
three lower classes. For satisfactory reasons a student 
may be excused from this laboratory work by the Fac- 
ulty. 

The full work of each class is six hours per week, in 
three exercises of two hours each. 

The power for running the apparatus in this department is derived 
from a twenty-five horse-power Harris-Corliss automatic engine 
which is supplied with steam by a thirty horse-power steel horizontal 
tubular boiler. A steam pump and a heater for the feed water, form 
a part of the steam apparatus. For the steam plant a substantial 
brick boiler-house and chimney have been erected. 

The equipment for the wood-working shop comprises the following r 
30 wood-working benches, each with complete set of carpenter's tools ; 
24 turning-lathes, 10-inch swing, each with complete set of tools; 
1 double circular saw ; 1 band saw ; 1 board-planing machine; 1 
jointer; 1 pattern-maker's lathe, 16-inch swing; 1 36-inch 
grindstone. The tool room is supplied with a variety of extra band-' 












f 



\ 



72 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

tools for special work, an* in addition to the regular carpenter's tools 
in the benches, each student is supplied with a set of chisels and plane 
irons with a locker to keep them in and is held responsible for their 
care and condition. 

The equipment for the foundry consists of molding benches for 
18 students, each supplied with a complete set of molder's tools ; a 
23-inch Colliau cupola, with all modern improvements, capable of 
melting 2,000 pounds of iron per hour ; a brass furnace in which cam 
be melted 100 pounds of brass at a heat, with a set of crucible tongs, 
etc. Also a full supply of ladles, large and small moulding flasks, a 
foundry crane, special tools, etc. 

The forge shop equipment consists of 16 hand forges of new pattern, 
each with a set of smith's tools, anvil, etc. The blast for all the 
forges is supplied by a Nq. 3 Sturtevant steel pressure blower (which 
also furnishes blast for the foundry cupola), and a No. 15 Sturtevant 
exhaust blower draws the smoke from the fires into the smoke-flues 
and forces it out through the chimney. 

The machine department occupies a brick building, 30 x 50 feet, and 
is equipped with eight engine-lathes, (screw-cutting), 14-inch swing, 
6-foot bed ; 2 engine lathes 16-inch swing, (one with taper attach^ 
ment); 1 engine lathe, 18-inch swing, with compound rest 
and taper attachment): 1 speed lathe, 10-inch swing; 1 20-inch 
drill press (power feed); 1 10-inch sensitive drill; 1 15-inch 
shaper; 1 22-inch x 22 inch x 5 feet planer; 1 universal 
milling machine; 1 corundum tool grinder (14-inch wheel); I 
bench grinder; 1 post drill press, 14-inch; 1 universal cutter and 
reamer grinder; 1 Brown and Sharpe universal grinding machine ; 1 
power hack saw. A part of the room is set apart for vise-work,, 
chipping and filing; and benches for 12 students are provided, each 
with vise and set of files, chisels, hammers, etc. In the tool-room is 
to be found a good supply of machinists' tools for general shop use, 
sach as lathe and drill chucks, drills, reamers, taps, dies, gauges, 
files, cutting and measuring tools, and special appliances for machine 
work, with machine for grinding twist drills. 

The nature of the work in each department is as fol- 
lows : 

First Year. 

I. A course of carpentry or hand work covering the first two terms. 
The essons include instruction in the nature and use of tools, in- 
struction and practice in shop drawing, elementary work with plane, 
saw chisel, different kinds of joints, timber-splices, cross joints,, 
mortise and tenon, mitre and frame work, dovetail work, comprising 
different kinds of joints' used in cabinet making, light cabinet work 
examples in building, framing, roof-trusses, etc 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



73 



II. A course in turning, extending through the third term. The 
lessons comprise, first, nature and use of lathe and tools, plain, 
straight turning, caliper work to different diameters and lengths, 
simple and compound curves, screw plate and chuck work, hollow 
and spherical turning. 

Second Year. 

I. A course in forge work in iron and steel, occupying the first 
term. The lessons are arranged so that the students in making the 
series of objects, become familiar with the nature of the metals and 
the successive steps in working them by hand into simple and com- 
plex forms, as drawing, upsetting, bending, cutting, punching, weld- 
ing by various methods, tool-forging, tempering, hardening, etc. 

II. A course in pattern-making covering the second term. The 
work includes a variety of examples of whole and split patterns, core 
work, etc., giving the student* familiarity with the use of patterns 

for general molding. 

III. A course in molding and casting in iron and brass occupy- 
ing the third term. The work consists for the most part of small 
articles, such as light machine parts, but a sufficient variety of forms 
are introduced for the student to acquire a good general and practi- 
cal knowledge of the usual methods and appliances used in light 
foundry work. Most of the work is in green sand in two part flasks ; 
core work is also given, and some three part flask and some dry sand 
work is introduced. 

The same patterns which have been previously made by students 
are used, besides special patterns for occasional larger or more com- 
plicated work. Instruction and practioe is given in working the 

cupola. 

In connection with this second year work, a series of lectures is 
given on the metallurgy and working of the metals used in the indus- 
trial arts, cast and wrought iron, steel, brass, etc. 

Third Year. 

I. A course of chipping and filing, covering the first term. The 
lessons comprise work on cast and wrought iron ; chipping to line on 
flat and curved sufaces, key-seating, etc., filing and finishing to line 
(straight and curved), surface filing and finishing, fitting, slotting, 
vedotail work, sawing, pin and screw filing, surface finishing with 

scraper, etc. 

II. Machine work occupying the remainder of the year. The 
work includes cast and wrought iron, steel and brass; turning to 
various diameters and lengths, taper turning, facing with chuck and 
face plate, drilling— both in lathe and drill press,— reaming, boring, 
gcrew-cutting in lathe and with taps and dies, planing, slotting, etc., 

7 






74 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 









with planer and shaper, milling various forms with the milling ma- 
chine, including exercises in making taps, reamers, etc., fitting, grind- 
ing, polishing, etc. 

Lectures are also given during the year on various subjects con- 
nected with machine work in metals ; such as forms, construction and 
use of the various machines, cutting tools, gearing, gauges, screw 
threads, etc. During the last term some piece of construction work 
is given the classes. 

All of the work is done from blue prints made by the class in draw- 
ing. In the construction work, the student is given a blue print and 
the material for a certain part. He is then encouraged to studv th* 
work and plan the best method of doing it. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 
JUNIOR YEAR. 

Elementary Mechanics .—Three hours a week for the first 
term are devoted to this subject. The fundamental laws 
underlying all mechanical science and the mechanics of 
liquids, gases and vapors are studied. 

Principles of Mechanism.-Thvee recitations per week 
during the second and third terms are devoted to this 
subject. 

M^yiasas 7^ and their eiementai - y — 

gear wheels hlZ T The commun ication of motion by 

obtainine it £ Ca nS ', Screws and 'ink-work, the different ways of 

•;. -ins it^wasa ass? the motion through 
^Wisssari? r the students — 

dent takes his own mea sm-eZl f T^ machines - T «e stu- 
which to make the JSStoSf* "*" * ° WD ^^ fr0m 

-Xtsns^j^'sM st r d at the beginning 

comparatively simple mLZT , l the end of the ?™ r - Some 
tails. O^SSr^jJJl^-^frdito*- 
mechanical arrangement with I , stre ngth of the parts and their 
An actual machinToT t h ™ I • T* t0 faCiHty of manufacture, 
tained, the dimensions 1*7 ?**&* of tt machine are ob- 
the theoretical formulu «nd"S Wlth th ° 8e obtained by applying 
two studied. he cause * of variation between the 



— «— 







COAL f< 

lit 20 

( 



CHtHH€\ 
tor* 






Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



75 



Laboratory Work. — The laboratory work will consist of hand work 
in iron and machine work in iron, as given in the course in mechanic 



arts in the third year. 



Text-Books. 



Wood's Elementary Mechanics; Stahl and Wood's Elementary 
Mechanism. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Mechanical Engineering of Power Plants. — The first term 
five hours per week is given to the study of the practical 
applications of steam machinery. It is believed that a 
thorough knowledge of the apparatus in actual practical 
use is the best preparation a student can have for the 
study of the theory, and to that end, the different types 
of engines, boilers, pumps, condensers, and other auxil- 
iary apparatus are taken up and studied in detail, and 
the advantages and disadvantages of each discussed. 
Extensive files of manufacturer's catalogues are kept 
and the technical papers and magazines in the library 
are freely used in order to keep in touch with the latest 
and best practice in engineering work. 

Steam Engine .-The second term five hours per week 
will be given to the study of the theory and efficiency of 
the steam engine, with discussions of the effects of con- 
densation in cylinder, action of fly-wheels, effects of 
jacketing, etc. Simple and compound engines, various 
valves and cut-off motions, and the principal types of 
modern engines are studied. Special attention is given 
to the steam engine indicator. 

Graphical Static, ****^^J*J?J&^ + 

horn/per week, will be g -en to the ^ dy of h, ^ d> 

vantage of graphical MMP^ gfrgJJl being made. B, 
and new applications of the formei we hine ma , be deter- 

itsuse.the forces acting in every part o fa n ac ne J 
mined, both in direction and intensity, without the 

matical formula. ie9 of i ectU res on 

During the remainder of the third *"."»> 
mechanical refrigeration and gas engines is given. 










< 









76 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



Machine Design.— The subject of machine design is 
made a continuation of the junior course and runs 
throughout the year, two hours a week. During the 
first term, the strength and proportions of different 
joints and fastenings are studied, and problems given 
for actual solution. During the remainder of the year 
the time is spent on steam engine design. The results 
as obtained from standard formulas are compared with 
the dimensions as used by the best constructors, and the 
reasons for variations, if any occur, are studied. 

Laboratory Work. — The students are not only taught how to cali- 
brate and use the different instruments, but they are brought in 
contact with engineering appliances under practical working con- 
ditions. 

Thoroughness of work is sought rather than the performance of a 
large number of experiments. * 

The following course has been arranged : 

Calibration of steam gauge; calibration of indicator spring; cali- 
bration of thermometer; calibration of scales and balances; calori- 
meter tests with barrel separating and throttling calorimeters ; boiler 
test with determination of the quality of steam and analysis of flue 
gas ; efficiency test of engine with brake and indicator power meas- 
urement ; test of hot air pumping engine ; efficiency and duty of a steam 
pump;tensional, compression^ and transverse tests of cast iron, 
wrought- iron, steel and wood, in which are observed the limit of 
e asticity, the ultimate breaking strength and the modulus of 
elasticity. 

This olass usually makes a test of some electric plant or mill some 
time in the last term. 

The apparatus for carrying on this work consists of 45 horse-power 
Imperial cross compound engine, especially arranged for experi- 
mental work, supp hed with Wheeler surface condenser and Deane 
elfn. P « /" rCulat,n « P U1 »P. of a 25 horse-power Harris-Corliss 
Itfa T:l? h t ™-J>™*' Westinghouse engine, a 25 horse-power 
the shlf ' ,? ' horse -P° w <* engines constructed by students in 
ests a P d„ ni'Tn e " g ' ne "* b ° iler es P eciall y for ™king efficiency 

Westinion ! ■ St / am """^ *" EricSSOn hot a * en * ine ' * 

SSI! 1 P ? P ' f0UI ' St6am en « ine indicators, a separating 

ra" us for te.^in T *"' ^^ * Standani st ea.u gauge with appa- 

s zriiT*z* a a a°;r y ^ ^—^- 

Henning micrometer ^^^^Z^^ 




1 




^WW^WW<-W(WfPWWP^M7^^^» 






" " ■* 



. 




LABORATORY OF BIOLOGY. 




n. ■ inn in, ■■ - 



w 



J 






■ 



<C- 




CO 

h 

UJ 

Q 
< 
O 

u. 
O 

CO 
Q. 
K 
O 
O 



"Aooioia jo Aaoivaoavi 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



81 



chemistry and agriculture, and to some practical work 
and "field lectures" to the students of the same course 
during the sophomore year. Instruction is given by 
lectures and text-book and by courses of reading, using 
the green house and orchards and gardens of the experi- 
ment station to give practical illustrations of the sub- 
jects taught. 

Attention is called to the various fruits and vegetables that can be 
successfully cultivated in Alabama, and methods of propagation, cul- 
tivation and marketing are discussed. Particular attention is called 
to the diseases and insect enemies to which each of these crops are 
liable, and careful directions are given as to the best known means 
of combatting them. The construction and management of green 
houses, hot beds and cold frames receive special attention, while such 
topics as floriculture, landscape gardening and forestry are discussed 

in a general way only. t # 

Special work will be arranged for any student desiring to ta«e 

a more extended course in horticulture . 



'" r MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS. 

COL. B. S. PATRICK, COMMANDANT. 

Military science and tactics are required by law to be 
taught in this institution. The law is faithfully carried 
out by imparting to each student, not physically inca- 
pacitated to bear arms, practical instruction in the 
school of the soldier, of the company and of the bat- 
talion in close and extended order, also in guard mount- 
ings, inspections, dress parades, reviews, etc 

Under section 1225, U. B; Revised Statutes, the Co - 
lege is provided with modern cadet rifles and accoutre 
mfnts. Ammunition for practice firing ««£j^ 
the direction of an experienced f^'^^S 
in target practice begin the first day of the third term^ 

The following uniform of standard cadet gray cloth 
. ine following g ag worn 

has been prescribed 101 aress . w r ,, 

at West Point, with sack coat for fatigue, dark blue 

8 



82 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



cadet cap. A neat and serviceable uniform can be ob- 
tained here at $14 to $15. This is less expensive than 
the usual clothing. All students are required to wear 
this uniform during the session. 

The entire body of students is divided into companies. 
The officers are selected for military efficiency, good 
conduct and scholarship. The commissioned officers 
will be selected either from the senior or junior 
classes, and promotion will depend on merit and not 
wholly on seniority. 

A band, composed of cadets, furnishes appropriate 
music at all reviews and parades, and on other special 
occasions. 

A student who has once accepted an office cannot resign it except 
for reasons entirely satisfactory to the President and Commandant. 
The resignation of his office by a minor will usually not be considered 
without first placing all the circumstances of the case before his 
parent or guardian. 

Candidates for appointment or promotion may be required to stand 
an examination Moral fitness, including demerits, will be consid- 
ered. 

No cadet can continue an officer in the corps who during a session 
is classed in the fourth grade in two or more subjects at any term 
examination, or in the fourth grade in any subject at two term 
examinations ; nor who receives during the session more than 60 
demerits. 

Examinations will be conducted by a Board of Officers, to be com- 
posed of the Commandant of Cadets and two commissioned officers,, 
to be designated by him. The proceedings of the Board are subject 
to revision and approval by the President of the College. 

Each company is officered by one captain, two first lieutenants, one 
second lieutenant, and with a proper number of non-commissioned 
officers. The officers and non-commissioned officers are distinguished 
by appropriate insignia of rank. These appointments are confirmed 
by the President on nomination of the Commandant. 

The junior class recites once a week in the United States Infantry 
Drill Regulations. 

The senior class recites once a week in "Notes on Military Science." 

On the graduation of each class the names of such students as have 
shown special aptitude for military service will be reported to the 
Adjutant-General of the U. S. Army, and the names of the three- 



I 




n^M 






Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



83 



1 






most distinguished in military science and tactics will be inserted in 
the U. 8. Army Register, and published in general orders from head- 
quarters of the army . 



(PHYSIOLOGY AND VETERINARY SCIENCE. 

PROFESSOR CARY. 
PHYSIOLOGY. 

The sophomore class studies human anatomy, physi- 
ology and hygiene during the entire college year. 

It is the aim of the department to give the students 
practical and real knowledge of the gross anatomy and 
functions of the various parts of the human body. Due 
attention is given, also, to the laws of health— the con- 
ditions most favorable to a continuous healthy action of 
the organs of the human body. 

Instruction is given by lectures and by text-books, 
supplemented by black-board drawings, charts, models 
of organs, a human skeleton, and by dissections of some 
of the smaller animals (dog, cat, etc.). 

Martin's Human Body is used as a text and reference 
book, and several other works on anatomy, physiology 
and hygiene may be consulted in the college and experi- 
ment station libraries. 

VETERINARY SCIENCE AND ART. 

Students in the agricultural and chemical course of 
study, during the entire junior and senior years, devote 
to this work two hours per week in the class room and 
three hours per week at practical clinics. Instruction 
in veterinary science and art is given by lectures. 

The lectures are arranged with special reference to the 
students who are interested in horses or other domestic 
animals ; also to those students who contemplate study- 
ing human or veterinary medicine. While it is not the 



>_, 



N 



84 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



aim to give a complete course in veterinary medicine, 
we attempt to present the general principles of com- 
parative medicine with such special applications as are 
adapted to the conditions and wants of the students . 



\ 




Special attention is given to the exterior anatomy of the horse, 
while comparative anatomy is presented mainly in connection with 
the study of the diseases of the different apparatus of the horse or 
other domestic animals. 

Lameness in the h.orse, minor surgery, the actions and uses of the 
most common medicines, the principles and practice of comparative 
medicine, and the ways of protecting the health of domestic animals, 
are considered in as plain and practical a manner as the time allotted 
to each subject will permit. Post mortem examinations and the 
dissection of domestic animals are used as object lessons in the study 
of general pathology and anatomy. 

The senior class in pharmacy devotes three hours per week, during 
the first and second terms, to the study of therapeutics ; and four 
hours per week during the third term to class room and laboratory 
work in bacteriology. 



*< 



^Y* 




mm 



I 



■I 






* 



^ 



' - 






■■■■■■■ 



■*m 




LABORATORY OF PHARMACY. 




J 



I 



■ 

■i 






Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



85 



1 



To the post-graduate student this department furnishes 
work in histology, bacteriology, pathology, meat and 
milk inspection. Such students may devote their entire 
time to work in this department with approval of 
faculty. 

The department of physiology and veterinary science is now loca- 
ted by itself in a building which consists of a two-story portion, con- 
taining four laboratory rooms on the second floor and a lecture room, 
museum and office on the lower floor; and a one-story part, which 
contains an operating room. 

The building is supplied with water and gas, and the laboratory is 
now equipped for work. The museum contains the skeletons of the 
horse, the ox, the sheep, and the hog, and a human skeleton. It also 
contains anatomical models of the various parts and organs of the 
human body and models of many parts of the horse, the ox and the 
other domestic animals. It also contains a collection of pathological 
and anatomical specimens, and one of animal parasites. 

The new veterinary hospital building contains five large box stalls, 
four open single stalls, an office and a feed room, on the lower floor; 
the upper floor is used as a storage room for hay, fodder, etc. The 
hospitals supplied with fresh water. 

Every Saturday during the college year, the department conducts 
a free clinic for the benefit of the students in veterinary science and 
art. Clinical cases have been various and numerous, giving the 
students opportunity to see and study many diseases and lamenesses 
and to become proficient in minor operations. 



PHARMACY AND PHARMACOGNOSY. 



PROFESSOR MILLER. 



f 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

Pharmacy. — Class work, three hours a week. The dif- 
ferent systems of weights and measures . Specific gravity. 
Pharmaceutical problems. The fundamental operations 
in pharmacy. Apparatus used in pharmaceutical pro- 
cesses. Discussion of all classes of pharmaceutical 
preparations. 



\y— TV 



86 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



Laboratory, nine hours a week. Preparation of official 
and non-official galenicals. 

Pharmacognosy. — Class work with laboratory work, 
four hours a week. All official vegetable drugs studied 
with aid of simple and compound microscope. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Pharmacy. — Class work, fmr hours a week. Official 
and non-official pharmaceutical chemicals, inorganic and 
organic, including the more important newer remedies. 
The prescription. Incompatibilities. Doses. 

Laboratory, nine hours a, week. Preparation of official 
and non-official pharmaceutical chemicals, inorganic and 
organic. Pharmaceutical testing by pharmacopoeial 
methods. Drug assaying, special attention given to 
compounding of prescriptions. 

Pharmacognosy. — Class work with laboratory work, 
four hours a week. Study of important non-official vege- 
table drugs ; of drugs of animal origin ; of adulterants 
and worthless drugs. Practical exercises in identifica- 
tion of pharmaceutical* preparations and chemicals. 

The practical work in pharmacy includes the manufacture of not 
less than two hundred pharmaceutical preparations and the com- 
pounding of not less than fifty prescriptions. 

The work in pharmacognosy includes the study of more than three 
hundred drugs, each of which the student is required to recognize by 
its physical and chemical properties, giving Latin name, common 
name, origin, habitat, constituents, medicinal action and dose 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

REGULATIONS. 

(1) Each student upon entering is required to sign his name in the 
matriculation book, and pledge himself to obey the rules and regula- 
tions of the College. 

(2) Every absence from recitation or examination is graded zero. 

(3) When the term grade of a cadet is lowered by reason of ab- 



* 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



8T 



I 



sence for which a satisfactory excuse can be rendered, a special term 
re-examination may be subsequently granted, and the grade made 
on the special re-examination alone is substituted for that previously 
received. 

(4) Only sickness, as reported by the Surgeon, or being absent by 
reason of family sickness, will constitute a satisfactory excuse for 
granting a re-examination. 

When a cadet is called away from College by his parents his zeros 
for absences are not removed. 

(5) The term grade of a student is the average of his daily ses- 
sional and term examination marks, found by giving due weight to 
the term examination. 

(6) Privates of the senior class in full standing who are candidates 
for graduation maybe excused by the President from all military 
drills, and also students over twenty-one years of age at the time of 
entering College that are permitted to devote their time to on* 
special study, as chemistry, agriculture or pharmacy, provided the 
time devoted to drill is spent by them in laboratory work. 

DISTINCTIONS. 

Distinctions are awarded in the different subjects of each class to 
those students whose grade for the entire year is above ninety per 
cent. 

Certificates of Distinction are awarded in public on commencement 
day to those who obtain an average of 90 per cent, in all the pre- 
scribed studies of a regular class ; and also to those who obtain thi*ee 
distinctions in the freshman class, four in the sophomore class, five 
in the junior class, and six in the senior class, provided they have 
satisfactorily passed all the regular examinations of that session, and 
have not received forty demerits during the year. 

A distinction is not given in the senior class if the average grade in 
any one subject is less than 75 per cent. 

RECORDS AND CIRCULARS. 

Daily records of the various exercises of the classes are kept by the 
officers of instruction. 

, From the records a monthly circular, or statement, is sent to the 
parent or guardian. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Written examinations on the studies of the month are held by each 
professor during the months of October, November, February, and 
April. Each examination occupies one hour. ' 

ACthe end of each term written examinations, or written and oral, 
are-held on the studies passed over during' that term. 

« ; f 






88 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

Special examinations are held only by order of the Faculty, and in 
no case will private examinations be permitted. 

Students falling below the minimum grade at the final examina- 
tions, can be promoted to full standing in the next higher class only 
on satisfactory examinations at the opening of the next session . 

It is required that every student who enters the College shall re- 
main through the examinations at the end of the term. Leaves of 
absence and honorable discharges will, therefore, not be granted 
within three weeks of the examination, except in extreme cases. 

LIBRARY. 

The library occupies an elegant, well-lighted room in the main 
building, and also two smaller adjacent rooms. It contains over 
12,000 bound volumes, including valuable reference and scientific 
books, with select editions of standard authors, and others suitable 
for students, carefully and recently selected. It is kept open eight 
hours daily for the use of students as a reading room, and is thus 
made an important educational feature. 

MUSEUM. 

The museum occupies a large room in the third story. It is pro- 
vided with suitable cases and is equipped with valuable specimens 
and models of an instructive character. 

BOARDING HOUSES. 

For each house an inspector is appointed, whose duty it is to report 
those who, without permission, leave their rooms after "call to quar- 
ters," or are guilty of any violation of order. The report of the in- 
spector is made to the Commandant on alternate days of the week. 

Students, after selecting their boarding-houses, are not permitted 
to make changes without obtaining permission from the President, 
and this permission is given only at the close of a term, except for 
special reasons . 

Permission to board and lodge at separate houses will be granted 
only to seniors, to cadets twety-one years of age and to those who 
are on the " honor roll," except on special conditions. 

By special arrangement with the College authorities, Mrs. M. L. 
Mitchell, Mrs. A. DeBardeleben and Mrs S. M. Anderson, will accom- 
modate students with board, lodging and fuel, for $9.50 per month. 

EXPENSES. 

There is no charge for tuition for a resident of Alabama. 

Incidental fee, per half session $ 2 50 

Library fee, per half session ^ 1 00 

Surgeon's fee, per half session 2 50 

$ 6 00 




^^HH^HHHi 




GENERAL LIBRARY. 




* 






t 



<*> 



tt*~ 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 89 

These fees are payable, $6.00 on matriculation and $6.00 
on February 1st. By order of the Trustees no fees can be 

remitted. , 

For students entering after January 1st, the fees for a 

half session only are required. 

For a non-resident of the State there is a charge for 
tuition of $20.00 per session, payable $10.00 on matricula- 
tion and $10.00 on February 1st, in addition to the semi- 
annual fee of $6.00 payable by all students. 

Board, per month, with fuel and lights. . .$ 12 00 to $15 00 

. 12 00 to 12 00 
rrd;iodgingVfueVand lights: : '. ". . 108 00 to 135 0^ 

Waging • 8(K)t0 1500 

Books, etc., say 

Total ••• • -* 13700 * 1710 ° 

For non-resident students there should be added to the amounts 
.01 non res i fee . g nQt required f 

Z e ™Z™™2::rio matriculated during the se98ion of 

18 Tuiion for students not residents of Alabama is $20.00 per session, 
u Xs! ! remitted by the Trustees to worthy students upon the recom- 

Thtt^roS Sition fee to non-resident students will be 
La Tn the form of a free scholarship for the succeed.ng year, to 
f h "e lo obtaLTdistinction the preceding year, or who, by reaaon 
of merit, are deemed worthy. 

HONOR SCHOLARSHIPS. 

' The following non-resident students were granted each, by reason 
of spec a nTeHt in conduct and scholarship during the sessmn 97-98, 
an tnor scholarship, which exempted from tu.t.on fees: ^^ 

E. Bukof zer Georgia . 

B.B. Hall Georgia. 

J.P.Illges.. ' Georgia. 

M.N. Fleming • • Georgia. 

A. F. Jackson •••• {& 

J. M. McGoolnck ^^ 

J.P.Moore .' Tennessee. 

0. W. Nixon 

9 




: 






90 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

uniform. 

A uniform of cadet gray cloth is prescribed, which all under- 
graduate students are required to wear during the session. The 
uniforms are made, by a contractor, of excellent cloth manufactured 
at the Chadottsville mill This suit, including cap, costs at present 
about 114.00 It is neat and serviceable, and less expensive than 
ordinary clothing. 

CONTINGENT FEE. 

A contingent fee of five dollars is required to be deposited by each 
student on matriculation, to cover any special or general damage to 
college property for which he may be liable. 

At the close of the session the whole of the contingent fee, or the 
unexpended balance, is refunded to the student. 

AMOUNT OF DEPOSIT. 
Fees to be paid on entrance : 
Incidental fee , ,.,... .. |250 

Surgeon 250 

Contingent fee • 5 00 

Uniform "".■.■.■.'.'.".'.".'.'.'.::::::: u<» 

Tll ; f - .j $25 00 $25 00 

luition, non-resident .. T~ rJJ 

«plO 00 



eno S to „ I T T StUdent Sh ° Uld d6p0Sit With the T ~'« 
to «J to m * u • ° n l m0nth ' S b ° al-d ' incid entals, amounting 

fcasLtf 'Z » ' a re ?l dent ° f AUbama 8h0 «ld deposit with the 

Jieasuier sfoO.Ot), a non-resident, $60.00. 

FUNDS OF STUDENTS. 
Parents and guardians are advised to deposit with the Treasurer 
of the College a.Uunds desired for sons or wards, whether for regu 

ar charges of college fees or board, or for any other purpose It is 
the du t y of th j ffioer to keep ^ [a J g PU pose It £ 

and to pay all expenses incurred by the students, including Sard' 
uniform, books, etc., when approved ooara, 

When funds are deposited, checks are drawn on the Treasurer of 
the College by the cadet to pay his necessary expenes These 
checks are paid only when officially approved The approval' is lien 
only for necessary expenses, as stated in the catalogue, unTels snedan v 
requested in writing by the parent. specially 

The College cannot be held responsible for the exnensp. „t 
dent, unless the funds are deposited with the KeZr^Z^l 




N 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



91 



should be permitted to have a large amount of pocket money, as it 
brings only trouble and encourages idleness. 

THESIS. 

Each applicant for a degree is required to write and submit to the 
Faculty an essay or oration and read and deliver the same at com- 
mencement, if required by the Faculty. 

It must be given to the Professor of English by the first of April. 

The subject must be submitted for approval by January 1st. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are two literary societies connected with the 

College the Wirt and the Websterian. Each has a hall 

in the main building. 

These societies hold celebrations on the evenings of 
Thanksgiving Day and 22nd of February. They elect 
annually, with the approval of the Faculty, an orator to 
represent them at the close of the year. 

EXERCISES IN ELOCUTION. . 

i 
On every Saturday morning, immediately after chapel services, 
oratorical exercises in declamation and in origmal orations are con- 
ducted by the Professor of English, in the presence of the Faculty 

and students. 

The first and second terms the students of the junior and sophomore 
classes are exercised in original orations and declamation. 

The second and third terms the members of the senior class read 

essays or deliver original orations. 

I 

SOCIETY OF THE ALUMNI. 

In 1885, the Alumni Society established "The Alumni 
Scholarship," which makes an annual loan of one hun- 
dred and seventy dollars to a beneficiary elected by the 
society. Eight young men have been thus enabled to 
go through College. This scholarship is supported by 
annual contributions from the Alumni and other friends 
of the institution. 

Subscriptions should be sent to B. H. Crenshaw, 
Treasurer, Auburn, Ala. 

The annual alumni oration is delivered toy a member 
10 



' '-■=■ 4 /* 






92 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 






. 



of the society, in Langdon Hall, on Alumni Day, Tues- 
day of commencement week. 

The following are officers of the society. 

Wm. H. Blake, of '92, M. D., President. 

C. L. Hare, " '94, Vice President. 

H. H. Smith, " '95, Secretary. 

B. H. Crenshaw, '89, Treasurer. 

T. H. Samford, '88, Orator for 1899. 

SURGEON. 

The Surgeon is required to be present at the College 
daily, to visit at their quarters the cadets that are re- 
ported sick, and to give all requisite jrfedical attention 
without other charge than the regular surgeon's fee, 
paid on entering college. 

ACADEMIC YEAR. 

The academic year for 1899-1900 commences on 
Wednesday, 13th September, 1899 (second Wednesday 
after the first Monday), and ends on Wednesday, 13th 
June, 1900 (second Wednesday after the first Monday) , 
which is commencement day. 

It is divided into three terms. The first term extends 
from the opening of the session to the 22nd of Decem- 
ber ; the second term begins January 2nd, and ends 
March 18th ; the third term continues to the close of the 
session. 

AN ACT OF THE LEGISLATURE 

To change the name of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of 

Alabama. 

Whereas, the Agricultural and^echanical College at Auburn hav- 
ing by means of the appropriations made by the State legislature, and 
by those made and continued in recent years by the acts of Congress, 
developed, as originally designed, into an institution where are taught 
not only the branches that relate to agriculture and the mechanic 
arts but also the sciences and arts in general that relate to the in- 
dustrial development of modern civilization, therefore • 






I 






*"■-'-_ ,'**«- 



Alabama Polytecanic Institute. 



93 






I 
I 



Section 1. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of Alabama, That 
said institution shall hereafter be known and designated as The Ala- 
bama Polytechnic Institute, it being provided that said Institute shall 
continue to perform the functions of the State college for the benefit 
of agriculture and the mechanic arts, in accordance with the pro- 
visions of the Acts of Congress of July 2, 1862, granting lands to the 
several States and territories for collegiate purposes. 

Approved January 27, 1899. 

(Official) Kobt. P. McDavid, 

Secretary of State. 

DONATIONS TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL 

ENGINEERING. 

General Electric -Co . , Harrison, N. J., case of incandescent lamps. 

S. C. Shaffner, Mobile, Ala., two arc lamps. 

W. H. McBryde, New York, N. Y., one magnetic lamp socket. 

DONATIONS TO THE DEPARTMENT OF sMECHANICAL 
ENGINEERING FOR THE YEAR 1898-99. 

Samples of Lathe and Planer Tools, donated by Armstrong Brothers 

Tool Co., Chicago, 111. 

Set of Castings and blue prints for complete Corliss valve gear, 
adapted to the Harris-Corliss engine in the shop, donated by The 
Edwin P. Allis Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Samples of Finch Automatic oil cups, donated t^eorge L. Thomp- 
son Manufacturing Co., Chicago, 111. 

Samples of Copper Gaskets, donated by The United States Mineral 

Wool Co., New York, N. Y. 

DONATIONS TO THE GENERAL LIBRARY. 

To the General Library, 12 vols. 
Pamphlets, etc., 36 vols. 
Government publications, 195 vols. 

TO THE EXPERIMENT STATION LIBRARY. 

Scientific papers and pamphlets, 63. 

Bound volumes by Prof. C. F. Baker, 67. 

Pamphlets by Prof. C. F. Baker, 143. 

There are 56 scientific and literary journals regularly received in 
the general library, and 38 foreign journals and 26 American in the 
Experiment Station library, all of which are accessible to the stu- 
dents. 



Addenda to List of Students, 
Lynn Mathewis Boyd 



Macon. 



2078SS 




i — sr*- 



\ 



' ■■: 








■ 



! 

j i Cjaxflord 



PAM PHLET BINDER 

■ Syracuse, N. Y. 
—— • Stockton, Calif. 



<r 






^ 



Catalogue of the Alabama 
Polytechnic Institute 



:•* 



1899 



t 



OCLC: 36819614 
Entered: 19970429 



Type 


: a 




BLvl 


s s 




S/L: 







Desc 


t a 




1 


040 




2 


007 




3 


043 




4 


090 




5 


090 




6 


049 




7 


110 


2 


8 


245 


10 


9 


246 


10 


10 


260 




11 


300 




12 


310 




13 


3*2 





14 


515 




15 


500 




16 


533 





*d 1997. *c 

17 539 

18 610 20 





Rec stat: 


n 








Replaced: 


19970429 


Used: 


19970429 


I 


Srce: d 


GPub : s 


Ctrl : 


Lang: eng 


a 


Conf : 


Freq: a 


MRec : 


Ctry: alu 




EntW: 


Regl: r 


ISSN: 


Alph : a 




Cont: 


DtSt : d 


Dates: 1894, 


,1899 I 



f *f u *g b *h a *i u *j p 1 



ELvl: 
Form: 
Orig: 
SrTp: 

AAA *c AAA I 
h *b c *d b *e 
n-us-al 1 
LD271 .A76 1 
*b I 
AAAA 1 

Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama, f 
Catalogue of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute *h [microform] I 
Catalog of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute 1 
Auburn, Ala. : *b The College, *c 1894-1899. I 
6 v. : *b ill. ; *c 23 cm. I 
Annual 1 

1893-94-1898-99. I 

Issue for 1898-99 carries designation 1899-1900. 1 
"State Agricultural and Mechanical College." I 

Microfilm. *m 1894-1899. *b Mobile, Ala. *c Document Technology, 
microfilm reels : negative ; 35 mm. I 
d *b 1894 *c 1899 *d alu *e u *f u *g a I 
Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama *x Curricula *x 



Periodicals • I 

19 780 00 Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. *t Catalogue of 
he State Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama 1 

20 785 00 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. *t Catalogue of the Alabama 
Polytechnic Institute I 

► 21 830 USAIN State and Local Literature Preservation Project I 



AUBURN UNIVERSITY 
LIBRARY 







271 



1 



poo/cC 



c.2 




a 



T 



mm 



"\ 



^ 



^^^■M 



PP 



~^i 



f -7 



st r~ 






. 



/ r 



* - 



**) * ' ' w : ' 






fi-.if 



■ 



8. 



lO* 



#> e 



$> 



<& 



CAT .2- 



^■^ 



^P^^rpr^\ jJT*>// 



K J2 



Polytechnic Institute. . 



— 




■m&t** 



.- ""', ^2 



-' - ' 



^^ 



7 



CATALOGUE 



j 



OF THE 







i 



■TV- 





ill 



natitate 



STATE COLLEGE, 



FOR THE 



Benefit of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts. 




AUBURN, ALABAMA. 



1900. 



MONTGOMERY, ALA. 

BROWN VlilNTING CO., PRINTERS AND BINDERS. 

1900. 



TRUSTEES. 



♦■♦ 



His Excellency, JOSEPH F. JOHNSTON", President. .Ex-officio. 

JOHN W. ABERCROMBIE, Superintendent of Education. .Ex-officio. 



F. M. Moselry, (term expires 1905) Union Springs. 

W. K. Terry, . . . . (term expires 1905) Birmingham. 

T. H. Frazer, (term expires 1905) Mobile. 

N. P. Renpro, (term expires 1905) Opelika. * 



J. G. Gilchrist, (term expires 1903). . Hope Hull. 

Tancred Bbtts, (term expires 1903) Huntsville. 

Walter O. Whttaker,. (term expires 1903) Tuscaloosa. 



Jonathan Haralson,. ...(term expires 1901) Selma. 

Thos. Williams......... (term expires 1901) Wetumpka 

J. A. Bilbro, (term expires 1901) Gadsden. 



E T. Glenn, Treasurer. 
J. H. Drake, M. D., Surgeon. 

R. W. Burton, Secretary. 



WW-* , w 



FACULTY AND OFFICERS. 

Wm. LeROY BROUN, M. A., LL. D., 
President and Professor of Physics and Astronomy. 

OTIS DAVID SMITH, A. M., LL. D., 
Professor of Mathematics. 

PATRICK HUGHES MELL, M. E., Ph D., 
Professor of Botany and Geology. 

JAMES HENRY LANE, C. E., A. M., Ph. D., LL. D., 
Professor of Civil Engineering and Drawing. 

CHARLES COLEMAN THACH, A. M., 
Professor of English and Political Economy. 

GEORGE PETRIE, M. A., Ph. D., 
Professor of History and Latin. 

BENNETT BATTLE ROSS, M. So., 
Professor of General and Agricultural Chemistry and State Chemist. 

* CHARLES HUNTER ROSS, C. E., Ph. D., 
Professor of Modern Languages. 

JOHN JENKINS WILMORE, M. E., 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director of Laboratory. 

CHARLES ALLEN CARY, B. Sc, D. V. M., 
Professor of Physology and Veterinary Science. 

EMERSON R. MILLER, Phae. M., M. Sc, 
Professor of Pharmacy. 

JOHN FREDERICK DUGGAR, M., So., 
Professor of Agriculture. 

FRANK SUMNER EARLE. 
Professor of Biology and Horticulture. 

ARTHUR ST. CHARLES DUNSTAN, M. E., C. E., 
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Physics. 

BOLLING HALL CRENSHAW, M. E., 
Assistant Professor of Mechanic Arts and Mathematics. 

BENJAMIN SWEAT PATRICK, E. & M. E., 
Commandant add Acting Professor of Military Science. 

• Deceased. J 



207883 



r 



v 










THOMAS GREEN FAULKNER, M. A., 
Acting Professor Modern Languages. 

CLIFFORD LeROY HARE, M. Sc, 
Instructor Chemical Laboratory. 

ROBERT JEFFERSON TRAMMELL, C. E., 
Instructor in Mechanic Arts. 

HENRY HEARST KYSER, E. & M. E., 
Instructor in Physical and Electrical Laboratory. 

WALTER LYNWOOD FLEMING, M. Sc, 
Assistant Librarian. 

MICHAEL THOMAS FULLAN, M. Sc., 
Assistant in Mechanics Arts. 

ROBERT HIGGINS ADAMS, B. Sc, 
Assistant in English and Mathematics. 

WILLIAM OSCAR SCROGGS, B. Sc, 

Assistant in English. 

♦ARTHUR McBRYDE RANSOM, M. Sc, 
Assistant in Chemistry. 

ISHAM FENNELL McDONNELL, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Electrical Engineering. 

THOMAS HENNINGTON McADORY, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Mechanic Arts. 

.ARTHUR HENRY FEAGIN, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Civil Engineering and Drawing. 

t HARRY STREETY HOUGHTON, B. Sc., 
Assistant in Chemistry. 

BAILEY EDGAR BROWN, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Veterinary Science. 

C. C. THACH, 
Superintendent of Library. 

0. D. SMITH, 
Corresponding Secretary. 

* Resigned. 

t Appointed Feb. 15th. 



OFFICERS. 



OP THE 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. 



IP 



COMMITTEE OF TRUSTEES ON EXPERIMENT STATION. 

F. M. Moseley Union Springs. 

J. G. Gilchrist. Hope Hull. 

Jonathan Haralson Selma. 

STATION COUNCIL. 

Wir. LeRoy Broun President. 

P. H. Mell Director and Botanist. 

B. B. Ross .Chemist. 

C. A. Cary, D. V. M Veterinarian. 

J. F. Duggar Agriculturist. 

F. S. Earle Biologist and Horticulturist. 

J. T. Anderson Associate Chemist. 

ASSISTANTS. 

C. L. Hare First Assistant Chemist. 

J. Q. Burton Second Assistant Chemist. 

* H. S. Houghton Third Assistant Chemist. 

T. U. Culver Superintendent of Farm. 

R. W. Clark Assistant Agriculturist. 

Moses Craig Assistant Horticulturist. 



* 



Appointed Feb. 15, vice A. McB. Ransom, resigned. 



1 1 



^ 



i 



<i 




LANGDON HALL. 



' 



The Institute is a distinctive school of Science and 
its applications; being also the State College for the 
benefit of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts established 
by the State in 1872, by endowing it with the land-grant 
appropriation made by the U. S. Congress in 1862. 

The leading object of the Institute, in conformity with 
the act of Congress and the acts of the State Legislature, 
is to teach the principles and applications of science. 

In its course of instruction it gives prominence to the 
sciences and their applications, especially to those that 
relate to agriculture and the mechanic, arts ; and at the 
same time the discipline and liberal education obtained 
by the study of language and other sciences are not neg- 
lected. 

All students are required to study the English lan- 
guage. The Latin, French and German languages are 
also taught, and opportunity for their study is offered to 
students in any course. 

The special and technical instruction given is thus 
based on a sound, general education. 

In its different courses of education, work of great 
value to the youth of the State is accomplished by fitting 
them by a thorough science-discipline, in which manual 
training in the lower classes is made a prominent feature 
for the successful and honorable performance of the 
responsible duties of life. 

While every attention is given to the mental discipline 
of the students in endeavoring to train them to habits 
of accurate scientific thought, and thus to qualify them 
for the duties of life, their moral and Christian training 
will always constitute the prominent care and thought 
of the Faculty. The Institute thus endeavors to educate 
as well as instruct, to form character as well as give in- 
formation of value. 



* 



8 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

LABORATORIES AND FACILITIES FOR IN- 
STRUCTION. '* 

The Institute now possesses facilities for giving 
laboratory instruction in applied science in the follow- 
ing departments : 

I — IN AGRICULTURE AND HORTICULTURE. 

The farm contains 304 acres, and is supplied with 
illustrative specimens of stock of select varieties. 

The agricultural experiment station, established in 
connection with the College, where experiments and 
scientific investigations relating to agriculture are daily 
made, affords unusual opportunities to students to be- 
come familiar with agriculture, its defects and remedies. 

The students of agriculture accompany the professor 
in the field, garden, conservatory, stock-yard, etc., where 
lectures are delivered in the presence of the objects dis- 
cussed, and during the year exercises in practical agri- 
culture of an educational character are given the stu- 
dents who entered upon this course of study. 

II — IN MECHANIC ARTS. 

The laboratory of mechanic arts is used as an aux- 
iliary in industrial education, and as a school of manual 
training in the arts that constitute the foundation of 
various industrial pursuits. The work performed by the 
students is instructive in character, as in any other 
laboratory, and the classes are taught in sections by a 
series of graded lessons under the supervision of the 
professor. In the lower classes of the Institute each stu- 
dent enters this school and is assigned three exercises a 
week, each exercise being two hours long. 

The object of this laboratory is not to teach a trade, ^ 
but to educate, to discipline and train the eye and the I* 
hand, as well as the mind, and thus by associating 



' 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 9 

manual and mental training, to educate thoroughly the 
student for the duties of life, Avhatever may be his voca- 
tion. There is no attempt to teach students special skill 
in constructing articles of commercial value, but all the 
exercises are systematically arranged and designed for 
purposes of education. 

The wood department is located in a commodious hall, 
90x50 feet, and is provided with a twenty-five horse- 
power Corliss engine, a planer, circular saw, band-saw, 
two scroll says, a buzz planer, a pattern maker's lathe, 
twenty-four stands, each with a lathe and a full set of 
tools, and thirty benches for carpenter work with the 
tools requisite for construction. 

A brick building, 30x87 feet, with two rooms, has been 
constructed especially for instruction in working iron. 

One room is equipped with sixteen forges and tools 
required for a forge department, and the other with a 
Colliau cupola furnace, a core oven, a brass furnace, 
molding benches, foundry crane constructed by students, 
and special tools for use in a foundry. 

The forge and foundry rooms are furnished with a 
Sturtevant fan and exhauster, supplied with power from 
a ten-horse power engine, constructed by the students 
in mechanic arts. 

The machine department occupies a brick building, 
30x50 feet, and is equipped with ten engine lathes, one 
speed lathe, one 20-inch drill press, one 10-inch sensitive 
drill, one post drill, one 16-inch shaper, one 5-foot 
planer, one universal milling machine, a corundum tool 
grinder, a small emery grinder, a universal cutter and 
reamer grinder, a No. 1 Brown & Sharpe universal grind- 
ing machine, and a power hack saw. 

The chipping and filing department is arranged with 
benches, vises and tools for twelve students. 

The tool room is well supplied with special tools for 
use in instruction, including a machine for grinding 
twist drills. The rooms are lighted with electricity 
whenever necessary. 
3 



■ ■ I w 



<0 

10 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

Ill — IN PRACTICAL CHEMISTRY. 

The chemical laboratory is supplied with modern ap- 
paratus, and in its equipment affords excellent facilities 
for instruction in practical chemistry and for investiga- 
tion. 

The investigations that are undertaken in this labora- 
tory by scientific experts, in connection with the work 
of the agricultural experiment station, are of especial 
value to advanced students, and afford them unusual 
opportunities to learn the methods of scientific research. 
The building contains a large general laboratory that 
accommodates sixty students, a lecture room with a 
capacity for one hundred seats, and nine other , rooms, 
all appropriated to instruction and research in chem- 
istry. 

IV — IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

The electrical laboratory is well supplied with modern *j 

appliances for instruction in electrical engineering. It 
occupies three large rooms in the basement and is 
equipped with many fine instruments of precision. 

In addition to resistance boxes, bridges, condensers, 
galvanometers, dynamometers, wattmeters, and other 
laboratory instruments, the department is supplied with 
representatives of the best types of commercial electrical 
instruments from foreign and domestic makers. 

The dynamos occupy a separate building and are oper- 
ated by a twenty-five horse power Atlas engine, and a 
thirty-five horse power Westinghouse engine. In this 
building are installed the following dynamos : 

Edison compound 12 Kilo-watt generator, Thomson- 
Houston 150 light 110 volt dynamo, Weston 150 volt 25 
ampere generator, Crocker- Wheeler one horse power 
motor, Ideal 3 phase alternator, Brush 6 arc light dy- 
namo with lamps, two Baxter street car motors, 20 horse 
power eagh (so connected as to be used as direct or alter- 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 11 

nating current motors or generators), one 5 horse power 
three phase motor, one General Electric 20 horse power 
motor, one 40 light shunt dynamo, one Edison 3 Kilo- 
watt generator, one Stanley induction motor with con- 
denser, two bi-phase induction motors (built by stu- 
dents), one 9 light Thomson-Houston arc machine, two 
phase alternator and 500 volt 20 ampere generator, made 
by students. There is also in connection with this de- 
partment at the experiment station, a ten horse power 
motor, made by students, which is operated by the 500 
volt generator in the dynamo room. 

v — IN PHYSICS. 



In the College building provision is made for elemen- 
tary laboratory work in the department of physics. 
Special rooms are appropriated for this purpose, and 
are equipped with the necessary appliances for instruc- 
tion in practical physics. 



VI — IN MINERALOGY. 

This laboratory occupies a convenient room in the 
basement, and is provided with tables and appliances to 
accommodate thirty students, with an excellent collec- 
tion of minerals. 

VII — IN BOTANY. 

In the work of the agricultural experiment station 
there is a botanical garden under the charge of the pro- 
fessor of botany; investigations in botany are given 
special attention, and opportunities are offered ad- 
vanced students for practical work in a laboratory es- 
pecially fitted with microscop.es, tables, a dark room for 
photographic work, and appliances needed for instruc- 
tion and research. This department is provided, with 
Auzoux's clastic models of seeds and flowers for teach- 
ing botany. 



ft 



12 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



viii — IN BIOLOGY. 

The laboratory in this department adjoins the lecture 
room of the professor, and is furnished with tables, ex- 
cellent microscopes and appliances for investigation. 
Each student of the class works under the supervision of 
the professor. 

IX — IN ENGINEERING AND SURVEYING. 

The necessary apparatus for field work, including 
transits, levels, plane table, models of bridges ,etc, is 
provided for the use of the students, and the customary 
exercises in the field are given. 

X — IN DRAWING. 

All students in the lower classes are required to take 
drawing, a study which tends to discipline the mind, as 
well as to train the eye and hand to accuracy of observa- 
tion and execution. A large, well-lighted drawing room, 
which will accommodate fifty students, is provided with 
tables, lock-boxes, etc. 

XI — IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

The mechanical course has been extended to include 
experimental work in mechanical engineering. 

The apparatus available for this instruction is as fol- 
lows : A 45 horse power Imperial Cross compound en- 
gine, especially arranged for experimental work, sup- 
plied with Wheeler surface condenser and Deane air 
pump and circulating pump, a 25-horse power Harris- 
Corliss engine, a 35 horse power Westinghouse engine, 
two 9 horse power engines constructed by students, the 
boilers belonging to the regular power plant, a small en- 
gine and boiled for the special purpose of making effi- 
ciency tests, a Deane duplex steam pump, a 4-horse power 
gasoline engine, an Ericsson hot air engine, a New York 
air pump, a Westinghouse air pump, four steam engine 
indicators, a separating calorimeter, thermometers, a 
pyrometer, scales, a standard steam gauge with appar- 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



13 



atus for testing steam gauges, a Crosby dead weight 
tester with weights for correcting the standard gauge, 
a 35,000-pound testing machine, a Henning micrometer 
extensometer, and a Carpenter calorimeter with the nec- 
essary auxiliary apparatus for determining the heating 
value of different kinds of coal. 

This work is now carried on in the lower story of the 
annex to the chemical laboratory. This room is 30x60 
feet in size and was specially designed and fitted up 
for this purpose. A three-inch steam main has been laid 
from the boiler house, thus securing a steam supply in 
the building for all work requiring it. The work is thor- 
oughly practical, and it is desired to extendit as rapidly 
as the funds available for the purchase of apparatus will 
allow. 



XII — IN PHYSIOLOGY AND VETERINARY SCIENCE. 

There has been constructed for the veterinary depart- 
ment a new and separate two-story building with nine 
rooms. It is provided with lecture room, office, working 
and operating rooms for clinical practice, and museum 
with skeletons of the domestic animals for instruction. 
Free clinics are given every Saturday for the benefit of 
the students in veterinary science. 

XIII — IN PHARMACY. 

The laboratory of this department occupies the second 
lioor of the annex to chemical laboratory, and is pro- 
vided with a sufficient supply of drugs and apparatus 
necessary for instruction in. pharmaceutical prepara- 
tions. 

The students work in the laboratory with the profes- 
sor, from five to eight hours, six days in the week. 

The facilities are increased as means are available. 



14 Alabama Polytechnic Institute). 

military tactics. 

Instruction in this department is given in conformity 
with the act of Congress. Students receive the benefit of 
regular military drill, and in addition the military sys- 
tem is used as a means of enforcing discipline and secur- 
ing good order, promptness and regularity in the per- 
formance of academic duties. 

This department is supplied with cadet muskets and 

accoutrements for the corps. 








COLLEGE BUILDINGS. 

The frontispiece is a representation of the main College building. 
It is 160 x 71 feet and contains forty-five rooms. This building is 
not used for dormitories for students, but is appropriated to pur- 
poses of instruction and investigation. 

It contains the lecture rooms and offices of the professors, labora- 
tories, library, museum, armory, etc. 

LANGDON HALL. 

This is a two-story building, 90x50 feet. The second story is the 
audience hall, used for commencement and qther public occasions. 
The first story is appropriated to the laboratory of mechanic arts. 

THE CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

As shown on the opposite page this is a two story structure, 40 by 
60 feet, with a rear projection, 35 by 60 feet, of one-story and base- 
ment, and contains eight rooms. The exterior is of pressed brick, 
with cut stone trimmings and terra cotta ornamentation. 

In the basement are ample accommodations for assaying and 
storage. 

The main laboratory will accommodate sixty students, and con- 
tains improved working tables, with water, gas and every necessary 
appliance for chemical work. 

The second story contains a lecture room with seats and tablets 
for eighty students. Around the lecture :room are cases containing 
crude and manufactured products, illustrating agricultural and 
mechanical chemistry, prominent subjects taught in the institution. 

ANNEX TO CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

This is a three-story brick building, containing rooms for phar- 
macy, mechanical engineering, and drawing. 

The Chemical Laboratory for the Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion occupies a building 60 by 26 feet and is appropriated exclusively 
for chemical investigation and research, and not for instruction. 




CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 



N 



* 



', 






GRADUATES IN 1899. 



CLASS OF 1899. 



HONOR GRADUATES. 

COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 

Flake Earle Farley Lee. 

COURSE IN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

Jones Stephen Gilliland Coosa. 

COURSE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

Arthur Henry Feagin . . . . Bullock. 

GENERAL COURSE. 

William Oscar Scroggs Georgia. 

1 

COURSE IN PHARMACY. 

Dozier Turner. Elmore. 

DEGREES. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. 

xjcxvoy j cimes aiich . ....... ..*.*...... ........ ••<..••••• .JMari 

Jesse Maldrie Atkinson 

Emmett Gale Buck 

Alston Boyd Tennessee. 

Harriet Lavinia Dabney Bondurant Lee. 

Bailey Edgar Brown Morgan. 

Mattie Lucile Burton , Lee. 

Thomas Greene Bush Calhoun. 

Charles Wallace Collins Hale. 

Colonel Seldon Crew Coosa. 

Frederick Robert Daly Jefferson. 

Bolivar Davis Jefferson. 

Marion Dawson Elmore. 

James Francis Dobbin Florida. 

Arthur Henry Feagin .Bullock. 

Michael Thomas Fullan Georgia. 

Jones Stephens Gilliland Coosa. 

Theophilus Eaton Goodwin Crenshaw. 

Fannie Maud Holstun 










p3 



9 *. 






1 






16 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

Felix Grundy Horn. Sumter. 

Kate Meade Lane Lee. 

Harry Toulmin Lay Montgomery. 

Thomas Hennington McAdory Jefferson. 

Isham Fennell McDonnell ....Madison. 

Jackson Chadwick Minge Marengo. 

Benjamin Otey Minge Marengo. 

Hartley Allen Moon Coosa. 

Hattie Marshall Phelps Lee. 

Mary Evelyn Robinson Lee. 

John Osgood Rush Autauga. 

William Oscar Scroggs Georgia. 

Joseph Wilson Sutcliffe Louisiana. 

Dozier Turner Elmore. 

James Alfred Ward Madison. 

Thomas William Wert Morgan. 

George Madison Wheeler Madison. 

ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEER. 

Michael Thomas Fullan Georgia; 

Jonathan Haralson Dallas. 

Ashleigh Strudwick Moses Baldwin. 

George Wrigley Georgia. 

MINING ENGINEER. .... 

George Nathan Mitcham. Georgia. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE. 

Erin Black Lee. 

Mary Wright Boyd Lee. 

Alexander Humphreys Clark Montgomery. 

Joseph Wood King Georgia. 

Frank Greene Morriss Talladega. 

Arthur McBride Ransom Georgia. 

PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMIST. 

John Wesley Williams Lee. 



o^> 



T 



DISTINGUISHED STUDENTS. 



Students who receive a grade above 90 in three studies in the fresh- 
man class, in four in the Sophomore, in five in the 
Junior, and in six in the Senior, are dis- 
guished for excellence in scholar- 
ship, and are awarded 

HONOR CERTIFICATES. 

The following students received honor certificates in 1899: 

SENIOR CLASS 

Bailey Edgar Brown Morgan. 

Mattie Lucile Burton Lee. 

Charles Wallace Collins. , .Hale. 

Flake Earle Farley Lee. 

Arthur Henry Feagin ; Bullock. 

Jones Stephen Gilliland Coosa. 

Kate Meade Lane Lee. 

Isham Fennell McDonnell Madison. 

Hattie Marshall Phelps ! Lee. 

Mary Evelyn Robinson Lee. 

William Oscar Scroggs Georgia. 

Dozier Turner Elmore. 

HONOR STUDENTS IN THE JUNIOR CLASS, 

COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE 

Luther Noble Duncan Franklin. 

COURSE IN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

Roland B. Hall. ; Georgia. 

GENERAL COURSE. 

James Richard Rutland .Chambers. 

COURSE IN PHARMACY. 

Enoch Marvin Mason Lee. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Malcolm Alfred Beeson Etowah. 

John Samuel Black Lee. 

Jesse Wright Boyd Lee. 

Millard Morse Brooks.' Escambia. 



18 Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 

Edwin Bukofzer. » .Tennessee. 

Emma Beall Culver. . Lee. 

William Crawford Dowdell Lee. 

Luther Noble Duncan Franklin. 

Sherman Guy Forbes. ... Dale. 

Bertha Mae Grout Lee. 

Harry Young Hall . Jefferson. 

Roland B. Hall Georgia. 

Charles Lewis Harold Escambia, 

Edward Zellars Heard Lee. 

Mary Katherine Hollifield Lee. 

Moses Frank Kahn .Lee. 

Enoch Marvin Mason ., Lee. 

William Livingston Neill Jefferson. 

Charles Walter Nixon Tennessee. 

William Forney Osburn Lee. 

Hiram Perry Powell ". Georgia. 

Fleming James Rigney .Madison. 

James Richard Rutland Chambers. 

Joseph Manning Steiner Butler. 

• 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Eugene Flynn Enslen. Jefferson. 

John Drewry Foy Barbour. 

Paul Shields Haley Walker. 

Arthur Flournoy Jackson Georgia. 

Myron Daniel Kahn Lee. 

Howard Malcolm Kilpatrick Georgia. 

Karl Edward Lindrose Mississippi. 

Abram Hill Mitchell Lee. 

Isaac Lenoir Moore Lee. 

Henry Edward Werner Texas. 

Gaius Whitfield , Marengo. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Oliver Hannibal Alford Marshall. 

William Warren Askew Georgia. 

Clyde Allen Collins Hale. 

Jesse Duncan Elliott Wyoming. 

Morris Ketchum Florida. 

James Allen Kyser \ %% Dallas. 

Henry Bigham Park Georgia. 

Richard Blount Shepard \ Mobile. 

Jonathan Render Thomas Lee. 

Walker Dorr Willis Florida. 

John Eyers Davis Yonge Florida. 






CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS, 



FOR THE SESSION OF 1899-1900. 
/ 

Graduate Students. 

[Residence in Alabama when Slate is not given.] * 

NAME. RESIDENCE. 

Robert Higgins Adams Pike. 

Bailey Edgar Brown . . . . Morgan. 

Toccoa Cozart Montgomery. 

George Webster Duncan Lee. 

Arthur Henry Feagin Barbour. 

Kate Meade Lane Lee. 

Richard Harris Little Tuskaloosa. 

Thomas Hennington McAdory Jefferson. 

Isham Fennell McDonnell Madison. 

Julian Berry Oglesby Georgia. 

William Oscar Scroggs .Georgia. 

Undergraduate Students. 

senior class. 

Frank Hunter Anderson Bullock. 

William Lawrence Anderson. Montgomery. 

Fletcher Ashcraft Lauderdale. 

Malcolm Alfred Beeson .Etowah. 

John Samuel Black Lee. 

Guv French Bovd Lee. 

Jesse Wright Boyd Lee. 

Millard Morse Brooks Escambia. 

Edwin Bukofzer Tennessee. 

Judson Lamar Burke Lee. 

Andrew Crozier Cameron Jefferson. 



s 



J 



o-» 



(: 



20 Alabama P6lytechnic Institute. 

Frank Bovard Chapman Louisiana. 

Sallie McGehee Clark , .Montgomery. 

Asburv Nicholson Culver Lee. 

Emma Beall Culver Lee. 

William Crawford Dowdell .Lee. 

Ellis Madison Duncan Franklin. 

Luther Noble Duncan Franklin. 

Rutherford Sylvanus Finch Montgomery. 

John Jefferson Flowers Butler. 

Sherman Guy Forbes Dale. 

Erie Humphreys Foy Barbour. 

Bertha Mae Grout Lee. 

Roland B. Hall Georgia. 

Harry Young Hall .. Jefferson. 

Charles Lewis Harold Escambia. 

Edward Zellars Heard Lee. 

Mabel Heard Lee. 

Mary Katherine Hollifleld. Lee. 

George Martin Illges Montgomery. \ 

John Paul Illges , Georgia. 

John William Jepson South Carolina. 

Walter Eldrade Johnson Madison. 

Moses Frank Kahn Lee. 

Wilbur Edrald Kelley. . . . . . ( .Jefferson. 

Henry Deas Lesesne. Mobile. 

John Maples. Eussell. 

William Christopher Martin Barbour. 

Enoch Marvin Mason Lee. 

James Hardie McGehee Montgomery. 

Kenneth Bethune McKenzie Butler. 

Graham Edwin Merchant Lee. 

Edward Andrew Miller. . . Marshall. 

William Livingston Neill Jefferson. 

Charles Wellington Nixon Tennessee. 

William Forney Osburn .Lee. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 21 

Hiram Perry Powell Georgia. 

Fleming James Rigney Madison. 

James Richard Rutland Chambers. 

William Stowe Rutledge Lee. 

Frederick Blount Shepard Mobile. 

Mary Robbins Sampey. Conecuh. 

John Winfred Shuff . . Talladega. 

Joseph Manning Steiner Butler. 

Horace Ware Calhoun. 

Moses Conrad Wright. .Macon. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Robert Tanner Arnold . .Florida. 

Berschall Winston Bass St. Clair. 

Frank Carlisle Bivings Georgia. 

j- Kenneth Bradford Montgomery. 

Thomas Bragg. .• Lee. 

Samuel Hamner Browne .Tuskaloosa. 

Salmon Holmes Burns Lee. 

John Isham Dorsey Lee. 

William Hamilton Eagar Winston. 

Eugene Flynn Enslen .Jefferson. 

LeRov Madison Felton South Carolina. 

John Drewry Foy Barbour. 

William Alexander Frazer (c) Lee. 

James Olney Goggans Tallapoosa. 

Walter Lee Greene Lee. 

William Hope Haigler Montgomery. 

Paul Shields Haley Walker. 

«- Leslie Murphy Hand Sumter. 

Alexander Cameron Hannon Montgomery. 

Michael Smith Harvey (c) . .- Lee. 

Charles Henry Haynes Bullock. 

Daniel Hagood Haynes Dallas. 

— James Kelly Haynie. Montgomery. 

(c) Conditioned. 




22 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

Arber Samuel Hertz Georgia. 

Robert Holland Hood Jefferson. 

Artbur Flournoy Jackson Georgia. 

James Baxter Jackson Lee. 

Jefferson Franklin Jones. Sumter. 

Myron Daniel Kahn *. Lee. 

Claude Kauffman Mobile. 

Emmett Stephens Killebrew. Dale. 

William Reid Lancaster Lee. 

John Talbert Letcher Macon. 

Karl Edward Lindrose Mississippi. 

Daniel Stacy Martin Barbour. 

^Walter Deems McCrary Lee. 

""William Boyd McGehee Montgomery. 

Benjamin Baldwin Meriwether. Montgomery. 

Abram Hill Mitchell .Lee. 

Isaac Lenoir Moore Lee. 

Merrill Hastings Moore Montgomery. 

William Louis Noll. Tennessee. 

Dorsey Julian Parker Escambia. 

James Cochran Phelps Lee. 

James Blackmon Powell Bullock. 

Shepherd Harrison Roberts ...Montgomery. 

~Oscar Menderson Schloss Morgan. 

Lyman Hall Shaw .Sumter. 

Henry Alexander Skeggs Morgan. 

John Hunt Skeggs Morgan. 

Matthew Scott Sloan . . . Mobile. 

Holland McTyeire Smith .L ee | 

Louis Sternfeld. Montgomery. 

Godfrey Rhodes Thomas. Sumter. 

Manly Curry Turpin Virginia! 

Henry Edward Werner . . Texas 

-Leonidas Wharton [][ '.Cherokee.' 

Gains Whitfield.... Marengo. 

Jere Crawford Williams Lee 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 23 

John Rutledge Williams . . .Jefferson. 

Edward Houston Wills Lee. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Oliver Hannibal Alford Marshall. 

William Warren Askew Georgia. 

Charles Homer Billingsley Elmore. 

Ellerslie Wallace Bullard Calhoun. 

Victor Hugo Clements Limestone. 

William Cruse Coles Marshall. 

Clyde Allen Collins. Hale. 

Robert Geoghegan Dawson Montgomery. 

Jesse Duncan Elliott . . .Minnesota. 

Marvin Ellis. Morgan. 

James Douglas Farley , Lee. 

Clarence Edmund Feagin : Bullock. 

David Fleming (c) Montgomery. 

Harold LaVan Fitch Wilcox. 

William Peace Gaddis Elmore. 

James Browder Garber Hale. 

William Holt Glenn. .Lee. 

Arthur Rodfer Grav Florida. 

* 

Jeremiah Warren Gwin /.Jefferson. 

William Houston Gwin. . .Jefferson. 

William Bulger Hamilton Elmore. 

Clifton Duane Haynie. Lee. 

William Tillman Heard Lee. 

Oscar Lynn Henry Marshall. 

Franklin Jerome Houston Jefferson. 

Mell Frazer Jackson Lee. 

Collins James Johnson Missouri. 

Albert Sidney Johnson Colbert. 

Morris Ketchum New York. 

James Allen Kyser Dallas. 

Richard Hartwell King Colbert. 

Martin James Lide Dallas. 

(c) Conditioned. 



■■ 



24 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

Gaston Joel Lipscomb Marengo. 

Earle Irwin MeBryde Wilcox. 

Henry Bigham Park Georgia. 

Douglass Welles Peabody . Mobile. 

William Marcus Peters Perry. 

Edgar Johnson Pierce Bullock. 

Wallace Powers Pruitt (c) Lowndes. 

Daniel Syers Robertson Chambers. 

Richard Blount Shepard Mobile. 

Julian Cassius Smith (c) Mobile. 

George Waddell Snedecor Jefferson. 

William Swift Sherrill Limestone. 

Siddons Stollenwerck Perry. 

John Griffin Swanson Macon. 

Enrico Alfonso Washington Georgia. 

Clifford Noble Wallace Elmore. 

John Osceola Webb Webb. 

Walker Dorr Willis . . . Florida. 

Forney Renf ro Yarbrough Georgia. 

John Eyres Davis Yonge , Florida. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Auber Faust Adams Montgomery. 

George Whitfield Allen Jefferson. 

Albert Miner Avery Florida. 

Earnest Stakely Ayers Calhoun!' 

Adolphus Berry .Tallapoosa. 

Marshall Leonard Bize. , Georgia. 

Johnson Wilson Black (c) Mobile. 

Wallace Edward Brewster Georgia! 

Cecil Battle Brown , Pike* 

Edward Jeffeson Bruister .Choctaw! 

William Jefferson Bruister (c) ' Choctaw! 

John Mangum Buchanan Lee * 

Harry Walter Campbell ;V///; T^essee 

Walter Brooks Cawthon (c) Mobile* 

Louis Hamburger Chandler (c) .*,' .Montgomery! 

(c) Conditioned. 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 25 

William Julius James Chase (c) Georgia. 

Dudley Chipley Florida. 

Earl Cline. . . Jefferson. 

Sidney Cornell Jefferson. 

Charles Sanders Culver Lee* 

Oscar Fitzalen Cunningham (c) Lee. 

Travers Daniell Etowah. 

William Abler Darden Calhoun. 

Howard Ellis Davis Mobile. 

William Watson Davis Mobile. 

Thomas Joseph Dowdell. Montgomery. 

William Eugene Finch Florida. 

James William Flanagan. Lee. 

Frank Flinn Montgomery. 

John Hope Fuller (c) Escambia. 

Horace Bright German (c) Tennessee. 

Charles Belshaw Goldthwaite , Pike. 

William Lanier Halsey ./. Madison. 

Henry Clif t Hawkins .7. Lee. 

Earnest Cecil Haynie. Lee. 

Bell George Hazard. . . ., . Calhoun. 

George Bloise Hill . . Talladega. 

Alexander Grice Horn .... . Sumter. 

Charles Henrv Howie. Calhoun. 

William Dana Hubbard Dallas. 

John Blevins Hudnall. , .Kentucky. 

Garrett Newton Hudmon Lee. 

John David Hudson Lee. 

James Daughtry Hudson'. Georgia. 

Frank Edward Hunt Jefferson. 

Arthur Jacobs Jefferson. 

Albert Jefferson. .Georgia. 

Walter Henry Jones. Pike. 

Ira LaFayette Jordan Elmore. 

William Micou Jordan Elmore. 

(c) Conditioned. 



"26 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

William George Karnathan Choctaw. 

Roy Kauffman Mobile! 

Walter Joseph Knight Mobile. 

Oscar Jennings Knox (c) l^ 

CarI La y .Etowah! 

Percy McLean Marshall Georgia. 

John Van Valkenbnrg Matthews .Madison 

Thomas Hatcher Matson Talladega. 

Ernest Linnwood Maybery Macon. 

Allen Davis McLain Lee ' 

Lonis Hnnt McCants (c) .'.'.'.'.'.'.' .'.'.Louisiana! 

Christian McDevitt Pennsylvania. 

Henry Miller Escambia. 

Roscoe Milner (c) .Georgia 

Robert Peyton Minis (c) Jefferson. 

John Harris Mitchell G ia 

WUl.am Lee Mitchell ;. ■ , Madison 

Frank Wallace Moseley Dallas 

Gilbert Meyer Newhouse (c) ! Marengo 

Erastns Jonathan Parsons .Jefferson 

Christopher Henderson Pinson Sumter 

Albert Wellman Pratt (c) [[[ Madison! 

Gregg Newton Preuit Lawrence. 

■Rnsse 1 Rates Preuit Lwww* 

Albert Davis Rambo Montgomery. 

George Daniel Randle Je 8 ffergo ; 

James Henry Ramdle \ BuUock 

John Patrick Rembert Mississippi! 

Samuel Rembert Tennessee 

Roy Gustavus Rhodes i\r„ 

Tod Hewitt Roberts .'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. '%£"* 

Nelson Horatio Romero. . " " p S ? D ' 

Wilbur Barnes Roney (c) M 

t™„,- t ^ . ^ J ,; Macon. 

Irving Jeffenes Roseborough r„ii™i, 

John Van Ryan * U !!° Ck - 

Edward Prescott Rutland Madison. 

. . . .Lee. 

(c) Conditioned 



mn , *»■ 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 27 

William Watson Rutland. Chambers. 

Clifford Philip Rutledge. Lee. 

George Washington Smith Lee. 

Benjamin Marion Smith Cherokee. 

Quinton Sorrell Talladega. 

Edward Taylor Marengo. 

Louis Earle Thornton Florida. 

William Lawson Thornton Talladega. 

Janies Feagin Tompkins .Lee. 

Filo Harris Turner Florida. 

George Baker Tyson Montgomery. 

Ivv Whitson Walker Colbert. 

Fletcher Peavy Whatley Lee. 

Walter Whitman (c) Lee. 

Walter Harry Wiley Pike. 

Henry Mathews Yonge Florida. 

SPECIAL AND IRREGULAR STUDENTS. 

Abbreviations: Ph — Pharmacy; E. <fe M. E. — Electrical and Mechan- 
ical Engineering; 0.— Chemistry ; Ag.— Agriculture ; C. E.— Civil 
Engineering; M. A, — Mechanic Arts. 

NAME. RFSIDKNCE. 

Milton Columbus Baldridge ph Madison. 

Idaline Bell Lee. 

-Arthur Bernard Beringer. .-. ph Barbour. 

Parham Benjamin Borden Hale. 

Peter Alexander Brannon ph Russell. 

Walter Leslie Bryant. ph Georgia. 

William James Cameron M. a. . . .Jefferson. 

Fredrico Cardenas Cuba. 

-Arthur Ernest Carter. ph Shelby. 

Edwin Weaver Caro If. a. Florida. 

David James Castleman e. & m. e Hale. 

Herschel Henry Conner Macon. 

i>Lewis Henry Grumpier ph. . . .Talladega. 

Pearce Henrv DeBardelaben ph Lee. 

Warren Alfred Dewees Tennessee. 

(c) Conditioned. 

Rufns White Butler Lee - 



^ 



& 



. 28 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

William Edwards ag Florida. 

William Bullock Fleming Montgomery. 

Ingraham Barron Foster Perry. 

John Sears Francis Jefferson. 

Swoope Darrow Gilbert e. & m. e.. Lauderdale. 

** Frank Crouch Green Georgia. 

Edward Putney Guerrant AG. . . .Kentucky. 

Abram Debow Given ph Madison. 

William Weatherlv Hannon. . Montgomery. 

Bunn Young Hill Georgia. 

Blair Hughes Jefferson. 

Edwin DeWitt Huguley Chambers. 

Clarence Luther Jenkins Talladega. 

Edward Kelly Montgomery. 

Carlos Lacayo ^ Nicaragua, C. A. 

John Alexander Lanford ph Sumter. 

John Fulton Lanier Madison. 

Howard Metcaff Letcher. ph Macon. 

Mary Emma Little Lee. 

Thomas Leonard Macon Elmore. 

George Mathews Marks . . Montgomery. 

Oliveria Masvidal ma Cuba. 

Mary Elinor Mitchell Calhoun. 

James Crowder Moore ph Lee. 

-JVIartin TheopiTus Moody ph Calhoun. 

James Frazer McNamee Lee. 

Peter Preer Myhand vet. sci Lee. 

Carlyle Nisbet . e. & m. e Georgia. 

Walter Cornelius O'Neill Sumter. 

Elbert William Patterson Sumter. 

William Burns Paterson ag. & h.. .Montgomery. 

Morris Pelham e. & m. e.. . .Calhoun. 

Israel Pickens PH# t Hale. 

Walter Gardner Pitts Russell. 

^Henry Virgil Eeid m... ! Barbour! 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 29 

Alston Keith Rennie ph Dallas. 

Harvey Owen Sargent Franklin. 

Wilbur Allen Sellers Bullock. 

George Clement Sequeira Nicaragua, C. A. 

Hans Schmidt Jefferson. 

Maurice Carberv Shannon ; Jefferson. 

Sidney Ewing Simpson E. & M. B. . Montgomery. 

Walter Ellis Sistrunk ph . Elmore. 

Bernard Horace Smith ph Lee. 

Henry Sleeth Stickle .Lauderdale. 

Richard Franklin Valentine e. & M. e.. .. .Barbour. 

Judson Franklin Webb Calhoun. 

James Waldo Woodruff .e. & m. e.. . . . Georgia. 

SUB-FRESHMAN <3LASS. 

Raymond Albertson Jefferson. 

Jesse Drew Beale Montgomery. 

Frank Gordon Bell Lee. 

William Bell. • • • Lee. 

Marvin Fitzpatrick Boykin . . .. Lee. 

Edward Worswick Braswell Georgia. 

Richard Young Buchanan , Georgia. 

Frank Turner Cammack Mobile. 

William Henry Chambers Colbert. 

John David Foshee Escambia. 

Thomas Claud Hawkins Elmore. 

Percy Wilbur Hudson Lee. 

William Inman Huff .'. ............. .Etowah. 

Arthur Dean Jones . Lawrence. 

Woodson Jones. Dallas. 

Edward James Lane Talladega. 

Thomas Reeves Leavell .Greene. 

Frank Gordon Lyon Lowndes. 

Andrew Lee Martin Lee. 



v^*- 



30 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



Richard Matthews ,. Jefferson. 

Howard Wilbur McMakin Russell. 

Hevwood McFaddin Dallas. 

Edward Adolphus Miles Mobile. 

Wei ton Xabors * Shelby. 

Enoch Lawrence McCormick Pruitt Lowndes. 

Pope Prvor Preuit. Colbert. 

Fornev Renfro Lee. 

Richard Hoskins Roberts Sumter. 

Oscar Early Rutland. . . . Lee. 

John Deal Steele Greene. 

Benjamin Marion Stewart Cherokee. 

Henry Jefferson Sullivan .Washington. 

John Hughes Thomason. Calhoun. 

Dudley Chipley Thornton Florida. 

George Taylor Williamson Lee. 

Jacob W r olff ; Montgomery. 

Fornev Renfro Wright - Lee. 

SUMMARY. 

Graduates. ....... \\ 

Senior Class 5$ 

Junior Class . . . 60 

Sophomore Class. ... 52 

Freshman Class. ....... ]02 

Special and Irregular Students 65 



Total in College Classes 346 

Sub-Freshman Class 33 



Total 



384 



* Deceased. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



31 



NUMBER OF STUDENTS IN 

English 316 

History 205 

French 28 

German 33 

Latin 137 

Mental Science 26 

Political Economy 53 

Mathematics 293 

Chemistry 156 

Chemical Laboratory. . 141 

Agriculture ..... 128 

Physics 187 

Botany , 82 

Horticulture 33 



EACH SUBJECT OF STUDY. 

Geology 55 

Civil Engineering 12 

Electrical Engineering. 61 
Mechanical Engineer'g. 57 

Biology 24 

Drawing .....230 

Mechanic Arts .... .... 258- 

Military Tactics , 344 

Mineralogy ... 19 

Physical Laboratory ... 42 

Physiology 55 

Veterinary Science — 39 

Pharmacy 37 

Bacteriology 11 



RESIDENCE. 



Alabama. , 
Georgia. . 
Florida. . 
Tennessee 
Cuba 



Nicaragua 
Kentucky 

Mississippi 

Louisiana 

South Carolina 
Missouri 



Texas 

Virginia 

Pennsylvania 

New York 



«••••••• 



...... 



...... 



318 

26 

. 15 

. 7 
. 3 

;■■ 2 

. 2 
. 2 
. 2 
. 2 
. 1 
. 1 
1 
1 
1 



\ 



V 



fllLITARY ORGANIZATION. 
1 899- 1 906. 



President. 

W. L. BROUN. 

Commandant 

COL. B. S. PATRICK. 

Surgeon. 

J. H. DRAKE. 

Battalion Staff, 

Cadet Captain H. P. Pow*:ll, Assistant to Commandant. 
Cadet 1st Lieutenant J. J. Flowers, Adjutant. 
Cadet 1st Lieutenant J. W. Shuff, Quartermaster. 
Cadet 2nd Lieutenant E. M. Mason, Assistant Adjutant. 
Cadet Sergeant J. D. Foy, Sergeant Major. 
Cadet Sergeant G. Whitfield, Quartermaster Sergeant 

Cadet Captains. 

3. 
4. 

Cadet First Lieutenants. 



1. F. Ashcraft, 

2. G.F.Boyd. 



W. E. Kelly, 
J. L. Burke. 



1. K B. McKenzie, 

2. J. P. Illges, 

3. A. C. Cameron, 

4. J. H. McGkhee, 

* 

1. S. D. Gilbert, 

2. R. S Finch, 

3. J. A. Lanford, 

1. S. H. Roberts, 

2. A. F. Jackson, 



5. R B. Hall, 

6. J. W. Boyd, 

7. C.W.Nixon, 

8. W. L. Anderson. 



Cadet Second Lieutenants. 



Cadet First Sergeants. 



4. W. C. Dowdell, 
5 M. M. Brooks. 



3. M. S. aSloan. 

4. E.H.Wills. 



Cadet Sergeants. 



1. M. H. Moore, 

2. W. B. McGehee, 

3. J . B. Powell, 

4. W. L. Greene, 

5. P. S. Haley, 
6 M.C. Turpin, 

7. B. B. Meriwether (Color Sergeant) 

8. I. L. Moore, 

9. F. C. Bivings, 



10. R.T.Arnold, 

11. G. R. Thomas, 

12. C. H. Haynes, 

13. D. J. Parker, 

14. D. H. Haynes, 

15. T. Bragg, 

16. J. T. Letcher, 

17. W. R. Lancaster, 

18. E. S. KlLLEBREW. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



33 



Cadet Corporals. 



1. W. D. Willis. 

2. J. E. D Yonge. 

3. J. A. Kyser. 

4. J. D. Elliott. 

5. W. M. Askew. 

6. G. W. Snedecor. 

7. C. A. Collins- 

8. J. B. Garber. 

9. W. C. Coles. 



10. 


R. B. Shepard. 


11. 


H. B. Park. 


12. 


D. W. Peabody. 


13. 


R . G. Dawson. 


14. 


J. D. Farley- 


15. 


F.J. Houston. 


16. 


M. Ketohum. 


17. 


8 Stollenwerok 



THE A. P. I. CADET BAND. 

M. Thos. Fullan, Bandmaster. 
J. A. Lanford, Principal Musician. 



A. M. Avery. 
F. C. Bivings- 
W. J. Cameron- 

T. Daniel 
W. A. Dewees 
M. Ellis- 

W. H. Glenn. 
A. Jefferson. 
I. L Jordan. 



M. D. Kahn. 
M. F. Kahn. 

D. W. Peabody- 

E. J. Pierce. 
G. Sequiera, 
L. Sternfeld- 

I. W. Walker. 
H. E. Werner. 



R. T. Arnold, Drum Major. 



Cadets of the Graduating Class who were reported to the Adju- 
tant General, U. S. Army, for publication in the "Official Army 
Register" as having ranked highest in the Military Department: 



1889. 

A. St C. Dunstan. 

B. H. Crenshaw. 
A. J. Burr. 

1890. 

F. D. MlLSTEAD. 
J. W. BlVINS. 

G. W. Emory. 
1991. 

L. E. Baker. 

C. C. Johnson. 
F. J. Biviss. 

1892. 

H. F. Dobbin. 
A. L. Jones. 
C. L. Brown. 

1893. 

Joel Dumas. 

C. H. Smith. 

J. F. Webb. 
1894. 

C. S. Andrews. 
P. P. McKeown. 
R. T. Dorsey. 

6 



1895. 
S. L. Coleman. 
H. H. Smith. 
L. B. Gammon. 

1896. 

A. L. Alexander. 
W. L. Fleming. 
W. M. Williams. 

1897. 

P. G. Clark. 
G. M. Holley. 
G. N. Mitcham. 

1898. 

A. H. Clark. 

A. McB. Ransom. 

Jno. Haralson. 

1899. 
I. F. McDonnell. 
A. H. Feagin. 
T. W. Wert. 



..* 






34 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute.. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

All applicants for admission should present testimo- 
nials of good moral character, and those who come from 
other colleges must present certificates of honorable 
discharge. 

To enter the freshman class the applicant must be- 
not less than fifteen years of age, and should be qualified 
to pass a satisfactory examination on the following sub- 
jects: 

1. Geography and History of the United States. 

2. English — (a) English grammar as contained in 
any standard text, (b) An examination upon sen- 
tences containing incorrect English, (c) A composi- 
tion giving evidence of satisfactory proficiency in spell- 
ing, punctuation, grammar, and division into para- 
graphs. 

(a) Reading. The composition in 1900 will be upon 
subjects drawn from one or more of the following works 
in English Literature: (1) Hughes's Tom Broion at 
Rugby; (2) Southey's Life of Nelson; (3) Shakes- 
peare's Julius Caesar; (4) Longfellow's Evangeline; 
(5) Scott's Ivanhoe; (6) Shakespeare's Merchant of 
Venice; (7) Irving's Sketch Book; (8) Macaulay's Es- 
say on 'Milton; (9) Scott's Mann ion; (10) Dickens's 
David Copperfield. 

The candidate will be required to present evidence of 
a general knowledge of the subject matter, and to 
answer simple questions on the lives of the authors. 
This part of the examination is intended to test only a 
general knowledge of the substance of the books. 

(b) Study and Practice. This part of the examina- 
tion presupposes the thorough study of the style of thfr 
work, and will be upon Julius C&sar and the Essay on 
Milton. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



35 



/ 



Preparation and examination on these tcorks will be 
necessary before the student is classed as regular in any 
course. 

3. Mathematics — (a) Arithmetic, including funda- 
mental operations; common and decimal fractions; de- 
nominate numbers; the metric system; percentage, in- 
cluding interest and discount; proportion, (b) Alge- 
bra to quadratic equations; especial preparation is 
urged in fundamental operations, factoring, multiples, 
dwisors and fractions; one book of geometry. 

4. Those applicants who desire to continue the study 
of Latin should be qualified to pass a satisfactory ex- 
amination in Latin grammar and the first two books of 
Csesar, in addition to the above subjects. 

In pronouncing Latin it is recommended that a be pronounced as in 
father, & as the a in Cuba; i as in prey, t as in men; % as in machine, % 
as in cigar; D as in old, o as in obey; u as in rule, u as in full; j as y in 
yard; c always as k in king; g always as g in get. 

For admission to the higher classes, students should 
be prepared to stand a satisfactory examination in all 
of the studies of the lower classes, as shown in the 
course of study. Students applying for admission to 
the sophomore class will be examined in mathematics 
through logarithms in Algebra, and on seven books in 
geometry. Where opportunity has not been offered to 
pursue special studies required at this College, the 
system of equivalents will be adopted, and studies which 
denote an equivalent amount of discipline and training 
will be accepted as satisfactory. But if not prepared 
to pass an examination in history and chemistry at the 
time of application, the applicant will be required 
before graduation to pass a satisfactory examination 
on those subjects. 



<^ 



36 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



ADMISSION ON CERTIFICATE 



<< 



<< 



Applicants will be admitted without examination on presenting a 
certificate from any of the certificate schools named herein. 

The following educational institutions having made application to 
be correlated to this College and having presented an approved 
course of study, are hereby declared to be certificate schools, and 
are granted the privilege set forth in the following: 

"Students from certificate schools will be admitted to the fresh- 
man class without examination upon the certificate of the presi- 
dent or principal showing definitely that such students have com- 
pleted satisfactorily all the studies required for admission, as 
"stated in the catalogue and are otherwise admissible." 

The privilege of admitting students to the Sophomore class on 
certificate will be granted only to those approved schools that have 
had a continuous existence for five years or more and have pre- 
viously had pupils admitted to that class without conditions. 

The following form of certificate will be used: 

I hereby certify that A B. . . . . has attended the 

(name the school or academy) for years and has studied 

the following subjects: 

in History (name the books) 

in English (name the books) 

in Algebra (state amount accomplished) 

in Geometry (state amount accomplished) 

in Latin (state books read) 

and having passed a satisfactory examination on these subjects as 

required in the Catalogue for admission to the class, 

I recommend him for the same. 



CERTIFICATE SCHOOLS. 

University Military School, Mobile j. d. Wright. 

Verner Military Institute, Tuscaloosa. w. H. Verner! 

University School, Montgomery j. m' Starke 

Mt. Willing High School, Mt. Willing 

State Normal School, Jacksonville c. W. Daiigette 

Male Academy, Huntsville Puryear & Wyatt 

Furman Academy, Livingston ...... .L. A. CockrelL 

High School, Opelika j. M Smallwood> 

University Military School, Clanton E . Y. McMorries 

N. A. Agricultural School, Athens m. K. Clements 

W. Ala. Agricultural School, Hamilton 

Eutaw Male Academy, Eutaw u. C Horton 

Boys' High School, Anniston. 7.7.V.H. C Gunnels' 

Taylor's School, Birmingham . . . . . w p Taylor* 



__ 



•-■' - 



► 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 37 

Gaylesville High School Jonn R Ray# 

Carrollton Academy L . v< R sser. 

Ninth District Agricultural School, Blountsville 

Gadsden High School I. W. Hill. 

Boyd High School, Ramer B. H. Boyd. 

Dadeville High School j. d. Lane. 

Prattville High School ;...A. W. Holstun. 

Eufaula High School F. L. McCoy. 

Union Springs High School f J. m. Sanders. 

Montgomery High School ; c. L. Floyd. 

Calera Academy C. C Slaton. 

Southern Agricultural School, Abbeville J. V. Brown. 

ADMISSION OF YOUNG WOMEN 

The privilege of becoming students, in this college is 
granted by the Trustees to young women of mature mind 
and character, on the following conditions : 

The applicant must be eighteen years of age, and if a 
candidate for a degree, be able to pass a satisfactory ex- 
amination in each of the four subjects as named below. 

If the applicant is a candidate for admission as a 
special or irregular student, she must be able to pass a 
satisfactory examination in two of the subjects named. 

(a) In English— Proficiency in spelling and punctuation; 
Grammar (Lockwood-Whitney) ; Rhetoric (Lockwood's Lessons and 
Genung's Outlines of Rhetoric) ; Scudder's Masterpieces of Ameri- 
can Literature; Syle's From Milton to Tennyson. 

For requirements in reading in literature see page 34. 

(b) In History— Macy's Our Government; Chambers's History 
of the United States; Myers's General History. 

(c) In Mathematics— Arithmetic; Algebra, including quadratic 
equations, logarithms and series; Plane and Solid Geometry; Plane 
and Analytic Trigonometry, as in Wentworth. 

(d) In Latin— Grammar, including the forms and syntax; 
Jones's Latin Prose Composition; translation of selections from 
Caesar, Nepos, Virgil, Cicero's Orations, Cicero's Letters, or the 

equivalent. 

The equivalents of these subjects, as in above text-books, may be 

substituted. 

Botany will constitute a required part of the general course for 
young women who are candidates for a degree. 

When admitted, upon complying with the conditions above stated, 






38 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

■ 

they may enter upon the study of any subject taught in the College 
and join any class, for which, upon examination, they may be found 
qualified. The only condition imposed will be that they engage in 
earnest study, and attend the exercises regularly. They will board 
in the town with private families and attend college only at the 
hours of their exercises. 

The Trustees authorize the Faculty to admit a candidate for a 
degree at the age of seventeen, provided she is able to comply with 
all the requirements for admission in the four subjects named and 
the application meets with its approval. 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS. 

Entrance examinations will be held on Wednesday, 
the 12th of September, the day on which the session 
opens. Candidates will also be examined during the 
session, when application is made for admission. 

Applicants who are not prepared to stand the en- 
trance examinations for full admission to the freshman 
class are admitted to the sub-college department, pro- 
vided they are fifteen years of age, and are found after 
examination qualified to profit by the instruction given. 
Those who, after admission, are inattentive to their 
studies, and neglectful of their duties will be required 
* to withdraw, but those who are studious and make 

sufficient progress will be advanced to full admission to 
the Freshman class when they are qualified to pass 
satisfactorily the required examinations. 

f 

Students, upon their arrival at Auburn, will report imemdiately 
to the President. No student will be admitted to a recitation in any 
class previous to matriculation. 

NUMBER OF EXERCISES REQUIRED. 

All students are required to have not less than fifteen recitations • 
per week, or their equivalent, in addition to the exercises in labora- 
tory work, drawing, and military drill. These additional exercises 
occupy not less than twelve hours per week, and in all give twenty- 
seven to thirty hours per week required in college exercises. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



39 



Special and Irregular Students. 

The privilege of electing studies in the lower classes 
is not granted to young students nor to their parents. 
The Faculty will assign a student, on admission, to that 
class of a prescribed' course for which he is qualified ; 
and for special reasons, approved by the Faculty, he 
may be permitted to become irregular. 

Students qualified to prosecute the studies of the 
junior class, and those over twenty-one years of age 
ithat are not candidates for a degree, are permitted to 
take, with the advice of the Faculty, the subjects of 
.•study for which they may be qualified. 

A student who does not take all the studies in a class of one of 
the degree courses, as prescribed in the catalogue, and is permitted 
to take* an irregular course, will be assigned to a member of the 
Faculty, who will -act as his special adviser, and when his course of 
study has been approved by the Faculty no other change will be 
permitted without the endorsement of his adviser. 

Regular students who fail to pass satisfactory final examinations 
in any one study become irregular students. They will be classed 
•as regular students pursuing a course for a degree, whenever they 
can pass the examinations in those subjects in which they were 
found deficient. 

Students, candidates for a degree, who are not in full standing 
in all the prescribed studies of a class, rank in the military depart- 
ment with that class in which they have the greatest number of 
studies, and their names are so placed in the catalogue. 

ADMISSION TO HIGHER CLASSES. 

At the beginning of each term a student in the sub-freshman clasa 
may, on application approved by the Faculty, be examined for ad- 
mission to the freshman class in history, English, mathematics, or 
Latin, and if his examination is satisfactory in any subject, he will 
l)e admitted to the freshman class in that subject only. 

Students who have completed satisfactorily all the studies of the 
sophomore class, as prescribed in the catalogue, in any one of the 
regular degree courses, can enter, without condition, the junior 
-class in any course, except in the general course, or the course in 
pharmacy, :in which Latin is required. 



207881 



O 



^^^^M 



40 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

Students who are admitted to the junior class from other institu- 
tions, on examination in English, Latin, and mathematics, and who 
have not completed all the studies of the sophomore class, in order 
to graduate, will be required to complete the course in chemistry 
and history as taught in the sophomore class. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

The courses of study include the Physical, Chemical, 
and Natural Sciences, with their applications; Agricul- 
ture; Biology; Mechanics, Astronomy, Mathematics; 
Drawing; Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical Engineer- 
ing; Physiology and Veterinary Science; Pharmacy; 
English, 'French, German, and Latin Languages; His- 
tory, Political Economy; Mental and Moral Sciences. 

These studies are arranged in regular courses so as to 
offer a liberal and practical education as a preparation 
for the active pursuits of life. 

There are five degree courses for undergraduates, each 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science, (B. Sc.) 
and requiring four years for its completion. 

I. Course in Chemistry and Agriculture. 
II. Course in Civil Engineering. 

III. Course in Electrical and Mechanical En- 
gineering. 

IV. General Course. 

V. Course in Pharmacy. 

There are also three partial courses, each requiring 
two years for its completion : 

VI. Two- Year Course in Agriculture. 
VII. Two- Year Course in Mechanic Arts. 
VIII. Two- Year Course in Pharmacy. 

Course I. includes theoretical and practical instruc- 
tion in those branches that relate to chemistry and agri- 
culture, and is especially adapted to those who propose 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



41 



to devote themselves to agriculture or chemical pur- 
suits. 

Course II. includes the principles and applications of 
the sciences that directly relate to civil engineering, 
and is adapted to those who expect to enter that profes- 
sion. 

Course III. includes, besides the general principles 
and applications of the sciences, a special course in the 
applications of electricity and mechanics, and is 
arranged for the profession of electrical and mechan- 
ical engineering. 

Course IV. has been arranged to give a general and 
less technical education in subjects of science and lan- 
guage to meet the wants of those students who have 
selected no definite vocation in life, as well as of those 
who propose ultimately to engage in teaching or in some 
commercial or professional business. 

Course V. includes, besides the general education of 
course IV. in the lower classes, a special course in phar- 
macy and chemistry, and is adapted to those who expect 
to become pharmacists, manufacturing chemists, or to 
enter upon the study of medicine. 

Courses VI. VII. VIII. have been arranged for the 
benefit of those students who, for reasons satisfactory 
to themselves, are unable to continue at college four 
years and to take one of the regular degree courses. 

A student who completes satisfactorily all the work of the senior 
class in a department, including the laboratory work, will be 
awarded a certificate of proficiency in said subject. 

Students who complete either of the two-year courses will, on 
passing a satisfactory examination, receive certificates indicating 
their attainments. 

No degree or certificate of proficiency will be given in any course 
unless the applicant has passed a satisfactory examination In ele- 
mentary English. Every candidate for a degree will be required 
to stand this special examination during the second term of the 
Senior ye,ar. 



42 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



Declamation and themes or orations are required of all regular 
students pursuing courses leading to a degree. 

POST-GRADUATE COURSES. 

The post-graduate degrees are — Master of Science, 
Mining Engineer, Civil Engineer, Electrical and 
Mechanical Engineer, and Pharmaceutical Chem- 
ist. 

A more extended post-graduate course of study may 
T>e taken by a graduate of this College or of any other 
institution of equal grade. The completion of a course 
which leads to a post-graduate degree requires one 
year's residence at the College, spent in the satisfactory 
prosecution of a course of study, with such laboratory 
work as may be approved by the Faculty. 

The candidates must also present to the Faculty a satisfactory 
thesis showing independent investigation upon some subject per- 
taining to his course, and must pass an examination at the close of 
•each term on the course of study prescribed, in which he must at- 
tain a grade of 75 per cent. The examination is written, and also 
oral in the presence of the Faculty. 

The subject of the thesis must be submitted to the Faculty for 
approval prior to January 1st, and the thesis given to the professor 
oy April 1st. 

Applicants for post-graduate degrees are subject to the general 
regulations as other students, but are exempt from all military duty. 
The following courses are prescribed for the degrees named: 
Mining Engineer. — Students who have received the degree of B. 
Sc. in engineering, civil, or electrical and mechanical, or who have 
prosecuted an equivalent course of study, can enter upon a special 
course of mining engineering, which includes the following subjects 
of study: 

Industrial Chemistry, Analytic Chemistry, Assaying, Reduction of 
Ores, Mineralogy, Economic Geology, with practical work in the 
fleld, Mining Machinery with the applications of steam and elec- 
tricity to the various operations connected with the exploitation of 
mines. 

The student, if a candidate for a degree, will also be required to 
prosecute the necessary studies in that course of engineering in 
which he has not graduated. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



43 



This course of study will be under the charge of the professors of 
geology, chemistry, civil, electrical and mechanical engineering. 

Civil Engineer. — Civil Engineering, Mathematics, Analytical Me- 
chanics. 

V Electrical and Mechanical Engineer. — Electrical Engineering, Me- 
chanical Engineering. 

Pharmaceutical Chemist. — Pharmacy* and Chemistry. 

Master of Science. — Studies in three departments, in two of which 
the candidates must have previously completed tl^ full course of 
the senior class; or in special cases, with the approval of the 
Faculty, a student may devote his full time to work in one or two 
■departments. 

Special Students in Post-Senior Studies. — Students who are not 
.graduates, but are qualified in special subjects to prosecute post- 
senior studies, and desire to prepare themselves more thoroughly 
for professional or special work in any one of the departments of 
engineering, in chemistry or pharmacy, veterinary science, or other 
subject in which instruction is given may, when qualified, with ap- 
proval of the faculty, enter this higher department of study and 
have all the privileges of post-graduate students. 

A certificate of proficiency will be given when any one subject of 
a post-graduate course is satisfactorily completed. 

SPECIAL ONE-YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 

Young men over twenty-one years of age who desire to study agri- 
culture will be permitted, without examination, to enter any class 
under the professor of agriculture, and will be excused from reciting 
in any other class, from military duty, and from all other college 
duties; but will be under the general college regulations, and will 
be required to have their time fully occupied. 

They may attend the lectures in agriculture in all the classes and 
engage in the practical work at the experiment station, in the field, 
stock-yard, dairy, garden, orchard, vineyard, etc., and may thus, in 
one year, acquire valuable practical knowledge of scientific agricul- 
ture. 

PHOTOGRAPHY. 

During the session there will be given by Professor Mell a course 
of twelve lectures on photography. Tnis course will be elective and 
the instruction wijl be open to any student that may desire to learn 
how to make pictures. It will be necessary for each student to pro- 
Tide himself with an outfit that will cost from $11.50 to $16.00. 



44 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

LABORATORY INSTRUCTION. 

Laboratory instruction constitutes an important 
feature in the courses of education provided for the 
students of this Institute, and as far as possible all 
students are required to enter upon laboratory work 
in some one department. 

Laboratory instruction and practical work are given 
in the following departments : . 
I. Chemistry. 
II. Civil Engineering, Field Work, Surveying, 

Etc. 

III. Agriculture. 

IV. Botany. 

V. Mineralogy. 

VI. Biology. 

VII. Technical Drawing. 
VIII. Mechanic Arts. 

IX. Physics^ 

X. Electrical Engineering. 

XL Mechanical Engineering. 

XII. Physiology and Veterinary Science. 

XIII. Pharmacy. 

Note.— Special work in English or History may be taken by stu- 
dents in the general course as a substitute for laboratory work. 





Alabama Polytechnic ItiftkrOTi. 45 

I.— COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 



The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Second Term. Third Term. 

5. English. 5. English. 

2. History. 2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics.3. Elementary Physics. 2. Agriculture. 
3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 



First Term. 
5. English. 
2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



3. Military Drill. 



3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



First Term. 
3. English. 
3. History. 



Third Term. 
3. English. 
3. Botany (a). 
3. General Chemistry. 

2. Agriculture (b). 

3. Drawing. 

2. Physiology. 



First Term. 
3. English. 
3. Physics. 



Third Term. 
3. English. 
3. Physics. 



Second Term. 
3. English. 
3. History. 
3. General Chemistry. 3. General Chemistry. 

2. Agriculture. 2. agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

2. Physiology. 2. Physiology. r 
6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

3. Military DrilL 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 
Second Term. 
3. English. 
3. Physics. 

3. Industrial Chemistry3. Industrial Chemistry3. Industrial Chemistry 
2. Agriculture. 2. Agriculture. 2. Agriculture (b). 

4. Botany (Lab'y). 4. Botany (Lab'y). 4. Botany (Lab'y). 

1. Military Tactics. 1. Military Tactics. 1. Military Tactics. 
9. Chemical Lab'y. 9. Chemical Lab'y. 9. Chemical Lab'y. 

2. Veterinary Science. 2. Veterinary Science. 2. Veterinary Science. 

2. Clinical Lab'y. 2. Clinical Lab'y. 2. Clinical Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

SENIOR CLASS. 
First Term. Second Term. Third Term. 

2. English Literature. 2. Political Econo'y (c)2. Political Economy. 
2. Mental Science (d). 2. Mental Science (d).2. Mental Science (d). 
2. Physics. 2. Astronomy. 2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 2. Geology. 2. Geology. 

5. Biology. 5. Biology. 5. Biology. 

2. AgriculturT Ch'm't'y.2. Agricultur'l Ch'm't'y.2. Agricultur'l Ch'm't'y. 

1. Military Science. 1. Military Science. 1. Military Science. 
9. Chemical Lab'y. 9. Chemical Lab'y. 9. Chemical Lab'y. 

2. Veterinary Science. 2 Veterinary Science. 2. Veterinary Science. 
2. Clinical Lab'y. 2. Clinical Lab'y. 



2. Clinical Lab'y. 



(a) Begins March 1st. 
(c) Begins Feb. 15th. 



(b) Also Practical Agriculture. 

(d) French or German may be substituted. 



1 — ■ — 

NOTE.-There should be in the schedule for the Sophomore 
Class— "Mathematics, 5 exercises for each term." 




46 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



II.— COURSE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 



The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 
Second Term. 
5. English. 
2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Elementary Physics. 3. Elementary Physics. 2. Agriculture. 
3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 
5. English. 
2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



Third Term. 
5. English. 
2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



First Term. 
3. English. 
3. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Second Term. Third Term. 

3. English. 3. English. 

3. History. 3. Botany (a). 

5. Mathematics, 5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 3. General Chemistry. 3. General Chemistry. 
2. Agriculture (b). 2. Agriculture (b). 2. Agriculture (b). 

2. Physiology. 2. Physiology. 2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y ^ 



2. Chemical Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 

First Term. 



2. Chemical Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 
Second Term. 



2. Chemical Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 

Third Term. 



3. English, French, or 3. English, French, or 3. English, French, or 

German. 
3. Physics. 
5. Mathematics 
5. Civil Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 
1. Military Tactics. 



German. 
3. Physics. 
5. Mathematics 
5. Civil Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 



German. 
3. Physics. 
5. Mathematics 
5. Civil Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 
1. Military Tactics. 



1. Military Tactics. 

6. Lab'y.Mech. Arts (c) 6. Lab'y,Mech. Arts (c)6. Lab'y,Mech. Arts (c> 

1. Field Work, Engin'g.l. Field Work, Engin'g.l. Field Work, Engin'g. 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

SENIOR CLASS. 
First Term. Second Term. Third Term. 

2. English Literat'e (d)2. Political Econo'y (d)2. Political Econo'y (d) 
2. Physics. 2. Astronomy. 2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 2. Geology. 2. Geology. 

3. Mathematics. 3. Mathematics, 3. Mathematics . 

(a) Begins March 1st. 

(b) For Agriculture may be substituted Physical Laboratory 

(c) Or Mineralogy. 

<d) For Eng. Lit. and Pol Econ. may be substituted French or Ger- 
man. 



Alabama Polytechnic In&titute. 



4T 



$. Civil Engineering. 5. Civil Engineering. 5. Civil Engineering. 
5. Drawing. 5. Drawing. 5. Drawing. 

1. Military Science. 1. Military Science. l. Military Science. 
4. Mech. Eng., Lab'y. 4. Mech. Eng., Lab'y. 4. Mech. Eng., Lab'y. 
Field Work, Engin'g. Field Work, Engin'g. Field Work, Engin'g.. 



III.— COURSE IN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANI- 
CAL ENGINEERING. 

he numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number honrs per week. 
In freshman and sophomore classes the same studies are prescribed 
as in Course II in Civil Engineering. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

First Term. Second Term. Third Term. 

3. English, French, or 3. English, French, or 3. English, French, or 
German. German. German. 

3. Physics. 3. Physics. 3. Physics. 

5. Mathematics. 5. Mathematics. 5. Mathematics. 

4. Electrical Engin'g. 4. Electrical Engin'g. 4. Electrical Engin'g. 

3. Mech. Engineering. 3. Mech. Engineering. 3. Mech. Engineering. 

4. Mechanical Drawing. 4. Mechanical Drawing. 4. Mechanical Drawing. 
4. Electrical Lab'y. 4. Electrical Lab'y. 4. Electrical Lab'y. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
1. Military Tactics. 
3. Military Drill. 



6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
1. Military Tactics. 
3. Military Drill. 



6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
1. Military Tactics. 
3. Military Drill. 



SENIOR CLASS. 



First Term. Second Term. Third Term. 

2. Eng. Literature (a). 2. Political Econo'y (a) 2. Political Econo'y (a> 
2. Physics. 2. Astronomy. 2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 2. Geology. 2. Geology. 

3. Mathematics. 3. Mathematics. 3. Mathematics. ' 
5. Electrical Engin'g. 5. Electrical Engin'g. 5. Electrical Engin'g. V 

5. Mech. Engineering. 5. Mech. Engineering. 5. Mech. Engineering. 

2. Electrical Designing. 2. Electrical Designing. 2. Electrical Designing. 

6. Electrical Lab'y. 6. Electrical Lab'y. 6. Electrical Lab'y. 

4. Mech. Eng. Lab'y. 4. Mech. Eng. Lab'y. 4. Mech. Eng. Lab'y, 
1. Military Science. 1. Military Science. 



1. Military Science. 



(a) French or German may be substituted. 



48 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



\ 






IV.— GENERAL COURSE. 

The numerals opposite the subject! indicate number of hours^per week. 



First Term. 
3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latins 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 

■6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. . 

First Term. 
5. Latin. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Drawing. "\ 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 

2. Chemical Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. , 

First Term. 
3. English. 
3. Physics. 
3. Mathematics. 
3. French. 
3. German. 
3. Latin. 

1. Military Tactics. 
6. Lab'y Work (b). 
3. Military Drill. 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Second Term. 
3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. . 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Second Term. 
5. Latin. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Drawing., 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 

2. Chemical Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 
3. English. 
3. Physics. 
3. Mathematics. 
3. French. 
3. German. 
3. Latin. 

1. Military Tactics. 
6. Lab'y Work (b). 
3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 
3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. . 

Third Term. 
5. Latin. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 

2. Chemical Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 
3. English. 
3. Physics. 
<, 3. Mathematics. 
3. French. 
3. German. 
3. Latin. 

1. Military Tactics. 
6. Lab'y Work (b). 
3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 



SENIOR CLASS. 
Second Term. 
2. English Literature. 2. Political Econo'y (c)2. Political Economy. 
Mental Science. 2. Mental Science. 2. Mental Science. 



Third Term. 



2. Physics. 

2. Geology. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1. Military Science. 
6. Lab'y Work (b). 



2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1. Military Science. 
6. Lab'y Work (b). 



(a) Begins March 1st. 



2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 

1. Military Science. 
6. Lab'y Work (h^). 



-which L b mlKqtnfl^ ^ ^ lab ° rat ° ry ° f an * departments 
(c) Begins February 15th. 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



49 



V.— COURSE IN PHARMACY. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate number of hours per week 





FRESHMAN CLASS. 




First Term. 


Second Term. 


Third Term. 


3. English. 


3. English. 


3. English. 


2. History. 


2. History. 


2. History. 


5. Latin. 


5. Latin. 


5. Latin. 


5. Mathematics. 


5." Mathematics. 


5. Mathematics. 


3. Drawing. 


3. Drawing. 


3. Drawing. 


6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 


6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 


2. Agriculture. 


3. Military Drill. 


3. Military Drill. 


6. Mechanic Arts. 




i 


3. Military Drill. 


i' 


SOPHOMORE CLASS 


t 


First Term,. 


Second Term. 


Third Term. 


5. Latin. 


5. Latin. 


5. Latin. 


3. History. 


3. History. 


3. Botany (a). 


5. Mathematics. 


5. Mathematics. 


5. Mathematics. 


3. General Chemistry. 


3. General Chemistry. 


3. General Chemistry. 


2. Physiology. 


2. Physiology. 


2. Physiology. 


3. Drawing. 


3. Drawing. 


3. Drawing. 


6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 


6. iftech. Art Lab'y. 


6. Mech. Art Lab'y. 


2. Chemical Lab'y. 


2. Chemical Lab'y. 


2. Chemical Lab'y. 


3. Military Drill. 


3. Military Drill. 
JUNIOR CLASS. 


3. Military Drill. 


First Term. 


Second Term. 


Third Term. 


3. Physics. * 


3. Physics. 


3. Physics. 


6. Chemical Lab'y. 


6. Chemical Lab'y. 


6. Chemical Lab'y. 


4. Botanical Lab'y. 


4. Botanical Lab'y. 


4. Botanical Lab'y. 


3. English (a). 


3. English (a). 


3. English (a). 


3. Pharmacy. 


3. Pharmacy. 


3. Pharmacy. 


9. Pharmaceutical Lab 


. 9. Pharmaceutical Lab 


9. Pharmaceutical Lab. 


4. Pharmacognosy. 


4. Pharmacognosy. 


4. Pharmacognosy. 


1. Military Tactics. 


1. Military Tactics. 


1. Military Tactics. 


3. Military Drill. 


3. Military Drill. 
SENIOR CLASS. 


3. Military Drill. 


First Term. 


Second Term. 


Third Term. 


5. Biology. 


5. Biology. 


5. Biology. 


6. Chemical Lab'y. 


6. Chemical Lab'y. 


6. Toxicology. 


5, Pharmacy. 


5. Pharmacy. 


5. Pharmacy. 



8. Pharmaceutical Lab. 8. Pharmaceutical Lab. 8. Pharmaceutical Lab. 
5. Pharmacognosy. 5. Pharmacognosy. 5. Pharmacognosy. 
1. Military Science. 1. Military Science. 1. Military Science. 
v 3. Materia Medica. 3. Materia Medica. 3. Bacteriology. 

(a) Begins March 1st. 

(a) French or German may be substituted. 

7 



50 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



VI— TWO-YEAR COURSE IN MECHANIC ARTS. 



First Term. 
5. English. 
2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



FIRST YEAR. 

Second Term. 
5. English. 
2. History. 



5. Mathematics. 
3. Elementary Physics. 3. Elementary Physics. 2. 
3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 3. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. 

SECOND YEAR. 



Third Term. 
5. English. 
2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 

Agriculture. 

Drawing. 

Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

Military Drill. 



First Term. 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 
3. Drawing. 



Second Term. 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 
3. Drawing. 



Third Term. 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 
3. Drawing. 



12. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 12. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 12. Mechanic Art Lab'y 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

VII-TWO- YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 



First Term. 
5. English. 5. 

2. History. 2. 
5. Mathematics. 5. 

3. Elementary Physics. 3. 

3. Drawing. 3, 

4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 4. 
3. Military Drill. 3! 
2. Practical Agricult're.2. 



First Term. 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

4. Agriculture. 
2. Physiology. 

2. Veterinary Science. 
12. Practical Agricult're 12 

3. Military Drill. 3. 



3. 
:>. 
3. 
4. 
2. 
2 



FIRST YEAR. 

Second Term. 
English. 5. 

History. 2. 

Mathematics. 5. 

Elementary Physics. 2. 
Drawing. 3, 

Mechanic Art Lab'y. 4. 
Military Drill. 3. 

Practical Agricult're.2. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Second Term. 

English. 3 

Mathematics. , 5. 

General Chemistry. 3. 

Agriculture. 4. 

Physiology. 2. 

Veterinary Science. 2. 
• Practical Agricult'rel2. 

Military Drill, 3. 



Third Term. 

English. 

History. 

Mathematics. 

Agriculture. 

Drawing. 

Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

Military Drill. 

Practical Agricult're. 

Third Term. 
English. 
Mathematics. 
General Chemistry. 
Agriculture. 
Physiology. 
Veterinary Science. 
Practical Agricult're 
Military Drill, 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



51 



VIII— TWO-YEAR COURSE IN PHARMACY. 



\ First Term. 

3. General Chemistry. 

2. Chemical Lab'y. 

3. English. 

2. Physiology. 

3. Pharmacy. 

4. Pharmacognosy. 

6. Mech. Art Lab'y. (a) 
3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 



FIRST YEAR. 
Second Term. 

3. General Chemistry. 3. 

2. Chemical Lab'y. 2. 

3. English^ "7* 3. 

2. Physiology. 2. 

3. Pharmacy. 3. 

4. Pharmacognosy. 4. 
6. Mech. Art Lab'y. (a) 6. 
3. Military Drill. 3. 

SECOND YEAR. 
Second Term. 



Third Term. 
General Chemistry. 
Chemical Lab'y. 
Botany. 
Physiology. 
Pharmacy. 
Pharmacognosy. 

Mech. Art Lab'y. (a) 
Military Drill. 



5. Pharmacy. 5. Pharmacy. 5. 

5. Pharmacognosy. 5. Pharmacognosy. 5. 

8. Pharmaceutical Lab. 8. Pharmaceutical Lab. 8. 



6. Chemical Lab'y. 
3. Materia Medica. 
6. Botanical Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



6. Chemical Lab'y. 7. 

3. Materia Medica. 3. 

6. Botanical Lab'y. 6. 

3. Military Drill. 3. 

(a) or Physical Laboratory. 



Third Term. 

Pharmacy. 
Pharmacognosy. 
Pharmaceutical Lab. 
Toxicology. 
Bacteriology. 
Botanical Lab'y. 
Military Drill. 



===r.jci 



■MM! 



■■■■ 




SCHEDULE OF EXERCISES. 



fcO 



HOUKS 


MONDAY 


TUESDAY 


WEDNESDAY 


THl'R.sDAY 


I RIDAY 


8ATURDAY 






3. Physiology. 










I. 


4. Algebra. 


4. Geometry. 


4. Algebra. 


4. Geometry. 


4. Algebra. 






3. Latin. 


3. Latin. 


3. Latin. 


3. Latin 


3. Latin . 




8-9 




2. German. 


— 


2. German. 




Exercises in Elocuti'n. 




1 and 2 Drawing. 


1 and 2 Drawing. 


1 and 2 Drawing. 


1 and 2 Drawing. 


1 and 2 Drawing. 






1. Elec. EngineVg 


2. Botany 


1. Vet. Science. 


2. Botany. 1. Veterinary Sci. 






2. Mec. EngineVg 


1. Elec. EngineVg 


1. Elec. EngineVg 


1. Mental Science. 1 Elec. EnginVg. 






1. Biology. 


2. Mec. EngineVg 


i. German. 


1. Elec.EngineVgil. German. 






1 German. 


1 Mental Science. 












4. English. 


4. History. 


4. English. 


4. History. 


4. English. 




II. 


3. Chemistry. 


3. Agriculture. 


3. Chemistry. 


3. Agriculture. 


3. Chemistry. 


Military Drill. 




2. Civ. Engineer'g. 


2. Civ. EngineVg. 


2. Civ. Eugineer'g 


2. Civ. EngineVg. 


2. Civ. EngineVg 




9-10 


2. Latin. 


2. Botany. 


2. Latin. 


2. Botany. 


2. Latin. 






1. Calculus. 


1. Physics. 


1. Calculus. 


1. Physics. 








1. Biology. 


2. Elec. EngineVg 


2. Vet. Science. 


2. Elec. EngineVg 


1. Calculus. 






2. Elec. EngineVg 


• 


2. Elec. EngineVg 


*~ 


2. Mech. EnginVg 
2. Vet. Science. 


■ 


III. 


3. English. - 


3. History (1, 2). 


3. English. 


3. History (1, 2). 


3. English. 


Mechanic Arts. 




2. Physics. V 


S.-Bo^ayX^J)*/ 1 


V, 


3. Botany CX3JL 


2. Physics. 


Chemical Laboratory. 






1. Biology. 


2. Physics. 


1. Civ. EngineVg 




Electrical Laboratory. 


10-11 


1. Civ. EngineVg. 


1. Civ. Engineer'g 


1. Latin. 


4^EngJifeb. 


1. Civ. Engineer'g. 


Physical Laboratory. 




1. Biology. 


4^sgCaJ^ 


1. Civ Engineer'g 


1. Mech. EnginVg 




Veterinary Clinics. 




1. Latin. 


1. Mec. EngineVg 


1. Biology. 


2. French. 


4. History (3). 


Biological Laboratory. 




1. Mec. EngineVg 


2. French. 

2. Mec. Drawing, 


1. Mech.EnginVg 




1. Mech. EnginVg 


Field Engineering. 






o 
t- 1 

fa 

Q 

W 

i— i 

Q 



S5 

CD 

a 
is 



^M 



SCHEDULE OF EXERCISES — Continued. 



HOURS 



MONDAY 



TUESDAY 



WEDNESDAY 



THURSDAY 



FRIDAY 



SATURDAY 



IV. 



11-12 



4. Physics (1,2). 



4. Agriculture (3) 
4. Latin (1,2). 

3. Drawing. 

2. Mathematics . 
2. Chemistry. 
1. England, 2). 
. Pol. Econ.(2,3) 

4. Mechanic Arts. 



V. 



12-1 



4. Drawing. 

3. Mathematics. 
2. English. 

4. Mechanic Arts . 
1. Elec. Designing 
1. French. 



P.M. 



VI., VI I 



2-4 



4. Mechanic Arts. 

3. FieldWork Agr 
1 & 2 Laboratory 

Chemistry. 
1 & 2 Field Work, 

Engineering 
1 & 2Mach. Work 
Elec. Lab. Work. 
Physical Labor'y. 



4. Latin. 
3. Drawing. 

2. Agriculture. 
2. Mathematics. 
1. Chemistry. 
1. French. 



4. 'Physics (1, 2). 
4. Latin (3). s 
g. History jj^ 
- ^7 Botanj^(2, r 3JJ 
2. Mathematics. 
2. Chemistry. 

. English (1,2). 
1. Political Econ- 
omy (2,3). 
4. Mechanic Arts 



3. Mathematics. 
2. English. 
1. Geology. 



3. Mechanic Arts 
2. Mineralogical 
^Laboratory 

Military Drill (*). 

1. Mech. Lab'tory. 
Elec. Lab'y Work. 
1 and 2 History. 



4. Drawing. 

3. Mathematics. 

4. Mechanic Arts 

2. German. 

1. Elec. Designing 

2. Anal.Chemis'ty. 



4. Mechanic Arts. 

3. FieldWork Agr. 
1 & 2 Laboratory. 
Chem 
1 & 2 Field Work, 
Engineering 



4. Latin. 

2. Agriculture. 

2. Mathematics. 
1. Chemistry. 

3. Physiology. 
1. French. 



3. Mathematics. 
2. English. 
1. Geology. 



I 



4. Physics (1, 2). 

4. Agriculture (3) 
4. Latin (1,2). 

3. Drawing. 

2. Mathematics. 
2. Chemistry. 

1. MilitaryScience 

4. Mechanic Arts. 



/ 



3. Mechanic Arts 
2. Mineralogical 
Laboratory. 

Military Drill (*; 

1. Mech. Labor'y. 



4. Drawing. 

3. Mathematics. 

4 Mechanic Arts 

1. Elec. Designing 

2. Milit'ryTactics 



3. Mechanic Arts. 
Chemical Laboratory. 
Electrical Laboratory. 
Physical Laboratory. 
Veterinary Clinics. 
Biological laboratory. 
Field Engineering. 



1 & 2 Mach. Work.iElec. Lab'y Work 



Ex'cis. in Elocut'n 
Elec. Lab. Work. 
Physical Labor'y. 



1. and 2 History 



4. Mechanic Arts 

3. FieldWork Agr. 
2 French. 
1 & 2 Lab. (hem 
L & 2 Field Work, 
Engineering. 
1 & 2 Mach. Work. 
Ex'cis. in Elocut'n 
Elec. Lab Work. 
Physical Labor'y. 



3. Mechanic Arts. 
Chemical Laboratory. 
Electrical Laboratory. 
Physical Laboratory. 
Veterinary Clinics. 
Biological Laboratory. 
Field Engineering. 



Chapel services daily at 7:45 a. m. 

Numbers prefixed denote classes— 1 denotes senior, 2 junior, etc. Numbers affixed— (1), (2), (3) —denote terms 
*From 4 :30 to 5 :30 p. m. 






o 

f 



Q/i 

»— I 

Q 



GO 

I 



M* 



CO 




I j .-y-j..---,- ■ 5= 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION. 



-»♦ — 



PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY. 

PRESIDENT BROUN. 
PROFESSOR DUNSTAN. 

The instruction is given by recitations from text- 
books and lectures, illustrated by experiments. The 
first part of the course is occupied with elementary 
rational mechanics, treated graphically. 

This is followed by a full discussion of molecular me- 
chanics; while due prominence is given to principles, 
frequent reference is made to the applications of 
science. 

The studies of the junior class include the properties 
of matter, units of measure, force, work, energy, kine- 
matics, kinetics, mechanic powers, friction pendulum, 
molecular forces of solids, liquids and gases, theory of 
undulations, heat, electricity, magnetism, etc. 

The studies of the senior class include light, and 
astronomy. 

Post-graduate Course. This includes the study of 
analytical mechanics, and requires a knowledge of dif- 
ferential and integral calculus. 

Text-Books. 

Atkinson's Ganot's Physics, Young's Astronomy, Berry's History 
of Astronomy, Bowser's Analytic Mechanics. 

PHYSICAL LABORATORY. 

Instructor H. H. Kyser. 

The laboratory work includes courses for the sophomore and 
freshman classes, and is so arranged as to begin with a study of the 
systems and units of measurements and to conclude with simple ex- 
periments in heat 




t 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



55 



The student is required to ascertain experimentally various physi- 
cal laws, hence in all exercises there is something to measure. From 
these measurements he is require4 to find the law connecting the 
quantities involved. Results of experiments are to he entered, in 
tabular form, together with methods, diagrams, etc., in a laboratory 
record book, which each student is required to prepare. At the 
close of each week this book is criticised and graded according to its 
accuracy and neatness. 

Freshman Course. 

First Term, (a) Elementary physics (mechanics and heat). 
Second Term, (b) Elementary graphical statics (continued in 

sophomore year). 
Third Term, (c) Systems and units of measurements. 

(d) Simple measurements of length, surface, volume and weight. 

Sophomore Course. 

First Term, (a) Simple measurements and designing verniers 

and micrometers. 
(6) Elementary graphical statics, (c) Forces, moments and 

work. 
Second Term, (d) Simple machines, and friction (determining 
mechanical advantages, loss, efficiency, law, etc.). 

(e) Pendulum and gravity, (f) Elasticity. 

Third Term, (g) Liquids, (h) Density and specific gravity, (i) 

Gases. (;') Heat. 
The laboratory is equipped with instruments of foreign and 
American manufacture, such as verniers, micrometers, cathetome- 
ters, a horizontal comparator, a Rater's reversion pendulum, bal- 
ances, etc., and with all apparatus necessary to perform from 10 to 
20 experiments under each of the above named groups. 



MATHEMATICS. 

PROFESSOR SMITH. u 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR CRENSHAW. 
INSTRUCTOR PATRICK. 
ASSISTANT FEAGIN. 

The subjects taught in the different classes in this 

department are as follows : 
Feeshman Class. Algebra through quadratic equa- 




s 



56 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



tions and logarithms, plane geometry (six books Went- 
worth), original solutions of exercises. 

Sophomore Class. Algebra completed, solid geom- 
etry, plane and spherical trigonometry, surveying, men- 
suration. 

Junior Class. Analytical geometry, descriptive 
geometry. 

Senior Class.— Differential and integral Calculus: 

Two objects are sought to be attained : first, mental 

I discipline; second, a thorough knowledge of the princi- 

Ptes of pure mathematics and their practical applica- 
tions. 

Theoretical and practical instruction is given to the 
sophomore class in farm, town and government land 
| surveying, dividing land, mapping, plotting, and com- 

puting areas, etc. ; also in the theory, adjustment and 
{ use of instruments. 

. The class in sections of six or eight, devote three 
afternoons a week ^firing the second and third terms to 
field practice. •■ ; 

Mensuration includes an extended course in measure- 
ments of heights and distances, plane, rectilinear, and 
curvilinear figures, surfaces and volumes. 

The completion of this course, common to all stu- 
dents, lays the foundation for the pure and applied 
mathematics of the mechanical and engineering courses. 
Analytical geometry, descriptive geometry, and calculus 
are pursued in the engineering courses. Especial atten- 
tion isy ven to their practical applications. 

During the entire course, instruction in text-books 
is supplemented by lectures. Solutions of original prac- 
tical problems are required of the student, to make him 

familiar with the application of the principles and for- 
mulas. 



* 



I 



vX^ 



\ 



II1JPPHPMHIU1 I* IlinilMRMMMIPMI 



m~^:rm* 






^ 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



57 



Text-Books. 



Wentworth's Algebra, Wentworth's Geometery, Wentworth's Trig- 
onometry and Surveying, Wentworth's Analytical Geometry, 
Faunce's Descriptive Geometry, Nicholson's Calculus, Johnson's Dif- 
ferential Equations, Osborne's Problems, Peck's Determinants. 



GEOLOGY AND BOTANY. 

PROFESSOR MELL. 

Geology. — This subject is studied in the senior class, 
and extends through the entire session. Special atten- 
tion is given to the geology of Alabama, and many illus- 
trations are drawn from the coal and iron fields and 
other natural deposits of minerals in the State. Mineral 
springs, the origin of ore deposits, and the geological 
relations of soils are carefully studied. 

There is also a course of advanced work in practical 
geology for post-graduate students. This subject is 
pursued by applicants for the degrees of master of 
science and mining engineer. 

The junior class in civil engineering studies miner- 
alogy through the entire session. This work consists of 
a thorough course in blow-pipe analysis of the ordinary 
minerals, and lectures upon crystallography, with in- 
struction how to measure crystals and determine the 
physical constants of minerals. An effort is made to 
familiarize the student with all the economic ores and 
the rocks entering. into the composition of soils. 

Botany.— The students of the sophomore class begin 
the study of botany the first of March, and continue it 
through the session. Analytical work is made an im- 
portant feature. This class is provided with plants 
from the fields, and taught how to determine their spe- 
cific names. The work is sufficiently exhaustive to en- 
able the student, after completing the course, to name 

8 



I 



IP 



— ■ 



58 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



j 



any of the ordinary weeds and grasses that he will en- 
counter in this section. 

In the junior class, in the course of chemistry and 
agriculture, two terms are devoted to systematic and 
structural botany, and to advanced laboratory work 
with the microscope in the preparation of specimens 
showing plant structure; this work is sufficient to 
familiarize the students with the methods of plant 
building and cellular organization. Excellent micro- 
scopes of the most improved patterns, and all necessary 
chemicals and apparatus for preparing and mounting 
vegetable tissues, are used) by the students. 

The third term is devoted to the study of the physiol- 
ogy of plants in order to understand the functions of 
the various organs after completion of the work in the 
histological laboratory. 

FACILITIES FOR WORK. 

Geology. — The department is equipped with models of Mount 
Shasta, the earthquake of 1887 in Japan, glass crystals for teaching 
crystallography; charts and maps of the geology of America and 
Europe; Colt's lantern complete, with oil, oxy-hydrogen and auto- 
matic electric lamps; a large assortment of fine lantern slides repre- 
senting geological formations in this country and abroad; well 
equipped mineralogical laboratory for thirty students, supplied with 
a collection of representative minerals; and models of crystals. 

Botany.— The facilities for teaching this subject are as follows: 
Auzoux's clastic models of seeds and flowers; a large collection of 
pressed plants of Alabama and other sections mounted and cata- 
logued. There is also a laboratory for practical work in botany 
equipped with slate-topped tables for twenty students; dissecting 
and compound microscopes by Zeiss, Leitz, and Bausch & Lomb; 
projection microscopic apparatus; microtomes by King and Bausch 
& Lomb; all the necessary glass ware and smaller dissecting instru- 
ments required in a well equipped laboratory. The Zeiss compound 
microscope used by the professor for experiment work in connection 
with the station is supplied with Abbe's illuminating apparatus, 
slide changers, Abbe's camera lucida, polarizers, apochromatic ob- 
jctives (16 mm, 8 mm, 4 mm, and homogeneous immersion), ocul- 
ars (2, 3, 8, 12, 18,) and photographic eye-piece with micrometer. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



59 



This laboratory, is well lighted with gas and electricity and with a 
good exposure for ample sunlight. 

In connection with the department there is a photographic dark 
room and an excellent photographic outfit, consisting of cameras 
varying in size from 4x5 to 6%x8% inches; Baasch & Lomb's pro- 
fessional photo-micro camera extending to eight f:?t; Zeiss's ana- 
sttemat photographic lens, 6%i8%, fitted with Bausch & Lomb's 
diaphragm shutter, and Zeiss's wide angle lens, 8ftx8%, all mounted 
in aluminum; Clark's lens fitted with diaphragm shutter; Darlot 
lens, 4x5 ; the accessory apparatus and chemicals required for first 
class work in photography. 

The students have access to the botanical garden where experi- 
ments in grass culture and many other plants of interest to the 
farmer are conducted by the professor. 

Text-Books^ 

LeConte's Geology, Williams's Practical Geology, Tarr's Economic 
Geology Dana's Mineralogy, Gray's Botany, Nelson's Herbarium and 
Plant Descriptions, Laboratory Guide, and notes of lectures. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING AND DRAWING. 

PROFESSOR LANE. 

ASSISTANT FEAGIN. 

The special studies in this department begin in the 
junior class, and require a good knowledge of algebra, 
geometry, trigonometry, and analytical mechanics. 

They are as follows : , _-■ 

Junior Class-Simple, compound, versed and para- 

bolical curves, turnouts and crossings, leveling, gradi 

ents, setting slope stakes, etc. 
Special attention will be paid in this class to the lo a 

tion, construction, drainage and ^f^2£SL 
try roads; and the various pavements and foundat.ons 

for the same. v_ <i P fppts. 

Senior Class-Classification, ^^J^ 
seasoning, durability andpreserva ion f tm b « , ; 
fication and description of natural IjW- 
bricks and concretes; cast and ^^£ ^ 
other metals; limes, cements, mortars ana 



60 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



facture; paints and other preservatives; classification 
of stains and a general mathematical discussion of 
same; joints and fastenings; solid and open built beams; 
classification, construction and mechanics of masonry; 
foundations on land and in water; bridges and roofs of 
different kinds, their construction and strains deter- 
mined mathematically and graphically; common roads, 
their coverings, location and construction of railroads; 
navigable, irrigation and drainage canals; river and 
sea-coast improvements. 
Theory and practice are combined in both classes. 

Text-Books. 

Junior Class. — Henck's Field Book for Railway Engineers and 
Byrne's Highway Construction. 

Senior Class. — Wheeler's Civil Engineering and Von Ott's Graphic 
Statics. 

DRAWING. 

All of the students of the freshman and sophomore 
classes are required to take drawing; but only the stu- 
dents in civil engineering in the junior and senior 
classes. 

The freshman class is taught linear and free-hand 
drawing. The sophomore class is instructed in the 
principles of orthographic and isometric projections, 
shades, shadows, perspective and tinting. In the 
junior class the instruction embraces a more extended 
course in orthographic and isometric drawing, perspec- 
tive, shades and tinting; also sketches of tools and 
machines, plans and elevations and cross-sections of 
buildings, and blue prints. The senior class makes 
topographical drawings, and drawings of machines, 
roofs, bridges, etc., to different scales, and blue prints. 
Plans, profiles and sections of railroad surveys com- 
plete the instruction in this department. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



61 



Text-Books . 

Freshman Class. — Kitchener's Geometrical Note Book, Thome's 
Junior Course in Mechanical Drawing, and Davidson's Model Draw- 
ing. 

Sophomore Class. — Davidson's Projections, Davidson's Practical 

Perspective, Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. 

Junior Class. — Davidson's Building Construction, Davidson's 
Drawing for Mechanics and Engineers, Plates belonging to the Col- 
lege, Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. 

Senior Class. — French, English and American plates belonging to 
the College, Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. 



ENGLISH AND POLITICAL ECONOMY. 

PROFESSOR THACH. 

ACTING PROFESSOR FAULKNER 
ASSISTANT SCROGGS. 

OBJECTS AND METHODS. 

In this department the students pursue a systematic 
course in the English language and literature. 

Language is the avenue of approach to all knowledge ; 
the interpretation of words is the fundamental process 
in education of whatsoever kind. A full course in Eng- 
lish is, therefore, considered especially important in 
the technical courses of study that do not include the 
ancient classics. Accordingly, the course of English is 
continued throughout the four years of the college cur- 
riculum, three hours a week, and is made obligatory 
upon all students, with the exception of those pursuing 
the first two years of the course in Latin. In this ex- 
tended drill in the grammar and literature of the Eng- 
lish language, the endeavor is made to afford a train- 
ing somewhat equivalent to the ordinary course in the 

Classical talVM _ . in languages , especially in their 
In view of the ill preparation e Jf j ^ f _ r Amission 

mother tongue, exhibited by many of the candid £ ft* aft m Won 
to the freshman class, it is deemed advuabta, for the sake 



62 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute). 



work, to devote a portion of the first year to grounding such stu- 
dents in the principles of grammar. 

Especial attention is given to the study of the writings, them- 
selves, of leading English authors, since direct contact with litera- 
ture is considered more profitable than information merely about 
literature. 

All students before classed as ^regular in any course leading to a 
degree must conform to all the requirements in English for admis- 
sion as set forth on page 34. 

For requirements as to thesis and as to proficiency in English for 
certificates and degrees see pages 41 and 97. 

Declamation and themes (or orations) are required of all regular 
students. For details see below. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

Freshman Class. — Five hours a week; study of grammar, the prin- 
ciples of special and general composition, with frequent brief papers 
illustrating the laws studied; study of American authors; Irving, 
Hawthorne, Holmes, Poe, Bryant, Longfellow. 

Swinton's English Grammar, Lockwood's Rhetoric, Kellogg & 
Reed's English Language. 

Sophomore Class. — Three hours a week; study of style, analysis of 
selections of prose and poetry, frequent essays on historic and liter- 
ary themes. 

Carpenter's Rhetoric, Genung's Rhetorical Analysis, Syle's From 
Milton to Tennyson. 

Junior Class.— Three hours a week; lectures on the history of 
English literature, critical study of English classics, essays. 

Pancoast's History of English Literature; Pancoast's Standard 
English Poems; Macaulay, Carlyle, DeQuincey, etc. 

Senior Class.— Two hours a week, first term. Principles of Criti- 
cism, Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, Hamlet, etc., Dowden's Shakes- 
peare, etc. 

THEMES AND ORATIONS. 

Theory without practice is as fruitless in the study of English as 
in any other department of study. Practical work is indispensable 
to the successful teaching of English. 

Besides numerous brief papers illustrative of the spbject matter 
of the text-books, set themes or orations are required of all stu- 
dents: — For the freshman class, ten themes a year; ten for the 
sophomore; for the senior and junior classes, three orations each. 

DECLAMATION. 

The old practice of committing pieces to memory for "speaking" is 
cultivated as a means, both of training in the art of thinking on the 

j 



V 



w 



1 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



63 



feet, and of storing the mind with the diction of finished specimens 
of English style. 

The sophomore class is heard weekly throughout the year in sec- 
tions of ten, once for an hour and a half in rehearsal, afterwards 
in the study-hall before the body of students. 

The senior and junior classes also deliver their orations in public. 

PHILOSOPHY AND POLITICAL ECONOMY. 

The senior class pursues the study of intellectual 
science, twice a week, through the year; and political 
economy twice a week, during the last two terms. The 
instruction in this department is by lectures in com- 
bination with text-books. 

Intellectual Science. — Psychology defined. Value in relation to 
moral culture, education, and Natural Sciences. The relation of 
the soul to matter. The arguments of the Materialist. Counter ar- 
guments. The Faculties of the Soul. The nature of Consciousness. 
Sense Perception. Fancy. Imagination. Nature of Conceptions. 
Language. Judgment. Reasoning. Deduction. Induction, etc. 
Porter's Intellectual Science. 

Political Economy.— Value; production of wealth; land; labor; 
capital; division of labor; distribution of wealth; wages; trades- 
union; tariff; education, etc. Lectures by Professor. Walker' s Polit- 
ical Economy. 

A Post-graduate Course has also been established in English. The 

following courses have been given: 

(1) Shakespeare.— Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, Merchant of Venice, 
As You Like It, Henry IV. Part I. Richard III., King John. 

(2) Dryden— Poetical Works (Christie); Essay of Dramatic 
Poesy (Thomas Arnold); Essay on Satire, etc., (Yonge); Salis- 
bury's Life of Dryden. , 

Pope-Poetical Works (Ward); Satires (Pattison); Stephens 
Life of Pope, Gosse's From Shakespeare to Pope and 18th Century 

Literature 
3) English Literature of the Eighteenth Century: Addison, Pope, 

Gray, Goldsmith, Burns, Cowper, Burke. 
(4) American Literature: Longfellow, Lowell, Poe. 



f 



Y 



G4 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



CHEMISTRY. 

■ • 

PROFESSOR ROSS. 

INSTRUCTOR HARE. 
INSTRUCTOR HOUGHTON. 

Instruction in this department embraces — 

1. A course of lectures in general chemistry. 

2. A course of lectures in industrial chemistry. 
2. A course of lectures in agricultural chemistry. 

4. Systematic laboratory -work in connection with 
each course of lectures, for the practice of chemical 
analysis and chemical research. 

1. Course in general chemistry: This consists of a 
series of lectures (three per week) extending through- 
out the entire session, and includes a discussion of the 
fundamental principles of chemical philosophy in con- 
nection with the history, preparation, properties and 
compounds of the metallic and non-metallic elements, 
witli the main facts and principles of organic chemis- 
try. In this course the more common applications of 
chemistry to the arts and manufactures are discussed. 
The apparatus used for experimental illustration is ex- 
tensive, containing the newest and approved improve- 
ments necessary for presenting the subject in the most 
attractive and instructive form. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Roscoe & Schorlemmer, Fownes, Frankland, Remsen, Cooke's 
Chemical Philosophy, Chemical Journals. 

2. Lectures on industrial chemistry (three per week) 
extend throughout the session, and include a discussion 
in detail of the processes and chemical principles in- 
volved in the most important applications of chemistry 
in the arts and manufactures to the reduction of ores, 
the preparation of materials, for food and drink, for 
clothing, shelter, illumination, cleansing, purifying, 
writing, printing, etc. 





CHEMICAL LABORATORY INTERIORS 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



65 



These lectures are amply illustrated by means of suit- 
able specimens of raw materials and manufactured pro- 
ducts, together with models and diagrams. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Wagner's Chemical Technology, Muspratt's Chemistry as applied 
to Arts and Manufacturing, Ure's Dictionary, Watt's Dictionary, 
Richardson and Watt's Chemical Technology, Percy's Metallurgy, 
Sadtler's Industrial Organic Chemistry. 

3. Course in agricultural chemistry : This consists of 
lectures on chemistry in its applications to agriculture 
(two per week), and includes a thorough discussion of 
the origin, composition and classification of soils, the 
composition and growth of plants, the sources of plant 
food and how obtained, the improvement of soils, the 
manufacture and use of fertilizers, the chemical prin- 
ciples involved in the rotation of crops, the feeding of 
live stock, and the various operations carried on by the 
intelligent and successful agriculturist. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Johnson's. How Crops Grow and How Crops Feed, Lupton's Ele- 
mentary Principles of Scientific Agriculture, Johnson and Cameron's 
Elements of Agricultural Chemistry, Storer's Agriculture in rela- 
tion to Chemistry, scientific journals, reports of the United States 
Department of Agriculture, and the bulletins and reports of the 
various home and foreign agricultural departments and stations. 

4. The course of systematic laboratory work : This 
course of practical work in the laboratory is carried on 
in connection with each course of lectures, and em- 
braces the practical operations of chemical analysis and 
synthesis, being varied somewhat to suit the individual 
object of the student. 

The laboratories which are open from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m., during 
six days in the week, are amply supplied with everything necessary 
for instruction in chemical manipulation, in the qualitative and 
quantitative analysis of soils, fertilizers, feed stuffs, sugar products, 
minerals, mineral waters, technical products, etc., and in the method 
of prosecuting chemical researches. Unusual facilities are offered 
to students who wish to devote their time, to the special study of 
practical chemistry. 
9 



s 




66 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



Each student on entering the chemical laboratory is furnished 
with a work table, a set of re-agent bottles, and the common re- 
agents and apparatus used in qualitative and quantitative analysis. 

At the close of the session he will be credited with such articles as 
may be returned in good order; the value of those which have been 
injured or destroyed will be deducted from his contingent fee. 

In addition to the analytical work above described, it is designed 
to give during the session a short course in electro-plating. Prac- 
tical instruction in the electro-deposition of nickel, silver, gold, etc., 
upon other metals will be given, and, in addition, the application of 
electrolysis to chemical analysis will be studied both theoretically 
and practically. 

Text-Books. 

In qualitative analysis — Jones's Fresenius Plattner. 

In quantitative analysis — Fresenius, Sutton, Rose, Bunsen, Rick- 
ett's Notes on Assaying, Mitchell's Manual of Practical Assaying. 

In agricultural chemical analysis — Official methods of the Asso- 
ciation of Agricultural Chemists, Wiley's principles and Practice of 
Agricultural Analysis. 

CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

[For description of the building see page 14.] 

The chemical apparatus recently purchased for the laboratory con- 
sists of a full supply of the most approved instruments for practical 
work and investigation. The building is supplied with water and 
gas and every appliance required to meet the demands of modern 
scientific instruction and research. In addition to the apparatus 
usually supp/ied to first-class laboratories, there have been imported 
a new and improved Schmidt and Hensch's polariscope, four short- 
arm Becker balances of latest pattern, Bunsen spectroscope, Zeiss 
miscroscope, and other instruments for delicate and accurate work. 



HISTORY AND LATIN. 

PPtOFESSOR PETRIE. 

INSTRUCTOR PATRICK. 
ASSISTANT ADAMS. 

HISTORY. 

In this department the aim is not so much to memo- 
rize facts as to understand them. Strong emphasis is 
laid on the fact that history is not a succession of iso- 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 67 

lated facts but a progressive whole, each event being at 
once the cause and the effect of other events. The stu- 
dents are taught to investigate the growth of ideas and 
institutions, the rise and progress of great historical 
movements and the reciprocal influences of men and cir- 
cumstances. Frequent use is made of diagrams, photo- 
graphs, charts and maps, with which the department is 
well equipped. Constant practice in map drawing is in- 
sisted on in order to give precision to the geographical 
knowledge acquired. Instruction is given by text-books, 
lectures and class discussion, but a constant effort is 
made to stimulate to wider reading and research in the 
library. 

In the freshman class, the subjects studied are the 
United States, Alabama, and England. The first term 
(two hours per week) is devoted to the history and gov- 
ernment of the United States, the second term (two 
hours per week) to Alabama, and the third term (three 
hours per week) to the history of England. 

In the sophomore class (three hours per week until 
March ) the subject studied is general European history. 

In the junior and senior classes opportunity for special historical' 
work is given to those students of the General Course who may 
elect it instead of laboratory work. During the session of 1900-01 
the work will be in American history, social, political and constitu- 
tional. 

A series of lectures will be given on American statesmen, includ- 
ing amongst others such Southern men as Randolph, Davis, Steph- 
ens, Toombs and Yancey. Lectures will also be given on important 
points in our history, including: The Failure of the Confederation; 
The Ordinance of 1787; The Constitutional Convention; The War 
of 1812; The Missouri Compromise; The Monroe Doctrine; Texas 
and Mexico; The Compromise of 1850; The Kansas-Nebraska 
Struggle; Secession. 

The students will investigate under the direction of the professor 
topics connected with the lectures and will record the results of their 
research in note books. These records will be made the basis of 
general class discussion. 

Graduate students are expected to take part in the junior and 




68 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



J 



- 



senior discussions and in addition wiil meet with the professor for 
conference in regard to their work. Those who take history as 
their major subject are expected to devote a large part of their time 
to original research upon some topic on which they can consult the 
original sources of information. They are also required to pursue 
a prescribed course of reading as indicated below: 

Text-Books. 

Freshman Class. — Cooper, Estill & Lemmon's History of the United 
States. Thorpe & McCorvey's Civil Government in the United States 
and Alabama, Montgomery's English History. 

Sophomore Class.— Myers's General History. 

Junior and Senior Classes. — Moore's American Congress. 

Graduate Course— Wilson's Division and Reunion, selected parts 
of Stephen's Constitutional History, and of Rhodes's History of the 
United States, Fiske's Critical Period, Lodge's Hamilton, Morse's 
Jefferson, Schurz's Clay, Lodge's Webster, Sumner's Andrew Jack- 
son. 

LATIN. ] 

The objects kept in view in this department are : An 
accurate knowledge of the forms and syntax; a famili- 
arity with Latin words, their etymology and their Eng- 
lish derivatives ; an appreciation of Latin literature and 
an intelligent conception of Roman history and civiliza- 
tion both in themselves and in their effect on the modern 
world. 

A systematic course of instruction is given In the forms and syn- 
tax. These are taught both deductively from a grammar and in- 
ductively from the text read. Translation is constantly practiced, 
sometimes at sight, sometimes after being assigned for preparation. 
English passages based on a familiar author or illustrative of special 
constructions are put in Latin, both orally and in writing. Great 
emphasis is laid on the etymology of the words in the text read. 

In connection with every author studied in class a course of read- 
ing in Engine is prescribed descriptive of his life, work and times. 

I % n J SetUng and the literary vaIue of h * writings are 
carefully discussed and frequent comparisons are made with modern 
authors. 

j£ 'T beD ? fit ,° f StUd6ntS Wh ° d0 not stud y the ^tin language a 
senes o popular lectures will be given upon the great Latin writers. 
Especial emphas.s is laid on proficiency in writing Latin exercises 
and in translating Latin prose at sight. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



Text-Books. 



69 



Freshman Class. — Allen & Greenough's Grammar, Exercises, 
Nepos. 

Sophomore Class. — Cicero, Allen & Greenough's Grammar, Exer- 
cises. - , 

Junior Class — Virgil,Horace, Allen & Grenough's Grammar, Exer- 
cises, Allen's History of Rome, Wilkins's Roman Antiquities. 

Senior Class. — Livy, Tacitus, Wilkins's Latin Literature, Exercises. 



MODERN LANGUAGES. 

ACTING PROFESSOR FAULKNER. 

The following regular courses are given in French 
and German: 

French — First Year : Three recitations a week. Dur- 
ing this year the principal object is to acquire a knowl- 
edge of the elements of grammar and a correct pronun- 
ciation, together with a facility in translating ordinary 
French. Reading is begun at an early stage, and the 
principles of grammar are illustrated and impressed 
by frequent exercises in rendering English into French. 

Second Year : Three recitations a week. During this 
year almost the same line of work is pursued as that be- 
gun in the previous year. More difficult and varied 
French is read, and instruction is given upon the laws 
of grammar, the construction of the language, and the 
history of the literature. Special attention is given to 
sight translation. ► 

German Two Years : Three recitations a week the 

first vear, three a week the second year. In this course 
the aim and the methods are similar to those in French. 

Text-Books. 

French— First Year : French Principia, Pts. I ft II; Jules Verne's 
Michel Strogoff, Rogers's Sight Reading in French. 

Second Year: Feuillet's Le Roman d'un Jeune Homme Pauvre, 
Dumas' La Tulipe Noire; French Composition. 






-■-> 



70 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



/ 



German— First Year: Harris's German Lessons; Super's Elemen- 
tary German Reader, Zschokke's Der Zerbrochene Krug. 

Second Year: Schiller's Ballad's, Hauff's Das Kalte Herz; Bern- 
hardt's German Composition. 



^ 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

PROFESSOR DUNSTAN. 

INSTRUCTOR KYSER. 
ASSISTANT MCDONNELL. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 



The students in this course will study English, French or German, 
Physics, Mathematics, etc., as now prescribed for the course of Civil 
Engineering in the junior and senior years and in addition thereto 
will prosecute their studies in electricity and mechanics as herein • 
prescribed. 

First Term : Four hours per week are devoted to 
study of the principles of electricity and magnetism, 
with especial reference to their industrial applications. 
The subject of electrical measurements is also treated in 
detail. 

Second Term: Incandescent lightning, four hours 
per week. 

Third Term: Arc lighting and wiring four hours per 
week. 

Text-Books. 

Ayrton's Practical Electricity. Houston and Kennelly's Incandes- 
cent and Arc Lighting. Cushing's Standard Wiring. 

Laboratory Work. — Four hours per week are given 
to work in the laboratory. This included management 
of batteries, construction of instruments, electro-plating, 
electrical measurements, verification of the principles 
upon which the measurements of current, electromotive 
force and resistance are based, etc. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term : Dynamo electric machinery, five hours 
per week. *\ 



\ * 





•; J 



ELECTRICAL BUILDING. 



M* 



-—- y 



C 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



71 



Second Term: Alternating currents and alternating 
current machinery. 

Third Term: Polyphase machinery and power trans- 
mission, five hours per week. 

Text-Books. 

Dynamo Electric Machinery, Thompson. Alternating Currents, 
Franklin and Williamson. Standard Polyphase Apparatus, Oudin. 

Laboratory Work. — Six hours per week are devoted 
to practical laboratory work, electrical measurements, 
relation of electrical currents to heat and mechanical 
work, care and tests of dynamo and motors, calibration 
of voltmeters, ammeters and watt-meters, electric light- 
ing, management and care of accumulators, energy con- 
sumed in lamps, adjustment and care of arc lamps, 
proper wiring of buildings, the application of electricity 
to street railways, magnetic measurements, tests of 
transformers and alternating motors, etc. 

Drawing and Construction.— Two hours per week 
in the senior year are devoted to the design and con- 
struction of electrical machinery. 

Encouragement is offered to advanced students for conducting 
original investigations, and opportunity is taken to stimulate a spirit 
of scientific inquiry. Courses of reading are suggested to such stu- 
dents in connection with their experimental work. 

In addition to the usual laboratory work senior stu- 
dents spend a portion of their time in the boiler room, 
learning the management and care of the steam plant, 
and in turn take charge of the lighting plant, thus be- 
coming familiar with running the engines and dynamos. 

Post Graduate Course. — To graduate students more 
advanced courses in the theory and applications of alter- 
nating currents and alternating current machinery are 
"■iven. The courses will be varied slightly from year to 
year to suit the needs of those taking the course. 

In connection with this work suitable laboratory work 
will be given- x 



rt 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



Iff 1 





Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



73 



EQUIPMENT. 

The electrical laboratory has a complete line of batteries, call- 
bells, annunciators, telegraph sounders, relays, keys, magnets; gal- 
vanometers, resistance boxes, electro-plating apparatus, and all ap- 
paratus for students in electrical engineering. The equipment com- 
prises many fine instruments of precision: Lord Kelvin's standard 
100 ampere balance (either for direct or alternating currents) ; 
Lord Kelvin's graded current galvanometer, reading 600 amperes; 
also, his graded potential galvanometer, reading 600 volts; Weston 
alternating current voltmeter, Weston direct reading watt-meter, 
Queen's "Acme" testing set, Kelvin electro-static voltmeter, Cardew 
voltmeter (for direct or alternating currents), reading to 150 volts; 
Weston's standard ammeter and voltmeter, box of resisting coils; 
Queen's magnetic vane voltmeter, and ammeter, standard micro- 
farad condenser and Sabine key; Thompson's watt-meter, ballistic 
reflecting galvanometer, mirror galvanometer, Fein ammeter and 
voltmeter, Ayrton & Perry ammeter, Thomson inclined coil amme- 
ter, Edison ammeters, Kohl's solenoid ammeter, Wood ammeter, 
Deprez ammeter Hartman & Braun voltmeter, D'Arsonval galvano- 
meter, Rowland-D'Arsonval galvanometer, cable testing apparatus, 
Hughe's induction balance, tasimeter, microphone, telephones, elec- 
trolytic apparatus and several mirror and other galvanometers for 
first year students. 

In the dynamo room the following are installed: One Weston 150 
volt, 20 ampere dynamo, with rheostat; one Brush 6 arc light dyna- 
mo, with regulator and six lamps; one Ideal 5 kilo- watt three phase 
alternator; one Thompson-Houston 9 arc light dynamo with lamps; 
one Edison compound wound 12 kilo- watt generator; a Thomson- 
Houston 110 volt, 75 ampere generator; two street car motors used as 
either direct or alternating current generators or motors; two poly- 
phase induction motors; one General Electric 5 horse-power induc- 
tion motor mounted on cradle dynamometer; General Electric 20 
horse-power motor; one Stanley induction motor with condensers; 
Edison 3% kilo-watt generator; a Crocker-Wheeler one horse-power 
motor and rheostat, and one bi-phase alternator, and 500 volt genera- 
tor, made by special students, furnish current to laboratory, and 
light up the different buildings. A lamp board with a capacity of 
210 lamps has been installed and is used for testing purposes. 

The dynamos occupy a separate brick building, 50x32 feet, and 
are operated by a 35-horse power Westinghouse vertical engine, and 
a 25 horse-power Atlas engine. 

This department, being provided with Lord Kelvin's standard elec- 
trical instruments for exact measurements, will calibrate, free of ex- 
pense, and ammeter or voltmeter that may be sent to the College. 

An electric motor made by students, supplied with current from 




74 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



a generator at a distance of 3,000 feet, operates a gin, gin press, ensi- 
lage cutter and fed cutter at the experiment station farm. This 
motor not only subserves a useful purpose in the operation of these 
machines, but is an excellent illustration of the electric transmis- 
sion of power. 






y 



♦ 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND MECHANIC 

ARTS. 

PROFESSOR WILMORE. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR CRENSHAW . 
INSTRUCTOR TRAMMKLL. 
INSTRUCTOR FULL AN. 

The course in manual training covers three years, as 
follows: first year, wood-working— carpentry and turn- 
ing; second year, pattern making and foundry and forge 
work— molding, casting and smithing; third year, ma- 
chine Shop— chipping and filing and machine work in 
metals. 

This course is obligatory upon the students of the 
two lower classes. For satisfactory reasons a student 
may be excused from this laboratory work by the Fac- 
ulty. 

The full work of each class is six hours per week, in 
three exercises of two hours each. 

The power for running the apparatus in this department is de- 
rived from a twenty-five horse-power Harris-Corliss automatic en- 
gine which is supplied with steam by a thirty horse-power steel hori- 
zontal tubular boiler. A steam pump and a heater for the feed water 
form a part of the steam apparatus. For the steam plant a substan- 
tial brick boiler-house and chimney have been erected 

The equipment for the wood-working shop comprises the follow- 
ing: 30 wood-working benches, each with complete set of carpen- 
ters tools; 24 turning-lathes, 10-inch swing, each with complete set 
of tools; 1 double circular saw; 1 band saw; 1 board-planing ma- 
chine; 1 jointer; 1 pattern-maker's lathe, 16-inch swing- 1 36-inch 
grindstone. The tool room is supplied with a variety of extra hand- 
too s for special work, and in addition to the regular carpenter's 
tools in the benches, each student is supplied with a set of chisels and 



r 





WOOD ROOM 



^^^ 



< 



tf 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



75 



plane irons with a locker to keep them in and is held responsible 
for their care and condition. 

The equipment for. the foundry consists of molding benches for 
18 students, each supplied with a complete set of molder's tools; a 
23-inch Colliau cupola, with all modern improvements, capable of 
melting 2,000 pounds of iron per hour; a brass furnace in which can 
be melted 100 pounds of brass at a heat, with a set of crucible tongs, 
etc. Also a full suppy of ladles, large and small moulding flasks, a 
foundry crane, special tools, etc. 

The forge shop equipment consists of 16 hand forges of new pat- 
tern,' each with a set of smith's tools, anvil, etc. The blast for all 
the forges is supplied by a No. 3 Sturtevant steel pressure blower 
(which also furnishes blast for the foundry cupola), and a No. 15 
Sturtevant exhaust blower draws the smoke from the fires into the 
smoke-flues and forces it out through the chimney. 

The machine department occupies a brick building, 30x50 feet, and 
is equipped with eight engine-lathes, (screw-cutting, 14-inch swing, 
6-foot bed; 2 engine lathes 16-inch swing, (one with taper attach- 
ment) ; 1 engine lathe, 18-inch swing, with compound rest and taper 
attachment); 1 speed lathe, 10-inch swing; 1 20-inch drill press 
(power feed); 1 10-inch sensitive drill; 1 15-inch shaper; 1 22-inch x 
22-inch x 5 feet planer; 1 universal milling machine; 1 corundum 
tool grinder, (14-inch wheel); 1 bench grinder; 1 post drill press, 
14-inch universal cutter and reamer grinder; 1 Brown and Sharpe 
universal grinding machine; 1 power hack saw. A part of the room 
is set apart for vise-work, chipping and filing; and benches for 12 
students are provided, each with vise and set of files, chisels, ham- 
mers etc. In the tool-room is to be found a good supply of machin- 
ists' tools for general shop use, such as lathe and drill chucks, drills, 
reamers, taps, dies, gauges, files, cutting and measuring tools, and 
special appliances for machine work, with machine for grinding 
twist drills. 

The nature of the work in each department is as 
follows : 

First Year. 

I. A course of carpentry or hand work covering the first two 
terms. The lessons include instruction in the nature and use of 
tools, instruction and practice in shop drawing, elementary work 
with plane, saw, chisel, different kinds of joints, timber splices, cross 
joints, mortise and tenon, mitre and frame work, dovetail work, com- 
prising different kinds of joints used in cabinet making, light cabi- 
net work examples in building, framing, roof-trusses, etc. 

II. A course in turning, extending through the third term. The 
lessons comprise, nature ana use of lathe and tools, plain 



76 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



straight turning, caliper work to different diameters and lengths, 
simple and compound curves, screw plate and check work, hollow 
and soherical turning. 

Second Yeab. 

I. Course in forge work in iron and steel, occupying the first term. 
The lessons are arranged so that the students in making the series of 
objects, become familiar with the nature of the metals and the suc- 
cessive steps in working them by hand into simple and complex 
forms, as drawing, upsetting, bending, cutting, punching, welding 
by various methods, tool-forging, tempering, hardening, etc. 

II. A course in pattern-making covering the second term. The 
work includes a variety of examples of whole and split patterns, 
core work, etc., giving the students familiarity with the use of pat- 
terns for general molding. 

.III. A course in molding and casting in iron and brass occupying 
the third term. The work consists for the most part of small 
articles, such as light machine parts, but a sufficient variety of forms 
are introduced for the student to acquire a good general and prac- 
tical knowledge of the usual methods and appliances used in light 
foundry work. Most of the work is in green sand in two part 
flasks; core work is also given, and some three part flask and some 
dry sand work is introduced. 

The same patterns which have been previously made by students 
are used, besides special patterns for occasional larger or more com- 
plicated work. Instruction and practice is given in working the 
cupola. 

In connection with this second year work, a series of lectures is 
given on the metallurgy and working of the metals used in the in- 
dustrial arts, cast and wrought iron, steel, brass, etc. 

Third Yeab. 

I. A course of chipping and filing, covering the first term. The 
lessons comprise work on cast and wrought iron; chipping to line 
on flat and curved surfaces, key-seating, etc., filing and finishing to 
line (straight and curved), surface filing and finishing, fitting slot- 
ting, dovetail work, sawing, pin and screw filing, surface finishing 
with scraper, etc. 

II. Machine work occupying the remainder of the year The work 
includes cast and wrought iron, steel and brass; turning to various 
diameters and lengths, taper turning, facing with chuck and face 
plate, drilling-both in lathe and drill press,-reaming boring 
screw-cutting in lathe and with taps and dies, planing, slotting, etc.! 
with planer and shaper, milling various forms with the milling ma- 

^IL^/m eXe 7 lSeS ^ makinS ** reamers ' «*" tttinr. 
grinding, polishing, etc 




I 



I 






c< 



» 





_ 



r 






2 >» 



^* •'5E , «'*'* , ^ : 2'*- 



->g,0 



<0 



2; Jo. W 



5fe§ 



a- 









*«o cyukttt^v j£**> 



o I a J «• 

__j 



" I 1 5 B 

J < 

o 

J 

o 

l 1 ° 

o 

* 



fTTh 



□ -. 



7" 



BJ3"I 



L 



/■ 



r^ 



u, 



m 

t u u 

o J L 






«/> 



to 
II- 



UJ 

o 



nnl FrTrTll frTnl * frTn 

1' N W\ 

ju ilujijb |uu] |u_y 

J U ' 



=^ 





V 





© 



00 i 



9 O O J) U 
j-i n ■♦-» H ZSf 



T H O M O 



aS U 



♦ 



I 



nix 



* "N^ » 



t 







Alabama Polttechnio Institute. 77 

« 

Lectures are also given during the year on various subjects con- 
nected with machine work in metals; such as forms, construction 
and use of the various machines, cutting tools, gearing, gauges, 
screw threads, etc. During the last term some piece of construction 
work is given the classes. 

All of the work is done from blue prints made by the class in 
drawing. In the construction work, the student is given a blue print 
and the material for a certain part. He is then encouraged to study 
the work and plan the best method of doing it. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Elementary Mechanics.— Three hours a week for the 
first term are devoted to this subject. The fundamental 
laws underlying all mechanical science and the me- 
chanics of liquids, gases and vapors are studied. 

Principles of Mechanism.— Three recitations per 
week during the second and third terms are devoted to 

^indT^thifhead machines are analyzed and ^eir elementary com- 
binations of mechanism studied. The commun j c f h i0n fl lXt°ways 
gear wheels, belts, cams, screws and link-work, the dWemt W 
of obtaining definite velocity ratios and definite changes o, Mj g 
parallel motions and quick return motions as weUi a _ the design ng 
of trains of mechanism for various pu rpo ses togethe r w ith h 
theoretical forms of teeth for gear wheels to tru*m Utte mot 

through these trains, ™ *S^ J^ffSU »*• 

Mechanical Drawing.— During the first term * 

drawings to exact scale, of ^LTmSwa^w^tch- from, 
dent takes his own measurements and maKes nis. 
which to make the finished drawing. b in . 

An elementary course of machine *«** *f£j * £ yea r. 
ning of the second term and continued tin the end^ ^ ^ 
Some comparatively simple machine is se lecteo i 
its details. Careful attention is given to tte SUWB » ^.^ rf 
and their mechanical arrangement witn t* ' dra wings of a 

manufacture. An actual machine or »e those obtained 

machine are obtained, the dimensions compared w ^ 

by applying the theoretical formulas, and the causes 

between the two studied. consist of hand work 

Laboratory Worfc.-The laboratory worK w ^^ ^ me . 

in iron and machine work in iron, as give 
chanlc arts in the third year. 






78 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

Text-Books. 

Wood's Elementary Mechanics; Stahl and Wood's Elementary- 
Mechanism. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Mechanical Engineering of Power Plants. — The first 
term five hours per week is given to the study of the 
practical applications of steam machinery. It is be- 
lieved that a thorough knowledge of the apparatus in ac- 
tual practical use is the best preparations a student can 
have for the study of the theory, and to that end, the dif- 
ferent types of engines, boilers, pumps, condensers, and 
other auxiliary apparatus are taken up and studied in 
detail, and the advantages and disadvantages of each 
discussed. Extensive files of manufacturer's catalogues 
are kept and the technical papers and magazines in the 
library are freely used in order to keep in touch with the 
latest and best practice in engineering work. 

Steam Engine.— The second term five hours per week 
will be given to the study of the theory and efficiency of 
the steam engine, with discussions of the effects of con- 
densation in cylinder, action of fly wheels, effects of 
jacketing, etc. Simple and compound engines, various 
valves and cut-off motions, and the principal types of 
modern engines are studied. Special attention is given 
to the steam engine indicator. 

Graphical Statics of Mechanism.-Six weeks of the third term, 
five hours per week, will be given to the study of this subject. The 
advantage of graphical over analytical methods is general recog- 
nized, and new applications of the former are constantly being made. 
By its use, the forces acting in every part of a machine may be de- 
termined, both in direction and intensity, without the use of a 
mathematical formula. 

During the remainder of the third term, a series of lectures on 
mechanical refrigeration and gas engines is given. 

Machine Design.— The subject of machine design is 
made a continuation of the junior course and runs 



J 






Alabama Polytechnic Institute 



79 



throughout the year, two hours a week. During the 
first term, the strength and proportions of different 

joints and fastenings are studied, and problems given for 
actual solution. During the remainder of the year the 
time is spent on steam engine design. The results as ob- 
tained from standard formulas are compared with the 
dimensions as used by the best constructors, and the 
reasons for variations, if any occur, are studied. 

Laboratory Work. — The students are not only taught how to cali- 
brate and use the different instruments, but they are brought in con- 
tract with engineering appliances under practical working con- 
ditions. 

Thoroughness of work is sought rather than the performance of a 
large number of experiments. 

The following course has been arranged : 

Calibration of steam gauge; calibration of indicator spring; cali- 
bration of thermometer; calibration of scales and balances; calori- 
meter tests with barrel separating and throttling calorimeters; 
boiler test with determination of the quality of steam and analysis 
of flue gas; efficiency test of engine with brake and indicator power 
measurement; test of hot air pumping engine; efficiency and duty 
of a steam pump; tensional, compressional and transverse tests of 
cast iron, wrought iron, steel and wood, in which are observed the 
limit of elasticity, the ultimate breaking strength and the modulus 
of elasticity. 

This class usually makes a test of some electric plant or mill some 
time in the last term. 

The apparatus for carrying on this work consists of 45 horse- 
power Imperial cross compound engine, especially arranged for ex- 
perimental work, supplied with Wheeler surface condenser and 
Deane air pump and circulating pump, of a 25 horse-power Harris- 
Corliss engine, a 35 horee-power Westinghouse engine, a 25 horse- 
power Atlas engine, two 9 horse-power engines, constructed by stu- 
dents in the shops, a small engine and boiler especially for making 
efficiency tests, a duplex Deane steam pump, an Ericsson hot air 
engine, a Westinghouse air pump, four steam engine indicators, a 
separating calorimeter, pyrometers, scales, a standard steam gauge 
with apparatus for testing steam gauges, a Crosby dead weight tester 
for correcting the standad gauge, a 35,000-pound testing machine, 
and Henning micrometer extensometer, a Carpenter calorimeter 
with auxiliary apparatus for determining the heating value of dif- 
ferent fuels, a draft gauge, and a Henning pocket recorder. 



80 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



Text-Books. 



Hutton's Mechanical Engineering of Power Plants, Holmes's 
Steam Engine, Herrman-Smith's Graphical Statics of Mechanism; 
Unwin's Machine Design. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

The Library contains a number of standard works on the various 
subjects studied, and the students are referred to them constantly 
for more extended treatment of many points that come up in class. 

POST-GRADUATE COURSE. 

The following course has been aranged and represents the amount 
of work required. Hydraulics may be substituted for thermody- 
namics if the members of the class are unanimous in wishing the 
change. Other substitutions may be made at the option of the pro- 
fessor, provided they represent an equivalent amount of work, and 
are in the general line of the course selected. 

Dynamometers. — This includes dynamometers and the measure- 
ment of power. Absorption and transmission dynamometers are 
studied, with their application and use in testing steam engines. 

Valve Gears. — The different forms of valve gears of steam en- 
gines are studied, and problems in designing gears are worked out. 

Thermodynamics of the Steam Engine. — This subject is studied 
theoretically and practically, and attempts a complete analysis of 
the action of steam in an engine. 

Laboratory Work. — As much advanced laboratory work will be 
given as can be arranged with ine appliances at hand. 

Text-Books. 

Flather's Dynamometers and Measurement of Power, Spangler's 
Valve Gears, Peabody's Thermodynamics of the Steam Engine, Mer- 
riman's Hydraulics. 



AGRICULTURE. 

PROFESSOR DUGGAR. 

Instruction in agriculture is given by means of lec- 
tures, text-books, bulletins of the agricultural experi- 
ment stations, and practical work in field, barn, and 
dairy. 

The study of agriculture begins with the freshman 
class in the third term, and extends through three terms 



/ 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 81 

of the sophomore year and two terms of the junior year. 
The time devoted to this study in the lecture room is 
two hours per week with each class. 

The subjects studied by the freshman class are the 
breeds of horses, cattle, sheep and hogs, — their charac- 
teristics, uses, management and adaptability to the 
South. Practical work in judging live-stock is included 
in the course. Five breeds of cattle and two of hogs are 
represented in the herd maintained by this department. 

The first term of the sophomore year is devoted to 
dairying and to a study of the principles of live-stock 
breeding. Dairying will be taught by practical work in 
the dairy, — butter making, determination of fat in milk 
by the Babcock method, etc., — as well as by instruction 
in the lecture room. 

In the second term of the sophomore year the follow- 
ing subjects are studied : soils — chemical and physical 
properties, defects, and means of improvement ; the con- 
trol of water, including means of conserving moisture in 
times of drought, terracing, underdrainage, and open 
and hillside ditches; objects and methods of cultivation; 
agricultural implements; rotation of crops; and im- 
provement of plants by crossing, selection, and culture. 

The third term of the sophomore year is devoted to 
the staple crops produced in Alabama, to forage plants 
adapted to the South, and to plants valuable for the 
renovation of soils. The more important crops are 
treated with reference to varieties, soil and fertilizer re- 
quirements, methods of planting and cultivating, and 
uses. 

In the junior year the subjects of feeding animals and 
of farm management are studied. Among the topics in- 
cluded under the latter heading are different systems of 
farming and stock growing, farm equipment and build- 
ings, silos and silage, care of farm manures, compost- 
10 



» 



82 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 






ing, choice and methods of applying commercial fertil- 
izers for different crops and soils, and economical 
methods of improving exhausted soils. 

In every class the student is encouraged to independent thought 
on agricultural problems rather than to depend on "rules of thumb," 
so that he may be prepared to adapt his practice in after years to 
changed conditions of soil, climate, capital, market, etc. The suc- 
cessful farmer must be a thinker rather than a blind follower of in- 
flexible rules. 

The effort is made to keep before the student the difference be- 
tween the widely applicable principles on which every rational sys- 
tem of farming rests and the details that vary with changing condi- 
tions. The conditions of soil, climate, etc., prevailing in different 
parts of Alabama are kept constantly in view. 

As far as limited time allows, attention is directed to agricultural 
literature now accumulating so rapidly in this and in foreign coun- 
tries, to the end that in future years the student may know where 
and how to seek the information that he may need. 

Applicants for post-graduate work in agriculture will be as- 
signed special research work and aided in the line of investigation 
deemed best for each individual student. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Horses, Cattle, Sheep, and Swine, by Curtis; The Study of Breeds, 
by Shaw; Milk and its Products, by Wing; Dairyman's Manual, by 
Stewart; Soils and Crops of the Farm, by Morrow & Hunt; The Fer- 
tility of the Soil, by Roberts; Corn Culture, by Plumb; The Soil, by 
King; Manures and the Principles of Manuring, by Aikman; Drain- 
age for Profit and Health, by Waring; Agriculture in some of its 
Relations with Chemistry, by^torer; Manual of Cattle Feeding, by 
Armsby; Feeds and Feeding, by Henry; Stock Breeding, by Miles; 
Hand-Book of Experiment Station Work; and selected publications 
of the various divisions of the U. S. Department of Agriculture and 
of the agricultural experiment stations. 



BIOLOGY AND HORTICULTURE. 

PROFESSOR EARLE. 

The subject of biology is required of the senior class 
in the courses of chemistry and agriculture, and of phar- 
macy. It occupies five hours a week for three terms of 
the senior year, The work in this department will be 



wmnmmmimmrmmmm 




LABORATORY OF BIOLOGY. 







•c 



»• 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 



83 



largely confined to the study of the lower forms of plant 
life* and to vegetable physiology, or the study of plants 
as living beings. Under the first head special attention 
will be given to the bacteria and other d -eases produc- 
ing organisms of man and the higher annuals; and to 
the parasitic fungi that cause diseases of plants. Under 
vegetable physiology those problems that explain the 
foundation for correct agricultural practices will be 
made most prominent. This will include the germina- 
tion of seeds, the food and nutrition of plants, the circu- 
lation of the sap, the processes of reproduction, plant 
variability, etc. 

The instruction will be by text-book, supplemented by lectures 
and by practical laboratory work. 

The students will be required to make careful microscopic draw- 
ings of objects studied. They will also collect material in the fields 
and determine it so far as their instruction will admit. 

The equipment for instruction in this department comprises be- 
sides a sufficient lecture room, a students' laboratory and two small 
Sass rooms for cultural and bacteriological work. These are sup- 
S3 Z Twater, gas and all necessary appliances ■ *J*J^ 
mary and advanced work, including compound an ^Ovlg 
scopes for each student, microtomes, parage M* J^Woj 
steam and dry sterilizers, instantaneous water heaters Pasteur ni 
" emLl and common balances, set of M£-g o ° j£ 
sitic and other fungi, besides a large and well eetoetej *oc* g> 
ware staining fluids, chemical re-agents, culture : medi , etc 

In the private office of the department, which » »»•■»" 
spedal laboratory for the use of the »«"***"» JJJJJ 
good reference library and the f^^^t^L of 
ment. At present these consist «j£^SmJZ aud col- 
fungi, and of the other groups of cryptogams. ln the 

lections are accessible ^^^%SStt advanced 
other resources mentioned, a superior euu y 

biological instruction. horticulture . 

At present special horticultural instruction J. > con- 
fined to the spring term of the junior year «^£ 
of chemistry and agriculture, and to -W^J? 
and "field lectures" to the students of the same course 



84 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute: 






during the sophomore year. Instruction is given by lec- 
tures iuul text-book and by courses of reading, using the 

ft 

green house and orchards and gardens of the experi- 
ment station to give practical illustrations of the sub- 
jects taught. 

Attention is called to the various fruits and vegetables that can 
be successfully cultivated in Alabama, and methods of propagation 
cultivation and marketing are discussed. Particular attention is 
called to the diseases and insect enemies to which each of these 
crops are liable, and careful directions are given as to the best 
known means of combating them. The construction and manage- 
ment of green houses, hot beds and cold frames receives special at- 
tention, while such topics as floriculture, landscape gardening and 
forestry are discussed in a general way only. 

Special work will be arranged for any student desiring to take a 
more extended course in horticulture. 



MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS. 

COr,. B. S. PATRICK, COMMANDANT. 

Military science and tactics are required by law to be 
taught in this institution. The law is faithfully carried 
<>iit by imparting to each student, not physically inca- 
pacitated to bear arms, practical instruction in the 
school of the soldier, of the company and of the battalion 
in Close and extended order, also in guard mountings, in- 
spections, dress parades, reviews, etc. 

Under section 1225, U. S. Revised Statutes, the Col- 
lege is provided with modern cadet rifles and accoutre- 
ments. Ammunition for practice firing is used under the 
direction of an experienced officer. The exercises in tar- 
get practice begin the first day of the third term. 

The following uniform of standard cadet gray cloth 
1ms been prescribed for dress: Coat and pants as 
worn at West Point, with sack coat for fatigue, dark 
Mne cadet cap. A neat and serviceable uniform can be 
obtained here at $U to |15. This is l ess expensive than 
be usnal clothing. All students are required to wear 
this umform during the session. 






I 



■^p 



7» 




CO 

I- 
UJ 
G 
< 
O 

u. 
O 

CO 

Q. 

cr 
O 

o 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



85 



The entire body of students is divided into companies. 
The officers are selected for military efficiency, good 
conduct and scholarship. The commissioned officers 
will be selected either from the senior or junior classes, 
and promotion will depend on merit and not wholly on 
seniority. 

A band, composed of cadets, furnishes appropriate 
music at all reviews and parades, and on other special 
occasions. 

A student who has once accepted an office cannot resign it except 
for reasons entirely satisfactory to the President and Commandant. 
The resignation of his office by a minor will usually not be consid- 
ered without first placing all the circumstances of the case before 
his parent or guardian. 

Candidates for appointment or promotion may be required to 
stand an examination. Moral fitness, including demerits, will be 
considered. 

No cadet can continue an officer in the corps who during a session 
is classed in the fourth grade in two of more subjects at any term 
examination, or in the fourth grade in any subject at two term 
examinations; nor who receives during the session more than 60 

demerits. 

Examinations will be conducted by a board of officers, to be com- 
posed of the Commandant of Cadets and two commissioned officers, 
to be designated by him. The proceedings of the board are subject 
to revision and approval by the President of the College. 

Each company is officered by one captain, two first lieutenants, 
one second lieutenant, and with a proper number of non-commis- 
sioned officers. The officers and non-commissioned officers are dis- 
tinguished by appropriate insignia of rank. These appointments 
are confirmed by the President on nomination of the Commandant. 

The junior class recites once a week in the United States Infan- 
try Drill Regulations. 

The senior class recites once a week in Wagner's Elements of 
Military Science, and Manual of Guard Duty, U. S. Army. 

On the graduation of each class the names of such students as 
have shown special aptitude for military service will be reported to 
the Adjutant-General of the U. S. Army, and the names of the three 
most distinguished in military science and tactics will be inserted 
in the U. S. Army Register, and published in general orders from 
headquarters of the army. 




86 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

PHYSIOLOGY AND VETERINARY SCIENCE. 

PROFESSOR CARY. 
PHYSIOLOGY. 

The sophomore class studies human anatomy, physi- 
ology and hygiene during the entire college year. 

It is the aim of the department to give the students 
practical and real knowledge of the gross anatomy and 
functions of the various parts of the human body. Due 
attention is given, also, to the laws of health — the con- 
ditions most favorable to a continuous healthy action of 
the organs of the human body. 

Instruction is given by lectures and by text-books, 
supplemented by black-board drawings, charts, models 
of organs, a human skeleton, and by dissections of some 
of the smaller animals (dog, cat, etc.). 

Martin's Human Body is used as a text and reference 
book, and several other works on anatomy, physiology 
and hygiene may be consulted in the college library. 

VETERINARY SCIENCE AND ART. 

Students in the agricultural and chemical course of 
study, during the entire junior and senior years, devote 
to this work two hours per week in the class room and 
three hours per week at practical clinics. Instruction in 
veterinary science and art is given by lectures. 

The lectures are arranged with special reference to the 
students who are interested in horses or other domestic 
animals; also to those students who contemplate study- 
ing human or veterinary medicine. While it is not the 
aim to give a complete course in veterinary medicine, we 
attempt to present the general principles of comparative 
medicine with such special applications as are adapted 
to the conditions and wants of the students. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



87 




Special attention is given to the exterior anatomy of the horse, 
while comparative anatomy is presented mainly in connection with 
the study of the diseases of the different apparatus of the horse or 
other domestic animals. 

Lameness in the horse, minor surgery, the actions and uses of 
the most common medicines, the principles and practice of compara- 
tive medicine,* and the ways of protecting the health of domestic 
animals, are considered in as plain and practical a manner as the 
time allotted to each subject will permit. Post mortem examina- 
tions and the dissection of domestic animals are used as object les- 
sons in the study of general pathology and anatomy. 

The senior class in pharmacy devotes three hours per week, 
during the first and second terms, to the study of therapeutics; 
and four hours per week during the third term to class room and 
laboratory work in bacteriology. 

To the post-graduate student this department furnishes work in 
history, pathology, bacteriology, meat and milk inspection. This 
work gives students who contemplate studying medicine excellent 
preparatory work along that line. Such students may devote their 
entire time to work in this department with the approval of the 
faculty. 




mm 






88 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



Histology includes methods of injecting small animals, collecting, 
fixing, hardening, embedding, section cutting, mounting, staining, 
examining under the microscope, drawing and describing the differ- 
ent tissues. 

Pathology is studied in text and reference books, and morbid his- 
tology embraces naked eye and microscopic examinations of dis- 
eased tissues in the laboratory. Quite a collection of diseased* tissues 
and animal parasites are found in connection with the laboratory. 

The laboratory is well fitted for the study of bacteriology. Bac- 
teriological analyses of water, milk, sputum, pus, diseased tissues, 
and of soils can be made. All of the practical operations in the pre- 
paration of culture, media, sterilizations, inoculations of small ani- 
mals, staining, microscopical examinations may be learned. In the 
laboratory, are 3 Bausch and Lomb and 2 Winkel microscopes, each 
of whichAs supplied with oil immersion objectives, 2 oculars, Abbe 
condenser, and iris diaphragm. Sterilizers, autoclaves, incubators, and 
all the necessary apparatus required in bacteriological work are to 
be found in the laboratory. 

The department of physiology and veterinary science is now 
located by itself in a building which consists of a two-story portion, 
containing four laboratory rooms on the second floor and a lecture 
room, museum and office on the lower floor; and a one-story part, 
which contains an operating room. 

The building is supplied with water and gas, and the laboratory 
is now equipped for work. The museum contains the skeletons of 
the horse, the ox, the sheep, and the hog, and a human skeleton. 
It also contains anatomical models of the various parts and organs 
of the human body and models of many parts of the horse, the ox, 
and the other domestic animals. It also contains a collection of 
pathological and anatomical specimens, and one of animal parasites. 
The new veterinary hospital building contains five large box stalls, 
four open single stalls, an office and a feed room, on the lower floor; 
the upper floor is used as a storage room for hay, fodder, etc. The 
hospital is supplied with fresh water. 

Every Saturday during the college year, the department conducts 
a free clinic for the benefit of the students in veterinary science and 
art. Clinical cases have been various and numerous, giving the 
students opportunity to see and study many diseases and lamenesses 
and to become proficient in minor operations 








LABORATORY OF PHARMACY. 



'■A ' 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 89 

PHARMACY AND PHARMACOGNOSY. 

PROFP3SSOR MILLER. 
JUNIOR YEAR. 

Pharmacy. — Class work, three hours a week. The dif- 
ferent systems of weights and measures. Specific grav- 
ity. Pharmaceutical problems. The fundamental opera- 
tions in pharmacy. Apparatus used in pharmaceutical 
processes. Discussion of all classes of pharmaceutical 
preparations. 

Laboratory, nine hours a week. Preparation of official 
and non-official galenicals. 

Pharmacognosy. — Class work with laboratory work, 
four hours a week. All official vegetable drugs studied 
with aid of simple and compound microscope. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Pharmacy. — Class work, four hours a week. Official 
and non-official pharmaceutical chemicals, inorganic 
and organic, including the more important newer reme- 
dies. The prescription. Incompatibilities. Doses. 

Laboratory, nine hours a week. Preparation of offi- 
cial and non-official pharmaceutical chemicals, inorganic 
and organic. Pharmaceutical testing by pharmacopoeial 
methods. Drug assaying, special attention given to com- 
pounding of prescriptions. 

Pharmacognosy.— CM** work with laboratory work, 
four hours a week. Study of important non-officiaJ 
vegetable drugs; of drugs of animal origin; of adulter- 
ants and worthless drugs. Practical exercises in identi- 
fication of pharmaceutical preparations and chemicals. 

The practical work in pharmacy includes the manufacture of not 
less than two hundred pharmaceutical preparations and the com- 
pounding of not less than fifty prescriptions. 

The work in pharmacognosy includes the study of more than three 
hundred drugs, each of which the student is required to recognize 
by its physical and chemical properties, giving Latin name, common 
name, origin, habitat, constituents, medicinal action and dose, 

U 




90 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

GYMNASIUM AND ATHLETIC FIELD. 

The gymnasium is situated at the west end of the ath- 
letic and drill grounds, and contains one room, 80x40 
feet, with strong beams above for fastening the usual fix- 
tures. 

It is equipped with Spalding's gymnasium apparatus 
and is open to all students at stated hours, under the 
care of an officer. 

The athletic field has a quarter-mile cinder track and 
ample space for football, baseball, and general athletics. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The government of the College is administered by the President 
and Faculty, in accordance with the code of laws and regulations 
enacted by the Trustees. 

Attention to study and punctuality in attendance on recitations 
and all other duties, are required of every student. Students are 
prohibited from having in their possession arms or weapons not 
issued for the performance of military duty, and also from using, 
or causing to be brought into the college limits, intoxicating 
liquors. 

Students are not permitted to participate in any public entertain- 
ment, or game, without previously obtaining the consent of the 
Faculty. 

No cadet will be permitted, without the approval of his parent or 
guardian, to take part in a public game of foot-ball; nor will per- 
mission be given for any athletic game, to a student deficient in his 
studies. 

MILITARY DRILL. 

There are three regular military drills each week, and all under- 
graduate students, not physically incapacitated to bear arms, are 
required to engage in these exercises; privates of the senior class 
are exempt. 

The drills are short, and the duty involves no hardships. The 
military drill is a health-giving exercise, and its good effects in the 
development of the physique and improvement of the carriage of the 
cadet are manifest. 



T 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



RELIGIOUS SERVICES. 



91 



Religious services are held every morning in the chapel. 

All students are required to attend these exercises, and also to at- 
tend the church of their choice at least once on Sunday. 

Opportunities are also offered for attending Bible classes every 
Sunday. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

This Association is regularly organized and has a well furnished 
room on the first floor of the main building set apart for its ex- 
clusive use. Through its weekly meetings it exerts a wholesome 
Christian influence among the students. 

Students are advised to unite with the Association when they 
enter the Institute. 

The ladies of the different churches in Auburn have recently 
formed an auxiliary association to the Y. M. C. A. of this Institute. 
Assisted by members of the Faculty, they will hold monthly a joint 
service of praise in the College chapel and will provide lecturers 
for the occasion. 

They have also undertaken to build a special hall for the use of 
the Association, and will solicit subscriptions for that purpose. 
The following are the officers: 

M. A. Beeson, President. 

H. Y. Hall, Vice-President. 

W. S. Rutledge, Treasurer. 

W. F. Osburn, Corresponding Secretary. 

J. R. Rxjtland, Recording Secretary. 

A. F. Jackson, Librarian. 

LOCATION. 

The Institute is situated in the town of Auburn, fifty-nine miles 
east of Montgomery, on the line of the Western Railroad. 

The region is high and healthful, noted for its general good 
health and freedom from malaria, having an elevation of eight hun- 
dred and twenty-six feet above tide water. By statute of the State, 
the sale of spirituous liquors and keeping saloons of any kind are 
forbidden. 

BOARDING. 

The Institute has no barracks or dormitories, and the students 
board with families in the town of Auburn, and thus enjoy all the 
protecting and beneficial influence of the family circle. 



( 



92 



• 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

t 

REGULATIONS. 






(1) Each student upon entering is required to sign his name in 
the matriculation book, and pledge himself to obey the rules- and 
regulations of the College. 

(2) Every absence from recitation or examination is graded 
zero. 

(3) When the term grade of a cadet is lowered by reason of ab- 
sence for which a satisfactory excuse can be rendered, a special 
term re-examination may be subsequently granted, and the grade 
made on the special re-examination alone is substituted for that 
previously received. 

(4) Only sickness, as reported by the Surgeon, or being absent 
by reason of family sickness, will constitute a satisfactory excuse 
for granting a re-examination. 

When a cadet is called away from College by his parents his 
zeros for absences are not removed. 

(5) The term grade of a student is the average of his daily ses- 
sional and term examination marks, found by giving due weight to 
the term examination. 

(6) Privates of the senior class in full standing who are candi- 
dates for graduation may be excused by the President from all 
military drills, and also students over twenty-one years of age at the 
time of entering College that are permitted to devote their time to 
one special study, as chemistry, agriculture or pharmacy, provided 
the time devoted to drill is spent by them in laboratory work. 

DISTINCTIONS. 

Distinctions are awarded in the different subjects of each class to 
those students whose grade for the entire year is above ninety per 
cent. 

Certificates of distinction are awarded in public on commence- 
ment day to those who obtain an average of 90 per cent, in all the 
prescribed studies of a regular class; and also to those who obtain 
three distinctions in the freshman class, four in the sophomore 
class, five in the junior class, and six in the senior class, provided 
they have satisfactorily passed all the regular examinations of that 
session, and have not received forty demerits during the year. 

A distinction is not given in the senior class if the average grade 
in any one subject is less than 75 per cent. 

RECORDS AND CIRCULARS. 

th^oflf reC ° r , d ? ° f thG Vari ° US exercises of the daBBes are kept by 
the officers of instruction. 

At the close of each term and at regular intervening intervals re- 
or Sardlm *"** ^ ^ "^ StUdent ' are sent to the parent 






*y 



\ 



WW«PWMMWWW—W r 



■*m mQ*mimmi! >im<* mm mm 




%.s 



* 



GENERAL LIBRARY. 



■ - - t -— "" 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

EXAMINATIONS. 



93 



Written examinations on the studies of the month are held by 
each professor during the months of October, February, and 
April. Each examination occupies one hour. 

At the end of each term written examinations, or written and 
oral, are held on the studies passed over during that term. 

Special examinations are held only by order of the Faculty, and 
in no case will private examinations be permitted. 

Students falling below the minimum grade at the final examina- 
tions, can be promoted to full standing in the next higher class only 
on satisfactory examinations at the opening of the next session. 

It is required that every student who enters the College shall re- 
main through the examinations at the end of the term. Leaves of 
absence and honorable discharges will, therefore, not be granted 
within three weeks of the examination, except in extreme cases. . 

LIBRARY. 

The library occupies an elegant, well-lighted room in the main 
building, and also two smaller adjacent rooms. It contains over 
14,000 bound volumes, including valuable reference and scientific 
books, with select editions of standard authors, and others suitable 
for students, carefully and recently selected. It is kept open eight 
hours daily for the use of students as a reading room, and is thus 
made an important educational feature. 

MUSEUM. 

The museum occupies a large room in the third story. It is pro- 
vided with suitable cases and is equipped with valuable specimens 
and models of an instructive character. It is under the charge of 
Professor P. H. Mell, to whom specimens as contributions may be 
sent. 

BOARDING HOUSES. 

For each house an inspector is appointed, whose duty it is to re- 
port those who, without permission, leave their rooms after "call 
to quarters," or are guilty of any violation of order. The report of 
the inspector is made to the Commandant on alternate days of the 

week. 

Students, after selecting their boarding-houses, are not per- 
mitted to make changes without obtaining permission from the 
president, and this permission is given only at the close of a term, 
except for special reasons. 

Permission to board and lodge at separate houses will be granted 
only to seniors, to cadets twenty-one years of age and to those who 
are on the "honor roll," except on special conditions. 
12 












94 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

EXPENSES. 

There is no charge for tuition for a resident of Ala- 
bama. 

Incidental fee, per half session $2 50 

Library fee, per half session 2. 00 

Surgeon's fee, per half session # 2 50 

$6 00 
These fees are payable, $6.00 on matriculation and 
$6.00 on February 1st. By order of the Trustees no fees 
can be remitted. 

For students entering after January 1st, the fees for a 
half session only are required. 

For a non-resident of the State there is a charge for 
tuition of $20.00 per session, payable $10.00 on matricu- 
lation and $10.00 on February 1st, in addition to the 
semi-annual fee of $6.00 payable by all students. 

Board, including lodging, fuel and lights is furnished 
at $12.50 to $15.00 per month. 

The necessary expenses for a session, not including 
uniforms or books, are for a resident of Alabama, as fol- 
lows : , 7 

p° U T i *? b . $12.00 *12.00 

Board, lodging, fuel arid lights .... 108.00 135.00 

Washin S 9.00 9.00 

T0tal $129.00 $156.00 

By special arrangement with the College authorities 
Mrs^M L. Mitchell, Mrs. A. Debardeleben, and Mrs. S. 
M Anderson will accommodate students with board, 
lodging, fuel, &c, for $9.50 per month. 

By boarding at one of these houses the necessary ex- 
penses may be reduced to $106.50 per session. ' This es- 
timate does notWlude the cost of the uniform, about 






Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 95 

$14.00, or of books, say from $5.00 to $15.00, or the 

laboratory fees in the higher classes, $5.00 or $10.00. I 

LABORATORY FEES. I 

For each student in the junior or senior laboratory in I 

chemistry, or in electrical and mechanical engineering, 1 

a fee of $5.00 per session is required. This fee is pay- I 
able on admission to the laboratory, and is not remitted. 

NON-RESIDENT STUDENTS. 

fl 

Tuition for students not residents of Alabama is $20.00 per ses- 
sion, unless remitted by the Trustees to worthy students upon the 
recommendation of the Faculty. 

The remission of this tuition fee to non-resident students will be 
granted in the form of a free scholarship for the succeeding year, 
to those who obtain a distinction the preceding year, or who, by 
reason of merit, are deemed worthy. 

This tuition for non-residents is remitted to sons of ministers of 
the gospel. 

HONOR SCHOLARSHIPS. I 

The following non-resident students were granted, each, by reason 
of special merit in conduct and scholarship during the session '98-99, 1 

an honor scholarship, which exempted from tuition fees: 
W. W. Askew Georgia. J 

E. Bukofzer Tennessee. 

J.D.Elliott ..Wyoming. 

F. C. Greene Georgia. 

R. B. Hall .Georgia. 

A. F. Jackson. . Georgia. 

M. Ketchum • • -Florida. 

H. M. Kilpatrick Georgia. 

K. E. Lindrose ...Mississippi. 

C.W.Nixon • Tennessee. 

H. B.Park... Georgia. 

H. P. Powell .....Georgia. 

H. E. Werner • •-•••' -. Texas - 

W.D.Willis Florida - 

J. E. D. Yonge Florida - 

UNIFORM. 

A uniform of cadet gray cloth is prescribed, which all under- 
graduate students are required to wear during the session. The uni- 
forms are made, by a contractor, of excellent cloth manufactured at 



I 



i 



A 





96 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 






i 



I 



the Charlottesville mill. This suit, including cap, costs at present 
about $14.00. It is neat and serviceable, and less expensive than 
ordinary clothing. 

CONTINGENT FEE. 

A contingent fee of five dollars is required to be deposited by each 
student on matriculation, to cover any special or general damage to 
college property for which he may be liable. General damages are 
assessed on the body of students. 

At the close of the session the whole of the contingent fee, or the 
unexpended balance, is refunded to the student. 

AMOUNT OF DEPOSIT. 
Fees to be paid on entrance: 

Incidental fee * « rA 

T ., r « 50 

£ lbrary 100 

:S2T* •';:■; 2 50 

Contingent fee , .. 

Uniform :* *J 

14 00 

Tuition, non-resident °° 

135 00 

enoSTn"! 6 ab f ° V V he StUd6nt Sh0Uld deposit with th « Treasurer 

n^to a ? Loo' K *' °" m ° nth ' S ^ lncWentaIs ' <"• 
wifh th. t . DCe ' a reSldent of Alabama should deposit 

with the Treasurer ?50.00, a non-resident, $60.00. 

FUNDS OF STUDENTS. 

of !he e CoIl e r a n U f ^ ^ adVlS6d t0 deposit with th ° Treasurer 

Sr chafes of 2 < ** *** S ° nS ' ° r Wards ' whether for «** 

he duty Tf tl T f S ° r b ° ard> ° r for any other ™se. It is 

and to nav S - ' ° **» "^ *" fUndS * laced ln "« * aads . 

^™zi:zz*z:Lr the students ' <— board - 

the^ollrbytr^^f 6d ' Ch6CkS m drawn oa tne Treasu ™ oi 
are pa £S 2? « t0 Pay Ws nec ^ary expenses. These checks 

for ne essa^ ^™ * aPPr ° Ved - The a M>™ al is *™ oniy 

reau^rr^iTbi'th: js in the cataiogue - «*- **«*«» 

delt'^n^rtheT ? 6 heW responsi "to for the expenses of a stu- 

oent\SrpelTted r :o d h e a P ; S,t a ed ^ ^ T ~"- N ° StU - 
as It brin gS onl/trou ^ 'SggTJgg* * "^ ""^ 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



97 



THESIS. 

Each applicant for a'degree is required to write and submit to the 
Faculty a thesis, or oration and read and deliver the same at com- • 
mencement if equired by the Faculty 

There may be presented, with the approval of the professor in 
charge, a carefully written report of special work d *ne in a labora- 
tory showing independent investigation and discussion of some 
subject. 

It must be given to the Professor of English by the first of April. 

The subject must be submitted for approval by January 1st. 

LITERAHY SOCIETIES. 

There are two literary societies connected with the 
College — the Wirt and the Websterian. Each has a, 
hall in the main building. 

These societies hold celebrations on the evenings of , 
Thanksgiving Day and 22nd of February. They elect 
annually, with the approval of the Faculty, an orator to 
represent them at the close of the year. 

To encourage the literary societies the Trustees have 
directed that a medal be awarded on commencement 
day to the member of each society who is both efficient, 
and regular in attendance, and who is the best debater. 
The method of selection to be determined by the Faculty. 

EXERCISES IN ELOCUTION. 

On every Saturday morning, immediately after chapel services, 
oratorical exercises in declamation and in original orations are con- 
ducted by the Professor of English, in the presence of the Faculty 

and students. 

Theirs* and second term* the students of the junior and sophomore 
classes are exercised in original orations and declamation 

The second and third terms the members of the senior class read 
essays and deliver original orations. 

SOCIETY OF THE ALUMNI. 

In 1885, the Alumni Society established "The Alumni 
Scholarship," which makes an annual loan of one hun- , 
dred and seventy dollars to a beneficiary elected by thee 
society. Eight young men have been thus enabled to 



M 




98 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

go through college. This scholarship is supported by 
annual contributions from the Alumni and other friends 
of the institution. 

The beneficiary selected is admitted without charge 
for tuition or college fees of any character. 

►Subscriptions should be sent to B. H. Crenshaw 
Treasurer, Auburn, Ala. 

The annual alumni oration is delivered by a member 
of the society, in Langdon Hall, on Alumni Day, Tues- 
day of commencement week. 
The following are officers of the society : 

C. L. Hare President. 

it. ap C. Jones. vice President. 

("has. h - Ross Permanent Secretary. 

II. H. Kyser Assistant Secretary. 

B H. Crenshaw Treasurer. 

George H. Price, M. D. . . . .• .Orator, 1900. 

SURGEON. 

The Surgeon is required to be present at the College 
daily, to visit at their quarters the cadets that are re- 
ported sick, and to give all requisite medical attention 
without other charge than the regular surgeon's fee, paid 
on entering college. 

ACADEMIC YEAR. 

The academic year for 1900-1901 commences on 
Wednesday, 12th September, 1900 (second Wednesday 
after the first Monday), and ends on Wednesday, 12th 
June, 1901 (second Wednesday after first Monday), 
which is commencement day. 

It is divided into three terms. The first term extends 

from the opening of the session to the 21st of December; 

he second term begins January 2nd, and ends March 

18th ; the third term continues to the close of the session. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



99 



AN ACT OF THE LEGISLATURE. 

To change the name of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of 

Alabama. 

Whereas, the Agricultural and Mechanical College at Aaburn 
having by means of the appropriations made by the State legisla- 
ture, and by those made and continued in recent years by the acts 
of Congress, developed, as originally designed, into an institution 
where are taught not only the branches that relate to agriculture 
and the mechanic arts, but also the sciences and arts in general 
that relate to the industrial development of modern civilization, 
therefore : 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the General Assembly of Alabama, 
That said institution shall hereafter be known and designated as 
The Alabama Polytechnic Institute, it being provided that said In- 
stitute shall continue to perform the functions of the State college 
for the benefit of agriculture and the mechanic arts, in accordance 
with the provisions of the Acts of Congress of July 2, 1862, grant- 
ing lands to the several States and territories for collegiate pur- 
poses. 

Approved January 27, 1899. 

(Official) . Robt. P. McDavtd, 

Secretary of State. 
DONATIONS TO THE LIBRARY. 

United States Government— Public Documents, 148 volumes. 

Dr. P. C. Candidus, Mobile, Ala.— Works on Botany, Pharmacy, 
and Chemistry, 110 volumes. 

American Union League Society— Facing the Twentieth Century, 

by James M. King, 1 volume. 

T. A. Coghlan, Sydney, N. S. W — Wealth and Progress of New 
South Wales, 1 volume. 

A. C. Vandiver— Glomerata, volume 2. 

L. B. Rainey— Glomerata, volume 3. 

Dr. J. L. M. Curry— Peabody Educational Fund, 2 volumes. 

DONATIONS TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL 

ENGINEERING. 

General Electric Co., 1 constant potential enclosed arc lamp, 60 
incandescent lamp manuals. 
The Adams Bagnall Co., 1 constant potential enclosed arc lamp. 
The Roebling Co., samples of insulated wire for testing. 
American Wire Co., samples of insulated wire for testing. 
The Okonite Co., samples of insulated wire for testing. 
Electric Appliance Co., samples of insulated wire for testing. 
The Westinghouse Electee * Mf$. Co., 50 street railway histories, 




100 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

DONATIONS TO AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT. 
German Kali Works, New York, 2 tons kainit, Y 2 ton muriate of 

P °T taS B Baker Mfg. Co., Racine, Wis., 1 sheep collar. 
Dr J A Myers New York, 3 sacks nitrate of soda. 
S S Dept of igriculture, assortment of field seeds. 
DONATIONS TO THE MUSEUM. 

Fossils and bird eggs from Miss Bell. 

Granite from Greenland and bird's skin, from Dr. Remus Persons. 

Cast of trilobite from Prof. 0. D. Smith. 

Indian arrow head from Miss Grout. 

Indian Lrow head and shells from C. H. Billingsley. 

Alabama fossils from C. H. Billingsley. 

Conglomerate from F. Ashcraft. 

Indian arrow heads from Dr. McElhany. 

Alabama fossils from Miss Cozart. 

Relics from an Indian mound from H. P. Powell. 

Columbian silver half dollar from E. A. Miller. 

Kauma gum from Samoan Islands from S. Stollenwerk. 

Mica and petrifications from C. L. Harold. 

Petrifications from E. H. Foy. 

Quartz crystals from W. D. McCreary. 

Quartz crystal from M. H. Kahn. 

Indian arrow heads and pottery from E. M. Boyd. 

Fossil plant from F. J. Rigney. 

Fossils from W. B. Patterson. 






T 



ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS. 

The following examinations are given as models of entrance ex- 
aminations, and will suggest to teachers and students the nature 
and scope of the work required for admission to the freshman class. 

EXAMINATION IN ENGLISH. 

I. GRAMMAR. 

I. Name the parts of speech. Give examples of each. 

II. Name and decline the personal pronouns. 

III. Compare the following: good, ill, bad, happy, perfect 

IV. What is an irregular verb? A regular verb? An intransitive 

verb? A transitive verb? An impersonal verb? Give example 
of each. 

V. Give the principal parts of the following verbs: to be,Jo see, 

to dig, to lie (to recline) ,to lay, to set, to sit, to write, to love, 

to crow. 

VI. Give in full the present and past tenses, Indicative and Sub- 

junctive Modes, of (1) to be, (2) to love. 

VII. How is the Passive voice formed? Give Passive voice, third 
person, singular number, Indicative and Subjunctive of to ask. 

VIII. Form the possessive singular and plural of pony, valley, 
mouse, ox, princess, it, man. Form plural of following words: 
Radius, phenomenon, cupful, Mr., Mrs., talisman, genius, 
genus, attorney, zero, hero, brother-in-law. 

IX. Parse in full the following Sentence: He that observeth the 

' wind shall not sow. 

X. Correct any errors in the following sentences: 

1. Dot your its and cross your Pi. 

2. Dr. Arnold of Rugby kept a famous boy's school. 

3. Can I speak to my desk-mate? 

4. I dont know nothing about your affairs. 

5. Between you and I, I don't believe it. 

6. Have you seen the book of my friend Story? 

7. Has everybody performed their examples? 

8. The oldest daughter has married a banker whom they say 

is very wealthy. 

9. I intended to have written. 

10. We are acquainted neither with the doctor or with his 

family. 

11. I will be drowned; nobody shall help me. 
12l We shall not go without it stops raining. 









i 



102 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

ii. literature and composition. 
Ivanhoe. 






i Who are the main characters in Ivanhoet What is the date of 
the events of the story? Who was King of England at that 

time? , M ,_. . 

II Describe the following: (1) Cedric and his home. (2) Man- 

ners and Customs of the Saxons. (3) Relations of the Saxons 
to the Normans. 

III Tell something about Isaac of York, Rebecca, Rowena. 

IV. Describe the tournament of Ashby. 

V. Who was Robin Hood? 

VI. Describe the assault on the castle of Front de Bceuf . 

VII. Give the conclusion of the story. 

VIII. Write a letter giving account of your journey from home tc 
Auburn. Pay especial attention to form, spelling, and punc- 
tuation. 

Note.— The subject of Examination for 1900, will be taken from 
the list of books in Literature required for admission. [See p. 39.] 

EXAMINATION IN MATHEMATICS. 



I. ARITHMETIC. 



s 



I Write ten million, four thousand, and fifty: one thousand and 
two, ten millionths. 

II. Find least common multiple of 60, 15, 24 and 25. 

III. Reduce if x f x 7j— j of f x 5. 

IV. If 15.25 lbs. of meat cost $.68%, how many lbs. of meat can be 

bought for a bale of cotton weighing 520 lbs. sold for 1% cents 
a pound? 

V. A man sold a horse for $125 00 and gained 12%%, how much did 

the horse cost ? 

April 23rd, 1898 

VI. One day after date I promise to pay John Doe, or order, one 
hundred and twenty-five ■&$ dollars, value received. Richard 
Roe. 

Endorsements : 

Dec. 25th, 1898— $25.00. 
April 1st, 1899— $50.00. 
How much is due Sept. 15th, 1900. Rate of interest %%t 



*■■ 



Alabama polytechnic Institute. 



103 



II. ALGEBRA. 



I. (a.) Simplify by removing parentheses and combining terms: 

2 x-( y -!- [ 4 x-( y-2 x )-3 x] ). 

(b.) Divide x*m -|- x 2 ™ -|- 1 by x 2n * -|- x°» -|-l. 

II. Factor (a.) 4 x*— 9 y 2 ; (b.) x 2 -x-12; (c.)x 2 -a 2 -|- 2 ab-b 2 ; 

(d.) im-n-l-2, 

III. Simplify (a) _± 



•t 



x 2 — 5x-|-6 
(b.) a 2 -b 2 



a" 



x-4 
x 2 —4x-|-3 

ab— b 2 
X 



x-3 

x 2 — 3x-|- 2 

(a— b) 2 



3 a b -|- 2 b 2 X a 2 -|- a b ' a 2 -a b 



™ t?a i * . , ^ llx-l-2 , x , ' 3 x-2 2— 7x 
IV. Find value of x in (a) — J — -J- _. -|- 4 = — - — __ — — 

Verify. 



« 



<t << a 



(b) 



5 a 



2bi 



a __ b - a .|_b a 2 -b 2 - Verify, 

V. Mnltiplyx«— x^y>^-|-y%byx^-|-y^. 

VI. Expand (x 2 — x" 2 ) 2 and write the result with positive exponents. 

VII. Simplify (a.) ^6U+ /IS-f5S; (b.) If a=8, b=4, c=2 find 

numerical value of 2 a& b-§ c 2 ; (c.) Extract square root 

VIII. If the floor of a hall had been 2 feet longer, and 4 feet wider, 
it would have contained 528 square feet more; but if the length 
and width had been 2 feet less the floor would contain 316 
square feet less. How many square feet in the floor? 

in. geometey.— First Two Books. 

I. If two parallel straight lines are cut by a third straight line, 

the alternate interior angles are equal. 

II. The sum of the three angles of a triangle are equal to two right 

angles. 

III. The median of a trapezoid is parallel to the bases and is equal 

to one half their sum. 

IV. A radius perpendicular to a chord bisects it and the arc sub- 

tended by it 

V In the same circle, or equal circles, two angles at the centre 

have the same ratio as their intercepted arcs. 

VI The radius of the circle inscribed in an equilateral triangle is 
' equal to one third of the altitude of the triangle. 






104 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



EXAMINATION IN UNITED STATES HISTORY. 

1 Give a summary of the Navigation Acts. 

2.' Make a list of the causes of the Revolutionary War, and explain 

each briefly. 
3 Why did the colonists object to the Stamp Act? 

4. Point out the defects of the Articles of Confederation and ex- 

plain how each of these was remedied in the Constitution. 

5. Name three compromises in the Constitution and explain between 

what parties each was made. 

6. Give an account of the Hartford Convention. 

7. What was the purpose of the Embargo Act? 

8. Explain three of the following: 

(1) Ordinance of 1787; (2) Missouri Compromise; (3) Mon- 
roe Doctrine; (4) Omnibus Bill. 

9. What was meant by Nullification and on what ground did South 

Carolina base its right to nullify the tariff? 

10. Make a list of the causes of the Civil War and explain each. 

EXAMINATION IN LATIN. 

Required of students who propose to continue that study in the 
freshman class (not required for admission to college). 
I. (1) Translate Caesar, Bk. II, Chapter 13. 

[Note: — Instead of Caesar a selection from.Nepos, or other 
equivalent may be substituted.] 

(2) Give the principal parts of ihe first six verbs in the above 
Latin. 

(3) Tell what verbs in the above are in the Subjunctive and 
explain their use. 

(4) Do the same for all verbs in the Infinitive. 

11. (1) How do you express in Latin, (a) the Agent, (b) Manner, 

(c) Place Where, (d) Duration of Time? 
(2) Give an example in English of (a) Hortatory Subjunctive, 
(b) Clause of Purpose, (c) Indirect Question. 
III. Write in Latin: 

(1) Caesar comes (venire) to Italy. 

(2) The soldiers (miles) asked (rogare) aid (auxilium). 

(3) We shall come to Italy from Greece (Graecia). 






INDEX. 



Page. 

Academio Year 98 

Admission to College 34-39 

Admission to Higher Classes 39, 40 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 5 

Agriculture 8, 45, 50, 80-82 

Alumni..... 97, 98 

Astronomy 55 

Athletics 90 

Auburn. 91 

Auxiliary Schools 36 > 37 

Band 38 

Biology 12,82,83 

Boarding 91 ' 93 

Botany 16.57,58 

Buildings of the College ;• 14 

Cadet Band 

Cadet Officers 30,31,85 

Calendar, 1900-1901, second 

page of cover. 
Certificate Schools 36 - 37 

10 44, 64-66 
Chemistry 1U ' **« 

Civil Engineering 12,46,59,60 

Classification of Students by 

ox 

residence 

Classification of Students by . 

studies ' 

College buildings...... — 

College established ^ 

College, name of 

College, object of 

Courses obstruction •»* 

.. 62,63,97 

Declamation ^g 

Degrees 



Page. 

Departments of Instruction 52-86 

Discipline 90 

Distinctions 92 

Distinguisbed Students 15-18, 87 

Donations 99, 100 

Drawing .12, 59, 60, 77 

Drill 9° 

Electrical Engineering .10, 11, 

47, 70-73 

Elocution 62, 63, 97 

English • 61, 62, 63 

Examinations, entrance 34-38 

Examinations, monthly and term 93 
Examinations, specimen 101-104 

Expenses - 94 » 95 » 96 

Experiment Station 5 

Faculty and Officers ; 3 « * 

Farm "" 

Fees, Alabama Students 94-96 

Fees, Non-residents 94 " 96 

Fees, Contingent ' ■ 

Fees, Laboratory 

69 
French 

Freshman Class, roll of 24-77 

48 
General Course 

57, 58 

Geology 

69 
German 

Graduate Courses, see each de- 

partment, also •»•• **• 

Graduate Students, roll of I 9 

Graduates, 1899, roll of 15. * 5 

90 
Gymnasium 



207883 



106 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 






Paojb, 

History 68, G7 > r,s 

Honor Certificate! 17, 1S 

Honor (Jraduates I* 

Honor Scholarships 98 

Honor Students 15, 16 

Horticulture 8, 88« s ^ 

Irregular Students 89 

Irregular Student*, roll of 27-29 

Junior Class, roll of 21, 22 

Laboratories: 

Agriculture £ Horticulture S 

Biology 12, 83 

Botany.... ; 11,57 

Chemistry. 10, 65, <5»> 

Drawing 12, (JO, 77 

Electrical Engineering 10, 11, 73 

Mechanic Arts 8, 9, 74-7<> 

Mechanical Engineer' g, 12, 18, 74-80 

Mineralogy 11 

Pharmacy 18, 89 

Physics 11, 54, 55 

Physiology 18,86 

Veterinary Science 18, 87, 88 

Laboratory Fees 95 

Latin 6K, 69 

Library 98 

Literary Societies 97 

Mathematics 55-57 

Mechanic ArtH 8, 9, 50, 74-70 

Mechanical Drawing 77 

Mechanical Engineering. 12. 

18, 47, 74-80 

Medical Attendance 98 

Mental Science (;;.} 

Military Drill q 

Military Organization ;, 30, 33 

Military Science & Tactics 14^ $4 

Military Science A Tactics, dis- 

tinguinhed students in 33, #5 

Modern Languages gg 

Museum <j^ 



Page 

• 

Non-resident Students 94-95 

0bject3 of the College 7 

Officers, Cadet 32, 33 

Officers, College 3, 4 

Officers o! Experiment Station... 5 

Orations 62, 63 

Pharmacy 18, 49, 51, 89 

Philosophy 63 

Physics 11, 55, 66 

Physiology 12, 86-88 

Political Economy 63 

Political Science 66-68 

Records 92 

Regulations 92 

Religious Services 91 

Reports . 92 

Requirements for Admission.... 34-39 

Schedule of Exeroises 52-53 

Senior Class, roll of ^ 19-21 

Societies, Literary ... 91 

Society of the Alumni 91. 92 

Sophomore Class, roll of 23, 24 

Special and Irregular Students, 
roll of 27-29 

special and Irregular Students, 

regulations 39 

Students, register of.... 15-30 

Sub-Freshman Class, roll of.... 29, 30 

Surgeon 98 

Surveying 12 

Text-Books, see each department. 

Theme-writing 62, 63 

Theses #># 97 

Trustee* o 

• — 

Under-Graduate Students 19-30 

Uniforms 84-95 

Veterinary Science 86-88 

Woodwork 74, 75 

Women admitted to College 37, 38 

Young Men's Christian Associ- 
ation 9i 



C 



: Qatf/orJ 



PAMPHLET BINDER 

— — Syracuse, N. Y. 
Stockton, Calif. 





Catalogue of the Alabama 
Polytechnic Institute 



1900 



OCLC: 36819652 
Entered: 19970429 



Type: 
BLvl: 
S/L: 
Desc: 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 



a 
s 

a 
040 
007 
043 
090 
090 
049 
110 
245 
246 
246 
246 
260 
300 
310 
362 
500 





Rec i 


stat: 


n 






^1 


Replaced: 


19970429 


Used: 19970429 


I 


Srce: 


d 


GPub: 


s 


Ctrl: Lang: eng 


a 


Conf : 





Freq: 


a 


MRec: Ctry: alu 




EntW: 




Regl: 


r 


ISSN: Alph: a 


c 


Cont: 




DtSt: 


d 


Dates: 1900,1940 1 



f *f u *g b *h a *i u *j p J 



2 

10 

10 

10 

10 



ELvl: 

Form: 

Orig: 

SrTp: 

AAA *c AAA 1 

h *b c *d b *e 

n-us-al H 

LD271 *b .A76 I 

*b I 

AAAA f 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute, f 

Catalogue of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute *h [microform] I 

Catalog of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute 1 

Catalogue of Alabama Polytechnic Institute H 

Catalog of Alabama Polytechnic Institute fl 

Auburn, Ala. : *b [The Institute], *c 1900- 1 

41 v. : *b ill. ; *c 23 cm. I 

Annual 5 

1900-1939-40. I 

Some years issued as part of the Bulletin of the Alabama 



Polytechnic Institute. 5 



Title varies slightly, f 

Microfilm. *m 1900-1940. *b Mobile, Ala. *c Document Technology, 
microfilm reels : negative ; 35 mm. f 
d *b 1900 *c 1940 *d alu *e u *f u *g a 5 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute *x Curricula *x Periodicals. 5 
Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. *t Catalogue of 
the Alabama Polytechnic Institute i 

22 785 00 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. *t Alabama Polytechnic Institute 1 

23 830 Bulletin of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute 5 

24 830 USAIN State and Local Literature preservation Project 5 



17 500 

18 533 
*d 1997. *c 

19 539 

20 610 20 

21 780 00 




•EAIiA FOLl'TECHBIC INSTITUTE 



>jrx 



TALOGU 
'01 



TT~» 



! - r: 



/> 



— 



AUBURN UNIVERSITY 
LIBKAKY 




- 

j/OJ 









.•'-"^ '; . ■>C:-ia.H : " .■■;--'.:''-^ ■.?'." ■ ! ":'i ' -)''i' '''■"'■ e' r '-;.^V : . '..'-'■'■; 



I 











CAT.2- 



1 ~IWMJ, » 



1 















AUBURN UNIV 
LIBRAF 





m 

-D271 

.A76 

19OO/0 

".2 

| 












CALENDAR, J90J-J902. 



SeS8l0n Begrd8 Wednesday, Sept. 11, 1901. 

Examination for admission Wednesday, Sept. 11, 1901 

First term begins .Wednesday, Sept. 11, 1901. 

Literary Society Celebration-Thanksgiving Day Nov. 28, 1901. 

First term ends ™ -, „ 

• -Friday, Dec. 20, 1901. 

Second term begta Thursday, Jan. 2, 1903. 

Literary Society Celebration. Saturday, Feb. 22, 1902. 

Senior class exercises Saturday, Feb. 22, 1902. 

Second term ends o 1 j 

us • Saturday, March 15, 1992. 

Third term begins... -»r j ,. , - 

" •■■■■■ Monday, March 17, 1902. 

Senior Thesis Reported Thursday, May 1, 1902. 

Sophomore class exercises Thursday , Ma , lm 

Field day ~, 

r. Thursday, May 1,1902. 

Final examinations begin FridaVi May 30> 190 , 

Commencement sermon Sundav> June 8> 1903 

Annual meeting of Trustees. . Monday) June 8> 1903 . 

Military exercises, 4 p. m MondaV) June 9> 19Q3 

Junior class celebration, 8 p. m Monday, June 9, 1902. 

Alumni dav m j T 

J Tuesday, June 10, 1902. 

Military exercises, 5 p. m Tuesday, June 10, 1902. 

Address before Literary Societies, 8 p. m. . .Tuesday, June 10, 1902. 
Commencement day Wednesday, June 11, 1902. 



I 



E. 



«»i 



m 






c 



I 






I 



■HKHMW 



7 



Polytechnic Institute. . 



1 







CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



i 



<v <v 



e> 



rati 



■\A 




r 



t 



<y 



IV 




C<?5 



4 




HMltlK 



STATE COLLEGE 



FOS 7KZ 



BENEFIT OF AGRICULTURE AND THE MECHANIC ARTS. 



AUBURN, ALABAMA 



1901 



MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA 
THE BROWN PRINTING COMPANY PRINTERS AND BINDERS 

1901 



- ft ■III 



TRUSTEES. 



His Excellency, Wm. J. SAMFORD, President Ex-Ofjlcio. 

JNO. W. ABERCROMBIE, Superintendent of Education .. Ex-Ofjtcio, 

ITERM EXPIRES, 1907. 

Jonathan Haralson Selma, Ala. 

Thomas Williams, Wetumpka, Ala. 

J. A. Bilbro, Gadsden, Ala. 

TERM EXPIRES, 1905. 

J. ft, Carmichael, . . Ozark, Ala. 

W. K. Terry, ,,, .Birmingham, Ala. 

T. H. Frazer, Mobile, Ala. 

I. F. Purser Opelika, Ala. 

TERM EXPIRES, 1903. 

R. F. Ligon, Jr Montgomery, Ala. 

Tancred Betts, Huntsville, Ala. 

W. C. Whitaker, , Tuscaloosa, Ala. 



E. T. Glenn, Treasurer. J. H. Drake, M. D., Surgeon. 

R. W. Burton, Secretary. 



\qcolol 

barksdale FACUL TY AND OFFICERS. 

ftt26H 

Wm. LeROY BROUN, M. A., LL. D., 
President. 
OTIS DAVID SMITH, M. A., LL. D., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

PATRICK HUGHES MELL, M. E., Ph. D., 
Professor of Botany and Geology. 

JAMES HENRY LANE, C. E., M. A., Ph. D., LL. D., 
Professor of Civil Engineering and Drawing. 

CHARLES COLEMAN THACH, M. A., 
Professor of English and Political Economy. 

GEORGE PETRIE, M. A., Ph. D., 
Professor of History and Latin. 

♦BENNETT BATTLE ROSS, M. Sc, 
Professor of General and Agricultural Chemistry and State Chemist. 

JOHN JENKINS WILMORE, M. E., 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director of Laboratory. 

CHARLES ALLEN CARY, B. So., D. V. M., 
Professor of Physiology and Veterinary Science. 

EMERSON R. MILLER, Phar. M., M. Sc, 
Professor of Pharmacy. 

JOHN FREDERICK DUGGAR, M. Sc, 
Professor of Agriculture. 

FRANK SUMNER EARLE, * 

Professor of Biology and Horticulture. 

i' . • 

ARTHUR ST. CHARLES DUNSTAN, M. E., C. E., 
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Physics. 

JOHN EDWARD WIATT, M. A., 
Professor of Modern Languages. 

BOLLING HALL CRENSHAW, M. E., 
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics. 

BENJAMIN SWEAT PATRICK, E. & M. E., 
Commandant and Acting Professor of Military Science. 

PAUL INGOLD MURRILL, M. Sc, Ph. D. , 
Acting Professor of General and Agricultural Chemistry. 



* A. (went on leave, at University in Germany 



207893 



— *■■»-■*»- 



■I . I 



HENRY HEARST KYSER, E. & M. E., 
Assistant Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering. 

MICHAEL THOMAS FULLAN, M. Sc, 
Assistant Professor of Mechanic Arts. 

CLIFFORD LeROY HARE, M. Sc, 
Instructor Chemical Laboratory. 

ROBERT JEFFERSON TRAMMELL, C. E., 
Instructor in Mechanic Arts. 

WILLIAM OSCAR SCROGGS, M. Sc, 
Assistant Librarian and Assistant in English. 

(a) WILLIAM WELCH HILL, E. & M. E., 
Assistant in Mechanic Arts. 

HARRY STREETY HOUGHTON, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Chemistry. 

JAMES RICHARD RUTLAND, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Sub-Freshman English and Mathematics. 

JOHN WILLIAM JEPSON, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Electrical Engineering. 

CHARLES LEWIS HAROLD, B. Sc, 
Assistant in English. 

WILLIAM CHRISTOPHER MARTIN, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Civil Engineering and Drawing. 

(b) EDWARD ZELLARS HEARD, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Mechanic Arts. 

CHARLES WELLINGTON NIXON, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Chemistry. 

fc) ELLIS MADISON DUNCAN, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Veterinary Science. 

JESSE WRIGHT BOYD, B Sc, 
Assistant in Latin and History. 

ENOCH MARVIN MASON, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Biology and Pharmacy. 

ARTHUR FLOURNOY JACKSON, 
Student Assistant in charge of Gymnasium. 



j 



S ^PP°! n t e< l yarch 6th, vice T. H. McAdorv resiened 
trt Appointed Janunrv 1st, vice H P Powell mi™*i 
<e) Appointed March 1st, vice E. A. MtH« %^?nSd? 






COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

Committee on Discipline, 
Professors Smith, Thach, Mell. 

Committee on Entrance Examination, 
Professors Smith, Thach, Petrie. 

Committee on Examination of Special Students. 
Professors Wilmore, Dunstan, Miller. 

Committee on Public Lectures, 
Professors Petrie, Dunstan, Kyser. 

Committee on Library, 
Professors Thach, Petrie, Wiatt. 

Committee on Athletics, 
Professors Ross, Mell, Dunstan, Kyser, Petrie. 

Superintendent of Grounds and Buildings, 
Professor Wilmore. 

Curator of Museum, 
' Professor Mell. 

Secretary of Alumni Record, 
Professor Crenshaw. 



I 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. 



COMMITTEE OF TRUSTEES ON EXPERIMENT STATION. 

Thos. Williams Wetumpka, Ala. 

Jonathan Haralson * — Selma, Ala. 

STATION COUNCIL. 

Wm. LeRoy Broun .' President. 

P. H. Mell Director and Botanist. 

B. B. Ross Chemist. 

C. A. Cary, D. V. M. Veterinarian. 

J. F. Duggar Agriculturist. 

F. S. Earle, Biologist and Horticulturist. 

J. T. Anderson Associate Chemist. 

ASSISTANTS. 

C. L. Hare pi rst Assistant Chemist. 

*C. W. Nixon . . Second Assistant Chemist. 

H. S. Houghton Third Assistant Chemist. 

T. U. Culver Superintendent of Farm. 

R. W. Clark Assistant Agriculturist. 

C F. Austin Assistant Horticulturist. 

C. F. Boyd Assistant to Director. 

OFFICER IN CHARGE OF FARMERS' INSTITUTES. 

Dr. C. A. Cary. 

♦Appointed Feb. 3st, yice J. Q. Burton, resigned. 



( 



The Institute is a distinctive school of Science and 
its applications; being also the State College for the 
benefit of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts established 
by the State in 1872, by endowing it with the land-grant 
appropriation made by the U. S. Congress in 1862. 

The leading object of the Institute, in conformity with 
the act of Congress and the acts of the State Legislature, 
is to teach the principles and applications of science. 

In its course of instruction it gives prominence to the 
sciences and their applications, especially to those that 
relate to agriculture and the mechanic arts ; and at the 
same time the discipline and liberal education obtained 
by the study of language and other sciences are not neg- 
lected. 

All students are required to study the English lan- 
guage. The Latin, French and German languages are 
also taught, and opportunity for their study is offered to 
students in any course. 

The special and technical instruction given is thus 
based on a sound, general education. 

In its different courses of education, work of great 
value to the youth of the State is accomplished by fitting 
them by a thorough science-discipline, in which manual 
training in the lower classes is made a prominent feature 
for the successful and honorable performance of the 
responsible duties of life. 

While every attention is given to the mental discipline 
of the students in endeavoring to train them to habits 
of accurate scientific thought, and thus to qualify them 
for the duties of life, their moral and Christian training 
will always constitute the prominent care and thought 
of the Faculty. The Institute thus endeavors to educate 
as w r ell as instruct, to form character as well as give in- 
formation of value. 



8 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



LABORATORIES AND FACILITIES FOR 

INSTRUCTION. 

The Institute now possesses facilities for giving 
laboratory instruction in applied science in the follow* 
ing departments : " < * ■ * • ■ 

I— IX AGRICULTURE AND HORTICULTURE. 

The farm contains 304 acres, and is supplied with 
illustrative specimens of stock of select varieties. 

The agricultural experiment station, established in 
connection with the College, where experiments and 
scientific investigations relating to agriculture are daily 
made, affords unusual opportunities to students to be- 
come familiar with agriculture, its defects and remedies. 

The students of agriculture accompany the professor 
in the field, garden, conservatory, stock-yard, etc., where 
lectures are delivered in the presence of the objects dis- 
cussed, and during the year exercises in practical agri- 
culture of an educational character are given the stu- 
dents who entered upon this course of study. 

II — IN MECHANIC ARTS. 

The laboratory of mechanic arts is used as an aux- 
iliary in industrial education, and as a school of manual 
train ng in the arts that constitute the foundation of 
various industrial pursuits. The work performed by the 
students is instructive in character, as in any othe- 



, 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 9 

laboratory, and the classes are taught in sections by a 
series of graded lessons under the supervision of the 
professor. In the lower classes of the Institute each stu- 
dent enters this school and is assigned three exercises a 
week, each exercise being two hours long. 

The object of this laboratory is not to teach a trade, 
but to educate, to discipline and train the eye and the 
luiud, as well as the mind, and thus by associating 
manual and mental training, to educate thoroughly the 
student for the duties of life, whatever may be his voca- 
tion. There is no attempt to teach students special skill 
in constructing articles of commercial value, but all the 
exercises are systematically arranged and designed for 
purposes of education. 

The wood department is located in a commodious hall, 
90x50 feet, and is provided with a twenty-five horse- 
power Corliss engine, a planer, circular saw, band-saw, 
two scroll saws, a buzz planer, a pattern maker's lathe, 
twenty-four stands, each with a lathe and a full set of 
tools, and thirty benches for carpenter work with the 
tools requisite for construction. 

A brick building, 52x87 feet, with two rooms, has been 
constructed especially for instruction in working iron. 

One room is equipped with twenty-four forges and 
tools required for a forge department, and the other with 
a Colliau cupola furnace, a core oven, a brass furnace^ 
molding benches, foundry crane constructed by students,, 
and special tools for use in a foundry. 

The forge and foundry rooms are furnished with a 
fan and exhauster, supplied with power from an engine, 
constructed by the students in mechanic arts. 

The machine department occupies a brick building, 
30x50 feet, and is equipped with eleven engine lathes, 
one speed lathe, one 20-inch drill press, one iO-inch sensi- 



10 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 






tive drill, one 16-inch shaper, one 5-foot planer, one uni- 
versal milling machine, a corundum tool grinder, a small 
emery grinder, a No. 1 Brown & Sharpe universal grind- 
ing machine, and a power hack saw- 

The chipping and filing department is arranged with 
benches, vises and tools for twelve students. 

The tool room is well supplied with special tools for 

use in instruction, including a machine for grinding 

twist drills. The rooms are .lighted with electricity 
Avhenever necessary. 



Ill — IN PRACTICAL CHEMISTRY./ 

The chemical laboratory is supplied with modern ap- 
paratus, and in its equipment affords excellent facilities 
for instruction in practical chemistry and for investiga- 
tion. 

The investigations that are undertaken in this labora- 
tory by scientific experts, in connection with the work 
of the agricultural experiment station, are of especial 
value to advanced students, and afford them unusual 
opportunities to learn the methods of scientific research. 

The building contains a large general laboratory that 
accommodates sixly^fudents, a special laboratory for 
Seniors that will accommodate thirty students, a lecture 
room with a capacity for one hundred seats, and nine 
other rooms, all appropriated to instruction and research 
in chemistry. 

IV— IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 



The electrical laboratory is well supplied with modern 
appliances for instruction in electrical engineering. It 
occupies three large rooms in the basement and is 
equipped with many fine instruments of precision. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 11 

In addition to resistance boxes, bridges, condensers, 
galvanometers, dynamometers, wattmeters, photom- 
eters, and other laboratory instruments, the depart- 
ment is supplied with representatives of the best types 
of commercial electrical instruments from foreign and 
domestic makers. 

The laboratory is also equipped with apparatus for 
making break-down tests of insulating materials, up to 
30,000 volts, also with spectroscopic apparatus for test- 
ing the quality of arc light carbons. 

The dynamos occupy a separate building and are oper- 
ated by a twenty-five horse power Atlas engine, and a 
thirty-five horse power Westinghouse engine. In this 
building are installed the following dynamos : 

Edison compound 12 Kilo-watt generator, Thomson- 
Houston 150 light 110 volt dynamo, Weston 150 volt 25 
ampere generator, Crocker-Wheeler one horse power 
motor, Ideal 3 phase alternator, Brush 6 arc light dy- 
namo with lamps, two Baxter street car motors, 20 horse 
power each (so connected as/to be used as direct or alter- 
nating current motors or generators), one 5 horse power 
three phase motor, one General Electric 20 horse power 
motor, one 40 light shunt dvnamo, one Edison 3 Kilo- 

7 c> \J 7 

watt generator, one Stanley induction motor with con- 
densers, two bi-phase induction motors (built by stu- 
dents), one 9 light Thomson-Houston arc machine, two 
phase alternator and 500 volt 20 ampere generator, made 
by students. There is also in connection with this de- 
partment at the experiment station, a ten horse power 
motor, made by students, which is operated by the 500 
volt generator in the dynamo room. 



12 



ALA1U JIA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE. 



■ 
■ 



V — IN PHYSICS. 

The physical laboratory occupies two rooms, one of 
these being permanently darkened for experimental 
work in light. 

It is equipped with numerous standard instruments 
of precision, such as verniers, micrometers, cathetom- 
eters, a horizontal comparator, a Kater's reversion 
pendulum, balances, etc., and a quantity of minor appa- 
ratus. 

Recently there has been added a concave grating spec- 
trograph, a large induction coil of .12 inch spark, and 
other apparatus of value. 

VI — IX MINERALOGY. 

This laboratory occupies a convenient room in the 
basement, and is provided with tables and appliances to 
accommodate thirty students, with an excellent collec- 
tion of minerals. 

VII — IN, BOTANY. 

In the work of the agricultural , experiment station 
there is a botanical garden under the charge of the pro- 
fessor of botany; investigations in botany are given 
special attention, and opportunities are offered* ad- 
vanced students for practical work in a laboratorv es- 
pecially fitted with microscopes, tables, a dark room for 
photographic work, and appliances needed for instruc- 
tion and research. This department is provided with 
Auzoux's clastic models of seeds and flowers for teach- 
ing botany. 

VIII. — IN BIOLOGY. • 

The laboratory in this department adjoins the lecture 
room of the professor, and is furnished with tables, ex- 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



13 



•eellent microscopes and appliances for investigation. 
Each student of the class works under the supervision 
of the professor. 

IX — IN ENGINEERING AND SURVEYING. 



The necessary apparatus for field work, including 
transits, levels, plane table, models of bridges, etc., is 
provided for the use of the students, and the cusfomarv 
exercises in the field are given. 

N — IN DRAWING. 

All students in the lower classes are required to take 
drawing, a study which tends to discipline the mind, as 
well as to train the eye and hand to accuracy of observa- 
tion and execution. A large, well-lighted drawing room, 
which will accomodate fifty students, is provided with 
tables, lock-boxes, etc. 

XI — IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

The mechanical course has been extended to include 
experimental work in mechanical engineering. 

The apparatus available for this instruction is as fol- 
lows : A 45-horse power Imperial Cross compound en- 
gine, especially arranged for experimental Avork, sup- 
plied with Wheeler surface condenser and Deanc? air 
pump and circulating pump, a 25-horse power Harris- 
Corliss engine, a 35 horse power Westinghouse engine, 
two 9 horse power engines constructed by students, the 
boilers belonging to the regular power plant, a Deane 
duplex steam pump, a 4-horse power gasoline engine, an 
Ericsson hot air engine, a New York air pump, a West- 
inghouse air pump, four steam engine indicators, a sepa- 
rating calorimeter, thermometers, a pyrometer, scales, 



— — 



14 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



a standard steam gauge with apparatus for testing 
steam gauges, a Crosby dead weight tester with weights 
for correcting the standard gauge, a 35,000-pound test- 
ing machine, a Henning micrometer extensometer, and 
a Carpenter calorimeter with, the necessary auxiliary 
apparatus for determining the heating value of different 
kinds of coal. 

Thi§ work is now carried on in the lower story of the 
annex to the chemical laboratory. This room is 30x60 
feet in size and was specially designed and fitted up 
for this purpose. A three-inch steam main has been laid 
from the boiler house, thus securing a steam supply in 
the building for all work requiring it. The work is thor- 
oughly practical, and it is desired to extend it as rapidly 
as the funds available for the purchase of apparatus will 
allow. 



XII — IN PHYSIOLOGY AND VETERINARY SCIENCE. 

There has been constructed for the veterinary depart- 
ment a new and separate two-story building with nine 
rooms. It is provided with lecture room, office, working 
and operating rooms for clinical practice, and museum 



with skeletons of the domestic animals for instruction. 
Free clinics are given every Saturday for the benefit of 
the students in veterinary science. 

There is a separate dissecting room constructed, with 
cement floor and north roof light especially for ihis de- 
partment. This Laboratory is used by the professor 
and students each afternoon for three months. 



XIII— IN PHARMACY. 

The laboratory of this department occupies the second 
floor of the annex to chemical laboratory, and is pro- 



ALAKAMA PortfTECHNIC INSTITUTE* 15 

vided with a sufficient supply of drugs and apparatus 
necessary for instruction in pharmaceutical prepara- 
tions. 

The students work in the laboratory with the profes- 
sor, from five to eight hours, six days in the week. 

The facilities are increased as means are available. 

MILITARY TACTICS. 

Instruction in this department is given in conformity 
with the act of Congress. Students receive the benefit of 
regular military drill, and in addition the military sys- 
tem is used as a means of enforcing discipline and secur- 
ing good order, promptness and regularity in the per- 
formance of academic duties. 

This department is supplied witli cadet rifles and 
accoutrements for the corps. 






16 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

COLLEGE BUILDINGS. 

The frontispiece is a representation of the main College building. 
It is 160 x 71 feet and contains forty-five rooms. This building is 
not used for dormitories for students, but is appropriated to pur- 
poses of instruction and investigation. 

It contains the lecture rooms and offices of the professors, labora- 
tories, library, museum, armory, etc. 

LANGDON HALL. 

This is a two-story building, 90 x 50 feet. The second story is the 
audience hall, used for commencement and other public occasions. 
The first story is appropriated to the laboratory of mechanic arts. 

THE CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

As shown on the opposite page this is a two story structure, 40 by 
60 feet, with a rear projection, 35 by 60 feet, of one-story and base- 
ment, and contains eight rooms. The exterior is of pressed brick, 
with cut stone trimmings and terra cotta ornamentation. 

In the basement are ample accommodations for assaying and 
storage. 

The main laboratory will accommodate sixty students, and con- 
tains improved working tables, with water, gas and every necessary 
appliance for chemical work. 

The laboratory for advanced work in chemistry will accommodate 
thirty students and is equipped in the same manner. Adjoining this 
are two rooms "which are used respectively as a balance room, and 
a room for work with spectroscope, polariscope, etc. 

The second story contains a lecture room with seats and tablets 
for eighty students. Around the lecture room are cases containing 
crude and manufactured products, illustrating agricultural and 
mechanical chemistry, prominent subjects taught in the institution. 

ANNEX TO CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

This is a three-story brick building, containing rooms for phar- 
macy, mechanical engineering, and drawing. 

The Chemical Laboratory for the Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion occupies a building 60 by 26 feet and is appropriated exclusively 
for chemical investigation and research, and not for instruction. 






v 



■I 



1 



HONOR ROLL FOR CONDUCT, IN 1900. 



The following cadets having received no demerits during the year, 
their names are placed upon the honor roll for good conduct: 

SUB-FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Haynie, C. D. Rutledge, C. P. 

Jones, A. D. Stewart, B. M. 

Matthews, J. V. Williamson, G. T. 

Roberts, R. H. , Sullivan, H. J. 

SPECIAL AND IRREGULAR STUDENTS. 

Brannon, P. A. Marks, G. M. 

Crumpler, L. H. Rennie, A. K. 

Cameron, W. J. Reid, H. V. 

Conner, H. H. Sargent, H. O. 

Haigler, W. H. Sellers, W. A. 

Stickle, H. S. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 



Allen, G. W. 
Bize, M. L. 
Bruister, W. J. 
Chipley, D. 
Davis, H. E. 
Davis, W. W. 
Goldthwaite, C. B. 
Halsey, W. L. 
Hawkins, H. C. 
Hill, G. B. 
Horn, A. G. 
Hunt, F. E. 



Jordan, I. L. 
Kauffman, R. 
Knight, W. J. 
Matson, T. H. 

Maberry, E. L. 
McLain, A. D. 
Mitchell, J. H. 
Preuit, G. N. 
Rhodes, R. G. 
Thornton, W. L. 
Walker, I. W. 
Yonge, H. M. 



Moseley, W. F. 

•SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



Askew, W. M. 
Dawson, R. G. 
Ellis, M. 

Hamilton, W. B. 
Houston, F. J. 
Johnson, C. J. 



Kyser, J. A. 
Swanson, J. G. 
Snedecor, G. W. 
Wallace, C. N. 
Webb, J. O. 
Willis, W. D. 



Yonge, J. E. D. 



o 



A- 



18 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



junior CLASS. 



Arnold, R. T. 
Bivings, F. C. 
Bragg, T. 

Eagar, W. II. 
Fitch, H. L. 
Felton, L. M. 
Foy, J. D. 
Goggans, J. 0. 
Haley, P. S. 
Jackson, A. F. 
Kahn, M. D. 



Ashcraft, F. 
Beeson, M. A. 
Boyd, G. F. 
Boyd, J. W. 
Brooks, M. M. 
Bukofzer, E. 
Culver, A. N. 
Dowdell, W. C. 
Duncan, E. M. 
Duncan, L. N. 
Flowers, J. J. 
Hall, H. Y. 
Hall, R. B. 
Heard, E. Z. 
Illges, J. P. 



Kelly, E. 
Killebrew, E. S. 
Letcher, J. T. 

McCrary, W. D. 
McGehee, W. B. 
Meriwether, B. B. 
Parker, D. J. 
Smith, H. M. 
Turpin, M. C. 
Werner, H. E. 
Williams, J. C. 



SENIOR CLASS. 



Jepson, J. W. 
Kahn, M. F. 
Kelley, W. E. 
Martin, W. C. 
Maples, J. . 
Mason, E. M. 
McGehee, J. H. 
Miller, E. A. 
Nixon, C. W. 
Osburn, W. F. 
Powell, H. P. 
Rutland, J. R. 
Rutledge, W. S. 
Shuff, J. W. 




GRADUATES IN 1900. 



CLASS OF 1900. 



HONOR GRADUATES. 

COURSE IN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

John William Jepson South Carolina 

COURSE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

William Christopher Martin Barbour 

GENERAL COURSE. 

Charles Lewis Harold Escambia 

COURSE IN PHARMACY. 

Enoch Marvin Mason . . . Lee 

DEGREES. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. 

Frank Hunter Anderson Bullock 

William Lawrence Anderson Montgomery 

Fletcher Ashcraft Lauderdale 

Malcolm Alfred Beeson Etowah 

John Samuel Black Lee 

Guy French Boyd Lee 

Jesse Wright Boyd Lee 

Millard Morse Brooks .Escambia 

Edwin Bukofzer Tennessee 

Ruf us W T hite Butler Lee 

Judson Lamar Burke Lee 

Andrew Crozier Cameron Jefferson 

Sallie McGehee Clark Montgomery 

Asbury Nicholson Culver Lee 

Emma Beall Culver Lee 

William Crawford Dowdell Lee 

Ellis Madison Duncan Franklin 

Luther Noble Duncan Franklin 

Rutherford Sylvanus Finch Montgomery 

John Jefferson Flowers Butler 

Erie Humphreys Foy Barbour 

Bertha Mae Grout Lee 



■B 



20 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

Roland B Hall Georgia 

Harry Young Hall * Jefferson 

Charles Lewis Harold • Escambia 

Edward Zellars Heard Lee 

Mabel Heard .- • Lee 

Mary Katherine Hollifield Leo 

George Martin Illges Montgomery 

John William Jepson South Carolina 

Walter Eldrade Johnson Madison 

Moses Frank Kahn Lee 

Wilbur Edrald Kelley Jefferson 

John Maples Russell 

William Christopher Martin Barbour 

Enoch Marvin Mason Lee 

James Hardie McGehee Montgomery 

<Jraham Edwin Merchant Lee 

Edward Andrew Miller Marshall 

William Livingston Neill Jefferson 

Charles Wellington Nixon . . Tennessee 

vVilliam Forney Osburn Lee 

Hiram Perry Powell Georgia 

Fleming James Rigney Madison 

James Richard Rutland Chambers 

William Stowe Rutledge Lee 

* rederick Blount Shepard Mobile 

Mary Robbins Sampey Conecuh 

John Winf red Shuff Talladega 

Joseph Manning Steiner Butler 

Moses Conrad Wright Macon 

MASTER OF SCIENCE. 

Robert Higgins Adams Pike 

Bailey Edgar Brown ; Morgan 

Walter Eldrade Johnson Madison 

Kate Meade Lane L ee 

William Oscar Scroggs Georgia 

CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

Arthur Henry Feagin Barbour 

ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEER. 

Thomas Hennington McAdory Jefferson 

Isham Fennell McDonnell Madison 



DISTINGUISHED STUDENTS 



Students who receive a grade above 90 in three studies in the fresh- 
man class, in four in the Sophomore, in five in the 
Junior, and in six in (the Senior, are dis- 
guished for excellence in scholar- 
ship, and are awarded 

HONOR CERTIFICATES. 

The following students received honor certificates in 1900: 

SENIOR CLASS. 

Malcolm Alfred Beeson Etowah 

John Samuel Black Lee 

Jesse Wright Boyd Lee 

Edwin Bukofzer Tennessee 

Sallie McGehee Clark Montgomery- 
Emma Beall Culver Lee 

William Crawford Dowdell Lee 

Luther Noble Duncan Franklin 

Bertha Mae Grout Lee 

Roland B. Hall Georgia 

Harry Young Hall . Jefferson 

Charles Lewis Harold Escambia 

Mary Katherine Hollifield Lee 

John William Jepson South Carolina 

Moses Frank Kahn L© e 

William Christopher Martin Barbour 

Enoch Marvin Mason Lee 

Edward Andrew Miller Marshall 

Charles Wellington Nixon Tennessee 

William Forney Osburn • • Lee 

Fleming James Rigney Madison 

James Richard Rutland Chambers 

Mary Robbins Sampey Conecuh 



» 



22 Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 

honor students in the junior class. 

COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 

Thomas Bragg Lee 

COURSE IN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

Eugene Flynn Enslen Jefferson 

CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

Paul Shields Haley Walker 

GENERAL COURSE. 

John Talbert Letcher Macon 

COURSE IN PHARMACY. 

William Boyd McGehee Montgomery 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Robertson Tanner Arnold Florida 

Herschel Winston Bass St. Clair 

Thomas Bragg Lee 

William Hamilton Eagar Winston 

Eugene Flynn Enslen Jefferson 

John Drewry Foy Barbour 

Paul Shields Haley * . . Walker 

Arthur Flournoy Jackson ' Georgia 

William Boyd McGehee Montgomery 

Emmett Stephens Killebrew Dale 

John Talbert Letcher Macon 

Karl Edward Lindrose Mississippi 

Isaac Lenoir Moore Lee 

Dorsey Julian Parker Escambia 

Shepherd Harrison Roberts Montgomery 

Louis Sternfeld Montgomery 

henry Edward Werner Texas 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

William Warren Askew . . .". Georgia 

William Cruse Coles Marshall 

Jesse Duncan Elliott Minnesota 

Marvin Ellis Morgan 

James Browder Garber Hale 

Morris Ketchum N ew York 

James Allen Kyser . # Dallas 

Martin James Lide Dallas 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 23 

k 

Richard Blount Shepard Mobile 

George Waddell Snedecor Jefferson 

John Griffin Swanson Macon 

Walker Dorr Willis Florida 

John Eayres Davis Yonge Florida. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Dudley Chipley Florida 

Earl Cline Jefferson 

Sidney Cornell Jefferson 

Howard Ellis Davis Mobile 

\v illiam Watson Davis Mobile 

Thomas Joseph Dowdell Montgomery 

William Lanier Halsey Madison 

Frank Edward Hun Jefferson 

Roy Kauffman Mobile 

Walter Joseph Knight Mobile 

Thomas Hatcher Matson Talladega 

John Harris Mitchell Georgia 

Gregg Newton Preuit Lawrence 

Russell Bates Preuit Lawrence 

William Watson Rutland Chambers 

William Lawson Thornton Talladega 

Ivy Whitson Walker Colbert 

Henry Mathews Yonge Florida 



— etff ALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



FOR THE SESSION OF 1900-1901. 



GRADUATE STUDENTS. 

[Residence in Alabama ivhen State is not given.] 
NAME. RESIDENCE. 

Guy French Boyd . Lee 

Jesse Wright Boyd Lee 

Mattie Lucile Burton Lee 

Toccoa Cozart Lee 

Emma Beall Culver Lee 

Ellis Madison Duncan Franklin 

Charles Lewis Harold Escambia 

Edward Zellars Heard Lee 

Mabel Heard . . Lee 

John William Jepson South Carolina 

WilliaLm Christopher Martin Barbour 

Enoch Marvin Mason Lee 

Edward Andrew Miller Marshall 

James Lewis Molder Chambers 

Charles Wellington Nixon Tennessee 

Hiram Perry Powell Georgia 

James Richard Rutland Chambers 



UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS. 



SENIOR CLASS. 



Robertson Tanner Arnold Florida 

Herschel Winston Bass St. Clair 

Idaline Bell Lee 

Frank Carlisle Bivings Georgia 

Kenneth Bradford Montgomery' 

Thomas Bragg Lee 



\ 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



25 



Samuel Hamner Browne Tuscaloosa 

Salmon Holmes Burns Lee 

David James Castleman Hale 

Herschel Henry Conner Macon 

William Hamilton Eagar . . .Winston 

Eugene Flynn Enslen Jefferson 

LeRov Madison Felton South Carolina 

John Drewry Foy Barbour 

James Olney Goggans Tallapoosa 

Walter Lee Greene Lee 

William Hope Haigler Montgomery 

Paul Shields Haley Walker 

Alexander Cameron Hannon . . . Montgomery 

Michael Smith Harvey Lee 

Charles Henry Haynes • Bullock 

Daniel Hagood Haynes Dallas 

James Kelly Haynie Montgomery 

Arber Samuel Hertz Georgia 

Robert Holland Hood Jefferson 

Arthur Flournoy Jackson Georgia 

James Baxter Jackson • • • • Lee 

Jefferson Franklin Jones Sumter 

Myron Daniel Kahn Lee 

Claude Kauffman : Mobile 

Emmett Stephens Killebrew Dale 

William Reid Lancaster • • • Lee 

John Talbert Letcher • Macon * 

Karl Edward Lindrose Mississippi 

Walter Deems McCrary Lee 

William Boyd McGehee Montgomery 

Benjamin Baldwin Meriwether .Montgomery 

Abram Hill Mitchell ••••■• Lee 

Isaac Lenoir Moore • • • • Lee 

Merrill Hastings Moore Montgomery 

William Louis Noll Tennessee 



"26 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

« 

Dorsey Julian Parker Escambia 

James Cochran Phelps Lee 

James Blackmon Powell Bullock 

Shepherd Harrison Roberts Montgomery 

Harvey Owen Sargent Franklin 

Oscar Menderson Schloss. Barbour 

Lyman Hall Shaw Sumter 

Henry Alexander Skeggs Morgan 

John Hunt Skeggs Morgan 

Matthew Scott Sloan Mobile 

Holland McTyeire Smith Lee 

Louis Sternfeld ".'...;... Montgomery 

Oodfrey Rhodes Thomas Sumter 

Manly Curry Turpin Virginia 

Henry Edward Werner Texas 

Leonidas Wharton Cherokee 

Oaius Whitfield Maren°x> 

Jere Crawford Williams Lee 

John Rutledgc AVilliams Jefferson 

Edward Houston Wills Lee 

JUNIOR cla^s. 

Oliver Hannibal Alford .. /. , /,, . . . . .Marshall 

William Warren Askew Georgia 

Frederick Cornelius Atkinson to . Dale 

Charles Homer Billingsley Elmore 

Edward Lambeth Carroll Florida 

William Cruse Coles Marshall 

Clyde Allen Collins . . Hale 

Alpheus Mallette Davis Florida 

Robert Geoghegan Dawson Montgomery 

Jesse Duncan Elliott Minnesota 

Marvin Ellis ...;... Morgan 

James Douglas Farley .' j jee 







Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



27 



Clarence Eugene Feagin Bullock 

James Browder Garber Hale 

Arthur Rodfer Gray Florida 

Jeremiah Warren Gwin Jefferson 

William Houston Gwin Jefferson 

William Bulger Hamilton Elmore 

Clinton Duane H'aynie Lee 

William Tillman Heard Lee 

Oscar Lynn Henry . . . Marshall 

Dallas Tabor Herndon . Henry 

Franklin Jerome Houston Jefferson 

Collins James Johnson Missouri 

Albert Sidney Johnson Colbert 

Morris Ketchum New York 

Howard Malcolm Kilpatrick Georgia 

James Allen Kyser Dallas 

Martin James Lide Dallas 

Gaston Joel Lipscomb Marengo 

Earle Irwin McBryde , .Wilcox 

Thomas Michael McCarroll Florida 

Francis Schroeder Montgomery Etowah 

Henry Bigham Park Georgia 

Douglass Welles Peabody Mobile 

Edgar Johnson Pierce • • • Bullock 

Daniel Syers Robertson Chambers 

Richard Blount Shepard Mobile 

Julian Cassius Smith Macon. 

George Waddell Snedecor • • Jefferson 

Enrico Alfonso Washington Georgia 

Clifford Noble Wallace Elmore 

John Osceola Webb Tallapoosa 

Walker Dorr Willis Florida 

Forney Renfro Yarbrough Georgia 

John Eayres Davis Yonge Florida 






28 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

sophomore class. 

George Whitfield Allen Jefferson 

Albert Miner Avery Florida 

James Victor Blackwell Calhoun 

Edward Jefferson Bruister . Choctaw 

Bush Pearson Burke * . . . Montgomery 

Thomas Arthur Caddell Etowah 

William Julius James Chase Georgia 

Dudley Chipley . Florida 

William Hudmon Cooper Lee 

Sidnev Cornell Jefferson 

Walter Thomas Credille Georgia 

Charles Sanders Culver . . . . Lee 

Howard Ellis Davis Mobile 

William Watson Davis .' Mobile 

William Wert Dinsmore Morgan 

Thomas Joseph Dowdell Montgomery 

Isaac Ball Feagin Bullock 

t William Eugene Finch Florida 

George Bridges Foss Etowah 

Charles Belshaw Goldthwaite Pike 

William Lanier Halsey Madison 

Millard Harwell . . Lee 

Earnest Cecil Haynie Lee 

Bell George Hazard Calhoun 

Henry Hiden -. . Jefferson 

George Bloise Hill Talladega 

William Hill Etowah 

Alexander Grice Horn Sumter 

John David Hudson Lee 

James Daughtry Hudson Georgia 

Frank Edward Hunt Jefferson 

vlra LaFayette Jordan Bullock. 

tNot in full standing. 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 29 

William George Kama than Choctaw 

Roy Kauffman Mobile 

Walter Joseph Knight Mobile 

John Fulton Lanier Madison 

Carl Lay . . Etowah 

George Duncan Lesesne Mobile 

Percv McLean Marshall Georgia 

Winfleld Scott Martin Mississippi 

John Van Valkenburg Matthews Madison 

Thomas Hatcher Matson Talladega 

fErnest Lynnwood Mayberry 4 . Macon 

Allen Davis McLain Lee 

Kobert Pevton Minis Jefferson 

John Harris Mitchell Georgia 

William Pitman Moon Coosa 

Thomas William Morgan Jefferson 

James Porter Paterson Montgomery 

Christopher Henderson Pinson Suiiiter 

f Albert Wellman Pratt Madison 

David Philips Pruett • Bullock 

Wallace Powers Pruitt Lowndes 

George Daniel Handle • . Jefferson 

James Henry Handle Bullock 

John Patrick Rembert Mississippi 

Paul Kigney .• •••••• Madison 

William Richard Bison : • • • Madisoo 

tR/oy Gustavus Rhodes Marengo 

Tod Hewitt Roberts • • • Jefferson 

William Watson Rutland Chambers 

Clifford Philip Rutledge Lee 

Hans Schmidt Jefferson 

Edmund Rhett Taber • • Montgomery 

Edward Taylor • • Marengo 

Louis Earle Thornton Florida 

t Not in full standing. 



30 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

t 

William Lawson Thornton Talladega 

James Feagin Tompkins — . Lee 

Filo Harris Turner Florida 

William Micou Turnley Elmore 

Ivv Wliitson Walker Colbert 

Joseph Dorrah Walker Jefferson 

Walter Harry Wiley Pike 

Ira Dateman Williams Elmore 

Henry Mathews Yonge Florida 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

y William Nevin Adkins Georgia 

Henry Alexander Allison Sumter 

William Leroy Alston South Carolina 

Frank Gordon Bell Lowndes 

f William Henry Bell Lowndes 

f Nathan Arnold Beringer Barbour 

Irby Boyd Pike 

Jefferson Edward Brown ? Pike 

Borden Montgomery Campbell Eutaw 

Julian Sidney Chambers Montgomery 

Alan Armstead Chester Ne\v r York 

James Henderson Childs Georgia 

William Lawrence Dumas Mobile 

Earlie Roy Emrick ". . ... Jefferson 

Frank Trimble Evans Georgia 

Clarence Evelyne Field Jefferson 

Joseph Cochrane Franklin Bullock 

Frederick Emanuel Gerbel Montgomery 

Walter Summerville Going Jefferson 

James Buchanan Green Crenshaw 

Elmus Knowles Hanby Jefferson 

Walter Leonidas Harwell Lee 

Guy David Hawkins Jefferson 

t Not in full standing. 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 81 

fClay Irby Hudson . . . Lee 

Robert Walter Huey Jefferson 

Charles Jefferson Jackson Montgomery 

Max Gordon Jepson South Carolina 

Arthur Dean Jones Pike 

Allen Green Jones . . Dallas 

Chauncey Smith Joseph Montgomery 

Thomas Jefferson Killebrew ....... .«. . Dale 

Edward Philip Lacey Jefferson 

Trapy Lay Etowah 

Francis Lyon Lowndes. 

Thomas VanRensaler Matthews Calhoun 

Isaac Sadler McAdory Jefferson 

John William McConnell Jefferson 

John McDuifie Monroe 

Henry McDonnell Madison 

Thomas Pettus McElderry Talladega 

William Monroe Meredith Green 

Edward Adolphus Miles . . . Mobile 

Frederick Shealy Middleton Chambers. 

Lee Penn Montgomery Lee 

Andrew Blair Nelson Walker 

Fenton Forest Newman Talladega 

Fornev Renfro Lee 

Thomas Andrew Eiley Jefferson 

Richard Hoskins Roberts Sumter 

James Lon Robinson Jefferson 

Charles McPherson Rogers Sumter 

Oscar Early Rutland Lee 

John Van Ryan Madison 

Joseph McMurray Seabrook Talladega 

James Emmet Seale Sumter 

Frederick Samuel Shepherd Tennessee 

t Not in full standing. 



32 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



William Martin Shepard Mobile 

Berner Leigh Shi Georgia 

Washington Irving Shi Georgia 

Solomon Kauffman Simon Marengo 

Philip Ware Smith Chambers 

vJohn Deal Steele Greene 

Paul Stewart Jefferson 

John Randolph St. John . . . . Mobile 

Henry Jefferson Sullivan Washington 

y Benjamin Walton Taylor Jefferson 

Albert Lee Thomas . Lee 

John Walker Wakefield Talladega 

William Francis Ward Lee 

Thornton Albert Ward Lee 

Fletcher Peavy Whatley Lee 

George Traylor Williamson Lee 

John Mayer Wilson Clark 

William Mason Wilson Etowah 

John Washington Wood Jefferson 

SPECIAL AND IRREGULAR STUDENTS. 
Abbreviations: Ph — Pharmacy; E. & M. E. — Electrical and Mechan- 
ical Engineering; C. — Chemistry; Ag. — Agriculture; C. E. — Civil 
Engineering; M. A. — Mechanic Arts. 

NAME. RESIDENCE. 

Charles Pierce Anderson .ph. ... . Montgomery 

William Spaight Anderson Jefferson. 

Ralph Calloway Armstrong Lee 

Martin Vanburen Beason . Georgia 

Arthur Bernard Beringer. ...... .ph Barbour 

Marshall Leonard Bize Georgia 

Johnson Wilson Black Mobile 

*Moffatt Grier Bonner . W r ilcox 

W r illiam Jones Bonner e. & m. e.. . . . . . .Wilcox 

♦Deceased. 

t Not in full standing. 




w* 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



33 



Wallace Edward Brewster Georgia 

Andrew Henry Buchanan. . .ph. & vet. s. .Montgomery 

John Mangum Buchanan Lee 

Rufus White Butler ph . .Lee 

Arthur Ernest Carter ph Shelby 

William Hatchett Chandler Montgomery 

Willis Gaylord Clark e. & m. e Mobile 

Earl Cline Jefferson 

Joseph Henry Corrigan M. a Florida 

Lewis Henry Grumpier ph Talladega 

Francis Roy Daniel , Mobile 

George Parker Dexter Jefferson 

Wiley Frank Dorman Chambers 

Woodson Lee Ennis Sumter 

Martin Conner Folmar Pike 

Ingrahm Barron Foster ph Perry 

Albert Edward Gilbert ph Clay 

John Hunter Goddard . .ph Georgia 

Alexander Hamilton Green Florida 

Edward Putney Guerrant ag. . Kentucky 

Leslie Murphy Hand ............ ph Sumter 

James Coupon Harper c. e Mississippi 

William Bed well Harrell ph Choctaw 

Ethel Julia Harwell ."'...' . Lee 

Henry Clift Hawkins Lee 

Alvis Clift Hawkins Lee 

Alvis Perry Henderson Limestone 

William Jefferson Hearin Mobile 

Mollie Hal Hollifield Lee 

William Dana Hubbard Dallas 

Elbert Carter Jackson ph Pike 

Mell Frazer Jackson ph. & vet. s Lee 

John Samf ord Jewett .... ph ...... . Florida 

William Micou Jordan ph Elmore 

3 






34 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



} 



Edward Kelly . . . .* Montgomery 

Oscar Jennings Knox ph Lee 

Lottie Everard Lane Lee 

Daniel Stacy Martin. e. & m. e .Barbour 

Robert Murdoch Martin Barbour 

Jean Llorca-Marty Nicaragua 

Oliveria Masvidal .m. a. . Cuba 

Christian McDevitt Pennsylvania 

Herbert McLeod ph Pike 

Allen Massillon McNeel e. & m. e . . Montgomery 

William Robert Middleton Lowndes 

Fern Wood Mitchell . . Etowah 

Martin Theophilus Moody ph. . . . Calhoun 

James Crowder Moore ...... ph Lee 

Peter Preer Myluind vet. s. & ph Lee 

Carlyle Nisbet e. & m. 5. . Georgia 

Louis Milton Noll ph ... .Tennessee 

Sallie Fleming Ordway .... Tennessee 

William Freeman Owens . .ph Choctaw 

William Burns Patsrson AG . . . Montgomery 

Morris Pelham e. & m. e Calhoun 

Israel Pickens ph Hale 

Boiling Reigns Powell ph Montgomery 

Alston Keith Rennie ph Dallas 

Henry Virgil Beid ph..- Barbour 

Carl Robinson Tallapoosa 

Benjamin Riley Sawyer ; :i> H Calhoun 

Robert Houston Scruggs . a»H Sumtfcr 

George Clement Sequeira . . c. e.v. . . . Nicaragua 

Robert Ware Sistrunk iv * ..ph.. . . . . . . , Elmore 

Hiihter Macon Smith v ........... / Jefferson 



Brady Wilkinson Steele .ph 



auga 



Henry Sleeth Stickle , j.o. m , .'. . Lauderdale 

Ror<Eee ThorntoA^ .............. . . M^miuvwilL Bullock 



■ 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



35 



George Baker Tyson Montgomery 

Guy Hanson Upchurch ph Pickens 

Victor Vance Jefferson 

Luz Maria Washington Georgia 

Judson Franklin Webb c. e Lee 

Walter Rivers Whitman. m. a. . . . . .Lee 

Annie Lizzie Wright Lee 

SUB-FRESHMAN. 

Ha-ry Robert Adams Jefferson 

Thomas Eaton Alexander *. .Marengo 

f Robert Lehman Ashurst Tallapoosa 

Robert Tramniell Bagby. .< Lee 

Marvin Fitzpatrick Boykin Lee 

Thomas Quincy Bradford .» Marengo 

Thomas Cobb Bradford Lee 

Hubert Gillespie Brown Pike 

f George Washington Bryan. . .' Crenshaw 

James DeRasete Bryant. Wilcox 

Andrew Duke Cameron Macon 

Lemuel Jacob Cobb Cherokee 

Lynn Lewis Conner Macon 

Benjamin Peeples Cooper. Washington 

Paul Clifton Croft Etowah— __ 

James Louis Edwards Jefferson 

James Chester Elmer Mississippi 

Edgar Earl Ferrell Eutaw 

Benjamin Fitzpatrick . . . . ■ . . . . Montgomery 

Eugene Goldthwaite P^ e 

James Haynes Gumm • • • • • Georgia 

fHerbert Elwood Hawkins Lee 

fClute Bernard Hixon Covington 

James Elliott Holt Russell 

Charles Edwin Jackson Madison 

t Frank Qte y Johnson Florida 

t Not in full standing. 



36 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



Claude Boiling Jones Lowndes 

Hilery Boston Jones Baldwin 

Airy Carlisle Jordan Clarke 

Thomas Reeves Leavel Greene 

f Thomas Edward Long Perry 

Darrell Francis Marion Dallas 

Joel Angus MeGwier Colbert 

f Benjamin McMillan Mobile 

Jay Frank Morgan Georgia 

George Newburgh Montgomery Washington 

fCicero Lewis Nelson Baldwin 

f Benjamin Peeples Tennessee 

f Louis Amos Phillips Colbert 

John Henry Powell Lee 

f Marshall Go^v^n Price Marengo 

Edgar Hill Pritchett Wilcox 

Charles Eugene Rhodes Marengo 

Willis' Au tray Riley Covington 

Joseph Molton Sadler Lowndes 

Joseph Luther Selden Marengo 

f Samuel Homer Thornton Pike 

William Biggers Tucker Lee 

Elbert Fain Webb Cherokee 

Thomas Jefferson Webb Cherokee 

t James Samuel Webb L e e 

f Fletcher Gordon Webb. Lee 

Cullen Haddley Wimberly Sumter 

Thomas Pelham Winston * Lee 

Walter Scott Wilson Bullock 



t Not in full standing. 



A 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



37 



SUMMARY. 

Graduates 17 

Senior Class 61 

Junior Class 46 

Sophomore Class 75 

Freshman Class 75 

Special and Irregular .Students 83 



Total in College Classes 357 

Sub-Freshman Class . . 55 



Total 412 



NUMBER OF STUDENTS IN EACH SUBJECT OF STUDY. 



English 340 

History 208 

French 39 

German . . 36 

Latin 119 

Mental Science 19 

Political Economy ... 51 
Mathematics .... ...303 

Chemistry . . ...... .172 

Chemical Laboratory. . 150 

Agriculture . . 116 

Phvsics 228 

Botanv 97 

Horticulture 37 



Geology . . 58 

Civil Engineering .... 23 
Electrical Engineer'g.. 55 
Mechanical Engr'g. ... 57 

Biology 27 

Drawing 256 

Mechanic Arts . . ... .260 

Military Department.. 381 

Mineralogy 22 

Physical Laboratory. . . 66 

Physiology . . . . 100 

Veterinary Science ... 34 

Pharmacy . . 44 

Bacteriology 16 



r 



38 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

residence by states. ' j 

Alabama j .341 

Georgia 27 

Florida . . 17 ' 

Tennessee . . 7 

Mississippi 5 

South Carolina . . 4 

New York . . 2 

Nicaragua . . 2 

Cuba . . . . • . . , i 

Kentucky i 

Pennsylvania 1 

Virginia . . . . 1 

Texas \ t X 

Minnesota 1 

Missouri # 1 

Total... .412 




MILITARY ORGANIZATION, 
-—1900-1901. 



I 



Cadet 
Cadet 
Cadet 
Cadet 
Cadet 
Cadet 



1. 

o 



1. 

3. 
4. 



1. 
2. 



President. 
W. L. BROUN. 
Commandant. 
Col. B. S. PATRICK. 
Surgeon. 
J. H. DRAKE. 
Battalion Staff. 
Captain J. D. Foy, Assistant to Commandant. 
First Lieutenant J. B. Powell, Adjutant. 
First Lieutenant G. Whitfield, Quartermaster. 
First Lieutenant H. H. Conner, Assistant Adjutant. 
Sergeant W. D. Willis, Sergeant Major. 
Sergeant J. B. Garrer, Quartermaster Sergeant. 

Cadet Captains. 

S. H. Roberts. 3. M. S. Sloan. 

A. F. Jackson. 4. E. H. Wills. 

Cadet First Lieutenants. 

M. H. Moore, 5. & B. Meriwether, 

W. B. McUehee, 0. R. T< Arnold, 

W. L. Greene. 7. D. T. Parker, 

M. C. Turpin, '8. J.T.Letcher. 

Cadet Second Lieutenants. 
E. S. Killebrew, 3. W. H. Eagar. 

W. R. Lancaster. 



Cadet' First Sergeants. 

1. J. E. D. Yonge, . 3. J. D. Elliott, 

2. J. A. Kyser, 



1, 


G. W. 


Snedecor, 


2. 


C. A. 


Collins, 


3. 


w. c. 


Coles, 


4. 


R. B. 


Shepard, 


5. 


H. B. 


Park, 


6. 


D. W 


. Peabody, 


7. 


R. G. 


Dawson, 




(Color 


Sergeant.) 


8. 


J. D. 


Farley, 


9. 


F. J. 


Houston, 





4. 


W. 


M. Askew. 


Jad 


et Sergeants. 






10. 


M. 


Ketchum, 




11. 


M. 


Ellis, 




12. 


E. 


L. Carroll, 




13. 


M. 


J. Lide, 




14. 


J. 


0. Webb, 




15. 


T. 


M. McCarroll, 




16. 


W. 


B. Hamilton, 




17. 


C. 


E. Feagin, 




18. 


D. 


T. Herridon. 



207898 



40 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



Cadet Corporals. 



1. W. J. Knight, 

2. H. E. Davis, 

3. W. W. Davis, 

4. D. Chipley, 

5. H. M. Yonge, 

6. T. J. Dowdell, 

7. A. M. Avery, 

8. T. H. Matson, 

9. L. E. Thornton, 



10. P. M. Marshall, 

11. W. H. Wiley, 

12. W. W. Rutland, 

13. J. H. Mitchell, 

14. W. L. Thornton, 

15. F. E. Hunt, 

16. W. L. Halsey, 

17. E. Taylor. 



THE A. P. I. CADET BAND. 

M. Thos. Fullan, Bandmaster. 

L. Sternfeld, Principal Musician. 

A. M. Avery, W. L. Harwell, 

R. C. Armstrong, J. C. Harper, 

F. C. Atkinson, I. L. Jordan, 
N. A. Beringer, M. D. Kahn, 
*• B °yd, C. Lay, 

V. R. Emrick, g. N. Montgomery, 

M - EWs, A. B. Nelson, 

G. B. Foss, e. J. Pierce, 
A. R. Gray, g. Sequiera, 
M. Harwell, H. E. Werner, 

E. J. Carroll, Drum Major. 

Cadets of the graduating class who were reported to the Adjutant 
General, U. S. Army, for publication in the "Official Army Register" 
as having ranked highest in the Military Department: 



1889. 

A. St. Duns tan, 

B. H. Crenshaw, 
A J. Burr. 

1890. 

F. D. Milstead, 
J. W. Bivins, 

G. W. Emory. 

1891 
L. E. Baker, 

C. C. Johnson, 
F. J. Bivins. 

1892 
H. F. Dobbin, 
A. L. Jones, 
C. L. Brown. 

1893. 
Joel Dumas, 
C. H. Smith, 
J. F. Webb. 

1894. 
C. S. Andrews, 
P. P. McKeown, 
R. T. Dorsey. 



1895. 
S. L. Coleman, 
H. H. Smith, 
L. B. Gammon. 

' 1896. 
A. L. Alexander, 
W. L! Fleming, 
W. M. Williams. 

1897. 
P. G. Clark, 
G. M. Holley, 
G. N. Mitcham. 

1898. 
A. H. Clark, 
A. McB. Ransom, 
Jno. Haralson. 

1899. 
I. I. McDonnell, 
A. H. Feagin, 
T. W. Wert. 

1900. 
E. M. Mason, 
H. P. Powell, 
C. W. Nixon. 



_^_^___ 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



41 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

All applicants for admission should present testimo- 
nials of good moral character, and those who come from 
other colleges must present certificates of honorable 
discharge. 

To enter the freshman class the applicant must be 
not less than fifteen years of age, and should be qualified 
to pass a satisfactory examination on the following sub- 
jects: 

1. Geography and History of the United States, 

2. .English — (a) English grammar as contained in 
any standard text, (b) An examination upon sen- 
tences containing incorrect English, (c) A composi- 
tion giving evidence of satisfactory proficiency in spell- 
ing, punctuation, grammar, and division into para- 
graphs. 

(a) Reading. The composition in 1901 will be upon 
subjects drawn from one or more of the following works 
in English Literature: (1) Hughes's Tom Brown at 
Rugby; (2) Southey's Life of Nelson; (3) Shakes- 
peare's Julius Caesar; (4) Longfellow's Evangeline; 
( 5 ) Scott's Ivanhoe ; ( 6 ) Shakespeare's Merchant of 
Venice; (7) Irving s .Sketch Book; (8) Macaulay's 
Essay on Milton; (9) Scott's Marmion; (10) Dick- 
ens's David Copperfield. 

The candidate will be required to present evidence of 
a general knowledge of the subject matter, and to answer 
simple questions on the lives of the authors. This part 
of the examination is intended to test only a general 
knowledge of the substance of the books. 

(b) Study and Practice. This part of the examina- 
tion presupposes the'tlio&ugh study of the style of the 
work, and wall be upon Julius Cwsar and the Essay on 
Milton. 



42 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



Preparation and examination on these works will be 
necessary before the student is classed as regular in any 
course. 

3. Mathematics — (a) Arithmetic, including funda- 
mental operations; common and decimal fractions; de- 
nominate numbers; the metric system; percentage, in- 
cluding interest and discount; proportion, (b) Alge- 
bra, to quadratic equations; especial preparation is 
urged in fundamental operations, factoring, multiples, 
divisors and fractions; one book of geometry. 

4. Those applicants who desire to continue the study 
of Latin should be qualified to pass a satisfactory ex- 
amination in Latin grammar and- the first two books of 
Ca*sar, in addition to the above subjects. 

In pronouncing Latin it is recommended that a be pronounced as in 

^ - - ^ _ \j 

father, a as the a in Cuba; e as in prey t as in men; i as in machine, % 

*s in cigar ; o as in old, u as in obey; u as in rule, tlas in full; j as y in 
yard ; c always as k in king; g always as g in get. 

For admission to the higher classes, students should 
be prepared to stand a satisfactory examination in all 
of the studies of the lower classes, as shown in the course 
of study. Students applying for admission to the sopho- 
more class will be examined in mathematics through 
quadratic equations and logarithms in "Algebra, and on 
seven books in geometry. Where opportunity has not 
been offered to pursue special studies required at this 
College, the system of equivalents will be adopted, and 
studies which denote an equivalent amount of discipline 
and training will be accepted as satisfactory. But if not 
prepared to pass an examination in history and chemis- 
try at the time of application, the applicant will be re- 
squired before graduation to pass a satisfactory examina- 
tion on those subjects. ...,.•■. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



43 



It is absolutely essential that students, who hope to 
succeed, should be well grounded in Arithmetic, Algebra, 
.and Geometry. 

A working knowledge of the metric system should also 
be obtained. 

ADMISSION ON CERTIFICATE. 

Applicants will be admitted without examination on presenting a 
^certificate from any of the certificate schools named herein. 

The following educational institutions having made application to 
Tbe correlated to this College and having presented an approved 
-course of study, are hereby declared to be certificate schools, and 
.are granted the privilege set forth in the following: 

"Students from certificate schools will be admitted to the fresh- 
"man class ivithout examination upon the certificate of the presi- 
dent or principal showing definitely that such students have com- 
pleted satisfactorily all the studies required for admission, as 
"stated in the catalogue and are otherwise admissible." 

The privilege of admitting students to the Sophomore class on 
•certificate will be granted only to those approved schools that have 
.had a continuous existence for five years or more and have pre- 
viously had pupils admitted to that class without conditions. 

The following form of certificate will be used: 

I hereby certify that A , B. has attended the 

{name the school or academy) for years and has studied 

the following subjects: 

in History • • (name the books) 

in English (name the books) 

in Algebra (state amount accomplished) 

in Geometry (state amount accomplished) 

in Latin (state books read) 

and having passed a satisfactory examination on these subjects as 

Tequired in the Catalogue for admission to the class, 

I recommend him for the same. 

Admission by certificate is regarded as provisional. 

That is, though admitted to the class for which the certificate 
calls the applicant may be required to take a special examination 
in any subject in which his preparation proves unsatisfactory, or, 
after a fair trial, he may be dropped to a lower clasVifhe fails, to 
maintain standing in the class to which he may be admitted. 



*44 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

certificate schools. 

University Military School, Mobile......... J. D. Wright. 

Verner Military Institute, Tuscaloosa W. H. Verner. 

University School, Montgomery J. M. Starke. 

Mt. Willing High School, Mt. Willing J. Knight. 

State Normal School, Jacksonville C. W. Daugette. 

Male Academy, Huntsville F. Puryear. 

Furman Academy, Livingston L. A. Cockrell. 

High School, Opelika .J. M. Smallwood. 

University Military School, Clanton .E. Y. McMorries. 

Eighth District Agricultural School, Athens M. K. Clements. 

Sixth District Agricultural School, Hamilton. G. A. Holley. 

Eutaw Male Academy, Eutaw H. C. Horton. 

Boy's High School, Anniston H. C. Gunnels. 

Taylor's School, Birmingham , W. P. Taylor r 

University High School, Birmingham. . .1. J. White, M. B. Dickinson. 

Fourth District Agricultural School, Sylacauga A. G. Seay. 

Gaylesville High School . John R. Ray. 

Carrollton Academy ". , L. V. Rosser. 

Ninth District Agricultural School, Blountsville J. A. B. Lovett. 

Gadsden High School , . . . . . I. W. Hill. 

Boyd High School, Ramer B. H. Boyd. 

Dadeville High School , fTJ. D. Lane. 

Prattville High School . . . A. W. Holstun. 

Eufaula High School F. L. McCoy. 

Union sWngs High School J. M. Sanders. 

Montgomery High School. C. L. Floyd. 

Calera Academy .C. C. Slaton. 

Southern Agricultural School, Abbeville J. B. Murphy. 

Barnes's School, Montgomery E. R. Barnes. 

Jackson Agricultural School J. B. Murphy. 

Spring Lake School w. C. Griggs. 

West Alabama Agricultural School, Hamilton G. A. Holly. 

ADMISSION OF YOUNG WOMEN. 

The privilege of becoming students in this college is 
granted by the Trustees to young women of mature mind 
and character, on the following conditions : 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



45 



The applicant must be seventeen years of age, and if a 
candidate for a degree, be able to pass a satisfactory ex- 
amination in each of the four subjects as named below. 

If the applicant is a, candidate for admission as a 
special or irregular student, she must be able to pass a 
satisfactory examination in two of the subjects named, 
and may be admitted at an age less than seventeen, with 
a resident of Auburn acting as guardian, if application 
is approved by the Faculty. 

(a) In English— Proficiency in spelling and punctuation; Gram- 
mar ( Lock wood- Whitney ) ; Rhetoric (Lockwood's Lessons and Ge- 
nung's Outlines of Rhetoric) ; Scudder's Masterpieces of American 
Literature; Syle's From Milton to Tennyson. 

For requirements in reading in literature see page 41. 

(b) In History — Macy's Our Government; Chambers's History 
of the United States; Myers's General History. 

(c) In Mathematics — Arithmetic; Algebra, including quadratic 
'equations, logarithms arid series; Plane and Solid Geometry; Plane 

and Analytic Trigonometry, as in Wentworth. 

(d) In Latin— Grammar, including the forms and syntax; Jones's 
Latin Prose Composition; translation of selections from Cassar, 
Nepos, Virgil, Cicero's Orations, Cicero's Letters, or the equivalent. 

The equivalents of these subjects, as in above text-books, may be 
substituted. 

Botany will constitute a required part of the general course for 
young women who are candidates for a degree. 

When admitted, upon complying with the conditions above stated, 
they may enter upon the study of any subject taught in the College 
and join any class, for which, upon examination, they may be found 
qualified. The only condition imposed will be that they engage in 
earnest study, and attend the exercises regularly. They will board 
in the town with private families and attend college only at the 
hours of their exercises. 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS. 

Entrance examinations will be held on Wednesday, 
the 11th of September, the day on which the session 
opens. Candidates will also be examined during- the 
session, when application is made for admission. 






46 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 






Applicants who are not prepared to stand the entrance 
examinations for full admission to the freshman class 
are admitted to the sub-college department, provided 
tliey are fifteen years of age, and are found after exami- 
nation qualified to profit by the instruction given. Those 
who, after admission, are inattentive to their studies, 
and neglectful of their duties will be required to with- 
draw, but those who are studious and make sufficient 
progress will be advanced to full admission to the Fresh- 
man class when they are qualified to pass satisfactorily 
the required examinations. 

Students, upon their arrival at Auburn, will report immediately 
to the President. No student will be admitted to a recitation in any 
class previous to matriculation. 

NUMBER OF EXERCISES REQUIRED. 

All students are required to have not less than fifteen recitations, 
per week, or their equivalent, in addition to the exercises in labora- 
tory work, drawing and military drill. These additional exercises, 
occupy not less than twelve hours per week, and in all give twenty- 
seven to thirty hours per week required in college exercises. 



Special and Irregular Students. 

The privilege of electing studies in the lower classes; 
is not granted to young students nor to their parents. 

The Faculty will assign a student, on admission, to 
that class of a prescribed course for which he is qualified ;; 
and for special reasons, approved by the Faculty, he 
may be permitted to become irregular. 

Students qualified to prosecute the studies of the 
junior class, and those over twenty-one years of age that 
are not candidates, fop a degree, are permitted to take, 
with the advice of the Faculty, the, subjects of study for 
which they may. he/piajifiejl. . .. 



» i 



< :i 



t i 



• i >!.,>! 



'**J 




^______ 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



47 



For an applicant to enter upon the study of Electrical 
and Mechanical Engineering as a special or irregular 
student, he must have studied Algebra through quadrat- 
ics and logarithms, plane geometry, and plane trigonom- 
etry. 

The professor in charge of a department will decide 
by examination whether a special student is prepared 
for admission to his class. 

A student who does>not take all the studies in a class of one of 
the degrejp courses, as prescribed in the catalogue, and is permitted 
to take an irregular course, will be assigned to a member of the 
Faculty, who will act as his special adviser, and when his course of 
study has been approved by the Faculty no other change will be 
permitted without the endorsement of his adviser. 

Regular students who fail to pass satisfactory final examinations 
in any one study become irregular students. They will be classed 
as regular students pursuing a course for a degree, whenever they 
can pass the examinations in those subjects in which they were 
found deficient. 

Students, candidates for a degree, who are not in full standing 
in all the prescribed studies of a class, rank in the military depart- 
ment with that class in which they have the greatest number of 
studies, and their names are so placed in the catalogue. 

ADMISSION TO HIGHER CLASSES. 

At- the beginning of ejtch term a student in the sub-freshman class 
may, on application approved by the Faculty, be examined for ad- 
mission to the freshman class in history, english, mathematics, and 
be admitted to the freshman class in that subject only. 
. Students who have completed satisfactorily all the studies of the 
sophomore class, as prescribed in the catalogue, in any one of the 
regular degree courses, can enter, without conditj/on, the junior 
class in any course, except in the general course, oK.the course in 
pharmacy, in which Latin is required. 

Students who are adihitted to the junior class from othe^nstitu- 
tions, on examination in English, Latin, and mathematics, and\wJip 
have, not 'completed all. the studies ot the sophomore, class,. ( jn, order 
to .gra^uMe, will., he require^, to complete the course, in cheniis^v 
and history as taught in the sophomore class. 



\s 



48 









Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 
COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 



The courses of study include the Physical, Chemical, 
and Natural Sciences, with their applications; Agricul- 
ture; Biology; Mechanics, Astronomy, Mathematics; 
Drawing; Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical Engineer- 
ing; Physiology and Veterinary Science; Pharmacy; 
English, French, German, and Latin Languages; His- 
torv, Political Economy; Mental and Moral Sciences. 

These studies are arranged in regular courses so as to 
offer a liberal and practical education as a preparation 
for the active pursuits of life. 

There are five degree courses for undergraduates, each 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science, (B. Sc.) 
and requiring four years for its completion. 

I. Course in Chemistry and Agriculture. 
II. Course in Civil Engineering. 

III. Course in Electrical and Mechanical En- 
gineering. 

IV. General Course. 

V. Course in Pharmacy. 

There are also three partial courses, each requiring 
two years for its completion : 

VI. Two-Year Course in Agriculture. 

VII. Two-Year Course in Mechanic Arts. 

VIII. Two-Year Course in Pharmacy. 

Course 1. includes theoretical and practical instruc- 
tion in those branches that relate to chemistry and agri- 
culture, and is especially adapted to those who propose 
to devote themselves to agriculture or chemical pursuits. 

Course II. includes the principles and applications 
of the sciences that directly relate to civil engineering. 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 49 

and is adapted to those who expect to enter that profes- 
sion. 

Course III. includes, besides the general principles 
and applications of the sciences, a special course in the 
applications of electricity and mechanics, and is ar- 
ranged for the profession of electrical and mechanical 
engineering. 

Course IV. has been arranged to give a general and 
less technical education in subjects of science and lan- 
guage to meet the wants of those students who have 
selected no definite vocation in life, as well as of those 
who propose ultimately to engage in teaching or in some 
commercial or professional business. 

Course V.* includes, besides the general education of 
course IV. in the lower classes, a special course in phar- 
macy and chemistry, and is adapted to those who expect 
to become pharmacists, manufacturing chemists, or to 
enter upon the study of medicine. 

Courses VI. VII. VIII. have been arranged for the 
benefit of those students who, for reasons satisfactory 
to themselves, are unable to continue at college four 
years and to take one of the regular degree courses. 

A student who completes satisfactorily all the work of the senior 
class in a department, including the laboratory work, will be awarded 
a certificate of proficiency in said subject. 

Students who complete either of the two-year courses will, on 
passing a satisfactory examination, receive certificates indicating 
their attainments. 

No degree or certificate of proficiency will be given in any course 
unless the applicant has passed a satisfactory examination in ele- 
mentary English. Every candidate for a degree will be required 
to stand this special examination during the second term of the 
Senior year. 

Declamations and themes or orations are required of all regular 
students pursuing courses leading to a degree. 
4 






\ 



50 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 
POST-GRADUATE COURSES. 



A more extended post-graduate course of study may 
be taken by a, graduate of this College or of any other 
institution of equal grade. The completion of a course 
which leads to a post-graduate degree of Master of Sci- 
ence requires one year's residence at the College, spent 
in the satisfactory prosecution of a course of study, with 
such laboratory work as may be approved by the Faculty. 

The candidate must also present to the Faculty a satisfactory 
thesis showing independent investigation upon some subject per- 
taining to his course, and must pass an examination, at the close of 
each term, on the course of study prescribed, in which he must at- 
tain a grade of 75 per cent. The examination is written, and also 
oral in the presence of the Faculty. 

The subject of the thesis must be submitted to the Faculty for 
approval prior to January 1st, and the thesis given to the professor 
by May 1st. 

Applicants for a post-graduate degree and special students in post- 
senior studies are subject to the general regulations as other stu- 
dents, and pay the same fees, but are exempt from all military duty. 

The following courses are prescribed for the degree named : 

1. Master of Science.— Studies in three departments, in two of 
which the candidate must have previously completed the full course 
of the senior class; or in special cases, with the approval of the 
Faculty, a student may devote his full time to work in two de- 
partments, in each of which he has completed the full senior course. 

2. Master of Science in Pharmacy.— Pharmacy and Chemistry. 

3. Master of Science in Civil Engineering —Civil Engineering, 
Mathematics, Analytical Mechanics. 

4. Master of Science in Electrical and Mechanical Engineering. — 
Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering. 

5. Master of Science in Mining Engineering. — Students who have 
received the degree of B. Sc. in engineering, civil, or electrical and 
mechanical, or who have prosecuted an equivalent course of study, 
can enter upon a special course of mining engineering, which in- 
cludes the following subjects of study: 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



o. 



Industrial Chemistry, Analytic Chemistry, Assaying, Reduction of 
Ores, Mineralogy, Economic Geology, with practical work in the 
field, Mining Machinery with the applications of steam and elec- 
tricity to the various operations connected with the exploitation of 
mines. 

The student, if a candidate for a degree, will also be required to 
prosecute the necessary studies in that course of engineering in 
which he has not graduated. This course of study will be under the 
charge of the professors in the different engineering departments 
the professor of Chemistry, and the professor of Mineralogy and 
Geology. 

Special Students in Post-Senior Studies. — Students who are not 
graduates, but are qualified in special subjects to prosecute post- 
senior studies, and desire to prepare themselves more thoroughly 
for professional or special work in any one of the departments of en- 
gineering, in chemistry or pharmacy, veterinary science, or other 
subjects in which instruction is given, may, when qualified, with ap- 
proval of the Faculty, enter this higher department of study and 
have all the privileges of post-graduate students. 

A certificate of proficiency will be given when any one subject of 
a post-graduate course is satisfactorily completed. 

Two degrees will not he given the same year. 

PROFESSIONAL DEGREES. 

The professional degree of Civil Engineer, Electrical Engineer, 
Mechanical Engineer, Mining Engineer, or Pharmaceutical Chemist 
will be given two years after receiving the degree of Master of 
Science, provided the intervening time of two years has been spent 
in a- responsible position in practical engineering work in that de- 
partment in which he received the degree of Master of Science, or 
in practical pharmacy, and an approved thesis is submitted to the 
Faculty, with a report of the character of the work done. 

SPECIAL ONE-YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 

Young men over twenty-one years of age who desire to study agri- 
culture will be permitted, without examination, to enter any class 
under the professor of agriculture, and will be excused from rec tog 
in any other class, from military duty, and from al other co.leg 
duties; but will be under the genial college regulatxons, .and will 
be required to have their time fully occupied. 



52 Al ab ama Polytechnic Institute. 

They may attend the lectures in agriculture in all the classes and 
engage in the practical work at the experiment station, in the field, 
stock-yard, dairy, garden, orchard, vineyard, etc., and may thus, in 
one year, acquire valuable practical knowledge of scientific agricul- 
ture. 

PHOTOGRAPHY. 

During the session there will be given by Professor Mell a course 
of twelve lectures on photography. This course will be elective, and 
the instruction will be open to any student that may desire to learn 
how to make pictures. It will be necessary for each student to pro- 
vide himself with an outfit that will cost from $11.50 to $16.00. 

LABORATORY INSTRUCTION. 

Laboratory instruction constitutes an important 
feature in the courses of education provided for the stu- 
dents of this Institute, and as far as possible all students 
are required to enter upon laboratory work in some one 
department. ; 

Laboratory instruction and practical work are given 
in the following departments : 

I. Chemistry. 

II. Civil Engineering, Field Work, Surveying, 
Etc. 

III. Agriculture. 

IV. Botany. 

V. Mineralogy. 

VI. Biology. 

VII. Technical Drawing. 

VIII. Mechanic Arts, 

IX. . Physics. 

X. Electrical Engineering. 

XI. Mechanical Engineering. 

XII. Physiology and Veterinary Science. 

XIII. Pharmacy. 

NoTE.-Special work in English or History may be taken by in- 
dents in the general course as a substitute for laboratory work. 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



53 



I.— COURSE" IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Second Term. 
5. English. 
2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



First Term. 

:>. English. 
2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



TMrd Term. 
."). English. 
3. History. 
5. Mathematics. 

2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 



First Term. 
.*{. English. 
.'*. History. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 

2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 

2. Physiology. 



3. Military Drill. 

ttrxt Term. 
3. English. 
3. Physics. 



Third Term 
3. English. 
3. Botany (a). 
5. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 
:.\ Agriculture (b). 
3. Drawing. 
2. Physiology. 



3. Military Drill. 



3. Elementary Physics. 3. Elementary Physics. 
3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

(>. Mechanic Art Lab'y. <i. Mechanic Art Laby. 6. Mechanic Art Laby. 
3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3, Military Drill. 

';■•■•; SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Second Term. 
3. English. 
3. History. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 
:}. Agriculture. 
3. Drawing. 
.!. Physiology. 
Chemical Laboratory. 2. Chemical Laboratory. 2. Chemical Laboratory. 
6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. <>. Mechanic Art Lab'y. (>. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 
JUNIOR CLASS. 
Second Term. 
3. English. 
3. Phvsics. 

3. Industrial Chemistry. 3. Industrial Chemistry. 3. Industrial Chemistry. 
2. Agriculture. 2. Agriculture. 2. Agriculture (b). 

4. Botany. (Laboratory). 4. Botany. (Laboratory). 4. Botany (Laboratory). 

1. Military Tactics. 1. Military Tactics. 1. Military Tactics. 

9. Chemical Laboratory. 9. Chemical Laboratory. !>. Chemical Laboratory. 

2. Veterinary Science. 3, Veterinary Science. 2. Veterinary Science. 

:l. Clinical Laboratory. 3. Clinical Laboratory. 
3, Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. Third Term. 

:>. Political Economy (c). 3. Political Economy. 
3. Mental Scienc3 (d). 3. Mental Science (d). 

2. Astronomy. -• Astronomy. 

3. Geology. 2. Geology. 
5. Biology. •">• Biology. 

2, Agricultural ChemVy. 8. Agricultural ChemTy. 2. Agricultural ChemYy. 

1. Military Science. 1. Military Science. 1. Military Science. 

i>. Chemical Laboratory. 9. Chemical Laboratory. 9, Chemical Laboratory. 

2. Veterinary Science. :!. Veterinary Science. 2. Veterinary Science. 

3. Clinical Laboratory. 2. Clinicil Laboratory. 3. Clinicil Laboratory. 



Third Term. 
3. English. 
3. Physics. 



I 

» 



\ 



2. Clinical Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 

First Term, 
2. English Literature. 
2. Mental Science (d). 
2. Physics. 
2. Geology. 
5. Biology. 






.-'• 



(a) Begins March 1st. 
(c) Begins Feh. 15th. 



(b) Also Practical Agriculture. 

(d) French or German may be substituted. 



54 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



I[._CorRSE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours perwcek. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 



First Term. 

5. English. 

2. History. 

. r >. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 
3. Drawing 1 . 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 
3. English. 
3. History. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. (Jeneral Chemistry. 
2. Agriculture (b). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 

(>. Mechanic Art Lab'v 



Second Term. 
.*>. English. 
2, History. 
5. Mathematics. 



Third Term: 
.*>. English. 
3. History. 
5. Mathematics. 



3. Elementary Physics. 2. Agriculture. 



3. Drawing. 

fl Mechanic Art Lab'v. 

3. Military Drill. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Second Term. 

3. Englisli. 

3. History. 

.">. Mathematics. 

3. (Jeneral Chemistry. 

2. Agriculture (b). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 



3. Drawing. 

<). Mechanic Art Lab'v. 

« 

3. Military Drill, 

Third Term. 
3. English. 
3. Hotany (a). 
;>. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 
2. Agriculture (b). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 
5. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 



6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

2. Chemical Laboratory. 2. Chemical Laboratory. 2. Chemical Laboratory. 

3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 





First Term. 




3. 


English, French, or 
German. 


3. 


3. 


Physics. 


3. 


5. 


Mathematics. 


5. 


5. 


Civil Engineering. 


5, 


5. 


Drawing. 


5. 


1. 


Military Tactics. 


1. 


<i. 


Lab'y, Mech. Arts (c). 


11. 


1. 


Field Work, Engin'g. 


1. 


3. 


Military Drill. 


•> 



First Term 
2. English Literat'e (d). 
2. Physics. 

2. Geology. 

3. Mathematics. 



•» 
•» 
>i 

3. 



Second Term. 
English, French, or 

(Jerman. 
Physics 
Mathematics. 
Civil Engineering. 
Drawing. 
Military Tactics. 
Lab'y. Mech. Arts (c). 
Field Work. Engin'g. 
Military Drill. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

Serum d Term. 
Political Economy (d). 
Astronomy. 
Geology. 
Mathematics. 






Third Term. 
English, French, or 

(Jerman. 
Physics. 
Mathematics. 
Civil Engineering. 
Drawing. 
Military Tactics. 
Lab. Mech. Arts (c). 
Field Work, Engin'g. 
Military Drill. 

• . # 

Third Term. 
2. Political Economy (d)« 
2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 

3. Mathematics. 



;>. 

5. 

5. 

1. 

(i. 

i 

3. 



(a) Begins March 1st. 

(b) For Agriculture may be substituted «Physical Laboratory. 
(o) Or Mineralogy. 

(d) For Eng. Lit and Pol. Eccn. may be substituted. French or (Jerman. 




— __ 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



55 



5. Civil Engineering. 



:>. Civil Engineering. 



5. Civil Enginoering. 

5. Drawing;. &> Drawing. :>. Drawing. 

1. Military Science. 1. Military Science. 1. Military Science 

4* Mech. Eng., Laby.. 4. Mech. Eng.. Laby. 4. Mech. Eng.. Lab'y. 
Field Work, Engin'g. Field Work, Engin'g. Field Work, Engin'g. 

HI.— COURSE IN ELECTRICAL AND MECIIANI- 

CAL ENGINEERING. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 
In freshman and sophomore classes the same studies are prescribed 
as in Course II in Civil Engineering. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 
First Term, Second Term, Third Term. 

3 English, French, or 3. English. French, or 3. English, French, or 
German. German. German. 

3. Physics. 3. Physics. 3. Physics. 

5. Mathematics. 5. Mathematics. 5. Mathematics. 

4. Electrical Engin'g. 4. Electrical Engin'g. 4. Electrical Lngin g, 

3. Mech. Engineering. 3. Mech. Engineering. 3. Mech. Engineering. 

4. Mechanical Drawing. 4. Mechanical Drawing. 4. Mechanical Drawing. 
4. Electrical Lab'y. 4. Electrical Lab'y. 4. Electrical Laby. 

(J. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
1. Military Tactics. 
3. Military Drill. 

SENIOR CLASS. 
Second Term. 

^ V' t \ o Political Econo'v(a). 2. Political Eeono'y (a). 

Tl. Enff. Literature (a). 2. 1 oliticai r^uuu .> y<*, 

. o Aa+rrmrmiv 2. Astronomy. 

It. Physics. -• Astronomy. 

;>. Geology. 

3. Mathematics. 

5. Electrical Engin'g. 

5. Mech. Engineering. 

1. Military Science. 1. Military Science. 



6. Mech, Art Laby. 
1. Military Tactics. 
3. Military Drill. 

First Tkrm. 



2. Geology. 

3. Mathematics. 

X Electrical Engin'g. 
5. Mech. Engineering. 



ft. Mech. Art Lab'y. 
1. Military Tactics. 
3. Military Drill. 

Third Term. 



3. Geology. 

3. Mathematics. 

5. Electrical Engin'g. 

5. Mech. Engineering. 



4. Mech. Eng. Lab'y. 
1. Military Science. 



(;a) French or German may be substituted. 



56 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



IV.— GENERAL COURSE. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 



First Term, 
3. English. 

2. History. 

3. Latin. 

*>. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 

6, Mechanic Art Lab'y 

3. Military Drill. 



Second Tern}. 
3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

.">. Mathematics. 

I, Drawing. 

♦>. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 



Third Term. 
3. English. 
3. History. 
3. Latin. 
.*>. Mathematics. 
■i. Agriculture. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



3. 

3. 
3. 
<>. 

*+ • 

3. 



First Term, 
Latin. 
History. 
Mathematics. 
General Chemistry 
Drawing. 
Mechanic Art Lab'y 



Second Term. 
.">. Latin. 
3. History. 



Third Term. 
5. Latin. 
3. Hotany(a). 
5. Mathematics. 5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 3. General Chemistry. 
3. Drawing. . ; ;; 3. Drawing. 

<5. Mechanic Art Lab'y. <x Mechanic Art Lab'y 
Chemical Laboratory. r>. Chemical Laboratory. 2. Chemical Laboratory 
Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 



3. 
3. 
3. 
3. 
3. 
3. 
1. 
♦). 
3. 



First Term 
English. 
Physics. 
Mathematics 
French. 
German. 
Latin. 
Military Tactics. 



Second Term. 
3. English. 
3. Physics. 
3. Mathematics. 
3. French. 
3. German. 
3. Latin. 



Third Term. 
3* English. 
3. Physics. 
3.. Mathematics. 
3. French. 
3. German. 
3. Latin. 
I. Military Tactics. 



*• . 

o 
.» 
•> 

»• • 

3. 
3. 

1. 



1. Military Tactics. 

Laboratory Work (b). 0. Laboratory Work (b). <>. Labo7aVr7work (b) 

Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

SENIOR CLASS. 
Second Term. Third Term, 

■I. Political Economy (c). 3. Political Economy. 



First Term, 
English. 
Mental Science. 
Physics. 
Geology. 
French. 
German. 
Latin. 
Military Science 



2. Mental Science. 
2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 
1. Military Science. 



•> 



Mental Science. 
Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 

3. French. 
3. German. 
2. Latin. 

Military Science. 



Laboratory Work (b). (>. Laboratory Work (b). (>. Laboratory Work (b). 



(a) Hegins March 1st. 

(b) The student may elect the laboratory of any department for 
which he may be qualified. J uepartment tor 

(c) Begins February 15th. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



57 



V.— COURSE. IN PHARMACY. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per week. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 



Second Term. 
3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing 1 . J 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 
Second Term. 
5. Latin. 
3. History. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 
2. Physiology. 



Third Term. 

3, English. 
3. History. 
3. Latin. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Drawing. 
... Agriculture. 
0. Mechanic Arts. 
3. Military Drill. 

Third Term.. 
5. Latin. 
3. Hotany (a). 
5. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 
(5. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 



Flint Term. 
3. English. 

2. History. 

5. Latin. 

.*>. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



First Term, 
5, Latin. 
3. History. 

5, Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. (>. Mechanic Ar| Lab'y 

2. Chemical Laboratory. 2. Chemical Laboratory. 2, Chemical Laboratary 

3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 3. Military Drill. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Second Term, Third Term. 

3. Physics. 3. Physics. 

<). Chemical Laboratory. 0. Chemical Laboratory. <>. Chemical Laboratory. 

4. Botanical Laboratory. 4. Botanical Laboratory. 4. Botanical Laboratory 
3. English (b). 3. English (b). 3. English (b). 

3. Pharmacy. 3. Pharmacy. 3. Pharmacy. 

9. Pharmaceutical Lab 1 v. 9. Pharmaceutical Lab'y. 9. Pharmaceutical Lab'y 

4. Pharmacognosy. 4. Pharmacognosy. 4. Pharmacognosy. 
1. Military Tactics. 1. Military Tactics. 1. Military Tactics. 

3. Military Drill. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 
5. Biology. 

0. Chemical Labaratory. (>. Chemical Laboratory. 0. Toxicology. 
•">. Pharmacy. 5. Pharmacy. ">: Pharmacy. 

8. Pharmaceutical Lab'y. 8. Pharmac9iitical Lab'y. 8. Pharmaceutical Lab'y. 
5. Pharmacognosy. 5. Pharmacognosy. 5. Pharmacognosy. 

2. Military Science. 1. Military Science. 1. Military Science. 

3. Materia Medica. 3 Materia Medica. 3. Bacteriology. 

(a) Begins March 1st. 

(b) French or German may be substituted. 



^ 



First Term, 
2. Physics. 



3. Military Drill. 
First Term, 



.». 



Biology. 



3. Military Drill. 

Third Term. 
3. Biology. 



58 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 
VI— TWO-YEAR COURSE IN MECHANIC ARTS 



s. 



.>. 

3. 

3. 

(>. 



3. 

12 
3. 



ftrsi 7Vrm. 

English. 

History. 
Mathematics. 

Elementary Physics. 

Drawing. 

Mechanic Art Laby. 
Military Drill. 

First Term. 

English. 

Mathematics. 

Physics. 

Drawing. 

, Mechanic Art Lab'y 

Military Drill. 



.>. 
•> 

3. 
3. 
<». 

3. 



3. 
5. 
3. 

3. 
VI 
3. 



FIRST YEAR. 
Second Term. 

English. 

History. 

Mathematics. 

Elementary Physics. 

Drawing. 

Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

Military Drill. 

SECOND YEAR. . 
Second Term. 

English. 
Mathematics 
Physics. 
Drawing. 

. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

5. English. 
2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 

2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 

(i. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
8. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

3. English. 

5. Mathematics. 

3, Physics. 

3. Drawing. 

12. Mechanic Art Lab'y 

3. Military Drill. 



VH._TWO-YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 



First Term. 

T>. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 

3. Drawing. 

4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

2. Practical Agricult're. 



First Term. 

"1. English. 

r>. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

4. Agriculture. 
2. Physiology. 
2. Veterinary Science. 
12. Practical Agricultre 
.3. Military Drill. 



FIRST YEAR. 

Second Term. 

:>. English. 

2. History. 
5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 

3. Drawing. 

4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

2. Practical Agricult're. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Second Term. 

3. English. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

4. Agriculture. 
2. Physiology. 

2. Veterinary Science 
12. Practical Agricult're, 

3. Military Drill. 



•) 

5. 
o 

•* • 

3. 

4. 

3. 
»> 



Third Term. 

English. 

History. 

Mathematics. 

Agriculture. 

Drawing. 

Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

Military Drill. 

Practical Agricult're. 



3. 
5. 
3. 
4. 

»* • 

>* * 

12 
3. 



Third Term. 

English. 
Mathematics. 
General Chemistry. 
Agriculture. 
Physiology. 
Veterinary Science. 
. Practical Agricult're 
Military Drill. 



^m 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



59 





VIII.— TW(V 


i r E 


SAB COURSE IIS 

FIRST YEAR. 


r I 


'HARMAUY. 




First Term. 




Second Term. 




Third Term. 


3, 


General Chemistry. 


3. 


General Chemistry. 


3. 


General Chemistry. 


•> 


Chemical Lab'y. 


«) 


Chemical Lab'y. 


2 


Chemical Lab'y. 


3. 


English. 


3. 


English. 


3. 


Hotany. 


'> 


Physiology. 


o 


Physiology. 




Physiology. 


& 


Pharmacy. 


3. 


Pharmacy. 


3. 


Pharmacy. 


4. 


Pharmacognosy. 


4. 


Pharmacognosy. 


4. 


Pharmacognosy. 


0. 


Mech. Art Lab'y. (a) 


ft. 


Mech. Art Lab'y. (a) 


<>. 


Mech. Art Lab'y. (a) 


3. 


Military Drill. 


3. 


Military Drill. 
SECOND YEAR. 


3. 


Military Drill. 




First Term. 




Sectmd Term. 




Third Term. , 


5. 


Pharmacy. 


5. 


Pharmacy. 


5. 


Pharmacy. 


5. 


Pharmacognosy. 


5. 


Pharmacognosy. 


."). 


Pharmacognosy. 


.8. 


Pharmaceutical Lab. 


8. 


Pharmaceutical Lab. 


8. 


Pharmaceutical Lab. 


<). 


Chemical Lab'y. 


<i. 


Chemical Lab'y. 




Toxicology. 


3. 


Materia Medica. 


3. 


Materia Medica. 


3. 


Bacteriology. 


<i. 


Botanical Lab'y. 


0. 


Botanical Lab'y. 


(). 


Botanical Lab'y. 


X. 


Military Drill. 


3. 


Military Drill. 


3. 


Military Drill. 



(a) or Physical Laboratory 



__^M^^^ 







SCHEDULE OF 


EXERCISES. 


- 




o 


HOUBfi 


MONDAY 


TUESDAY 


WEDNESDAY 


THURSDAY 


FRIDAY 


SATl'IU) AY 






;3. Agriculture. 








►*w 


1. 


4. Algebra. |4. Geometry. 


4. Algebra. 


4. Geometry. 4. Algebra. 








3. Latin. :*. Latin. 


3. Latin. 


3. Latin. 3. Latin. 




> 


8-0 


.2. German. 




2. German. 


Exercises in Elocution. 


► ,_ 




1 and 2 Drawing. 1 1 and 3 Drawing. 


1 and 2 Drawing. 


1 and 2 Drawing. 1 and 2 Drawing. 








1 . Elec. Engine'r'g 2. Botany. 


1. Vet. Science. 


2. Botany. 1. Veterinary Sci. 




Ml 

> 




2. Mec. Engine'r'g 1. Elec. Engine'r'g 1. :iec.U igine'r'g 


1. Mental Science. 1. Elec. Engine'r'g 


\r 




1. Biology. 


1. Mental Science. 'l. German. 


1. Elec. Engine'r'g 1. German. 


o 
r 1 




1. German. 


|2. Mech'l Eng. 


2. Mech'l Eng. 




|4/ English. 


4. History. 


4. English. 


4. History. 


4. English. 




H 


II. 


3. Chemistry. 


3. Physiology. 


3. Chemistry. 


3. Agriculture. 


3. Chemistry. 


Military Drill. 


Hi 




2. Civ. Engineer'g. 


2. Civ. Engine'r'g. 


2. Civ. Engineer'g. 


2. Civ. Engine'r'g. 


2. Civ. Engine'r'g. 




WO 


2. Latin. 


2. Botany. 


2. Latin. 


2. Botany. 


2. Latin. 






1. Calculus. 


2. Elec. Engine'r'g 


1. Calculus. 


2. Elec. Engine'r'g 


2. Mech'l Drawing 




o 




1. Biology. 


1. Chemistry. 


2. V§jt. Science. 


1. Chemistry. 


1. Calculus. 




H 


1 


2. Elec. Engine'r'g 1. French. 


2. Elec. Engine'r'g 1. French. 


2. Vet. Science. 








1. Machine Desi'g. 




1. Machine Desi'g. 






H 


III. 


3. English. 


3. History (1. 2). 


3. English. 


3. History (1, 2). 


3. English. 


Mechanic Arts. 






2. Physics. 


3. Botany (2, 3). 




3. Botany (2, 3). 2. Physics. * 


Chemical Laboratory. 


H 






1 . Biology. 


2. Physics. 


1. Civ. Engin'r'g. 




Electrical Laboratory. 




10-1 1 


1. Civ. Engine rg. 


1. Civ. Engineer'g 


1. Latin. 


4. English. 


1. Civ. Engineer'g. 


Physical Laboratory. 






1. Biology. 


4. English. 


1. Civ. Engineer'g 


1. Mech. Engin'r'g 




Veterinary Clinics. 






1. Latin. 


1. Mec. Engine'r'g 


1. Biology. 


2. French. * 


4. History (3). 


Biological Laboratory. 






1. Mec. Engine r'g 


2. French. 


1. Mech. Fnjin'r'g 




1. Mech. Engin'r'g 


Field Engineering. 




t- 


|2. jMec. Drawing. 













SCHEDULE OF EXERCISES— Continued . 



HOURS 


MONDAY 


tuksday 


WEDNESDAY 


THURSDAY 


F HID AY 

• 


SATURDAY 




4. Physics (1, 2;. 


4. Latin. 


4. Physics (1, 2). 








IV. 




3. Drawin?. 


4. Latin (3). 

3. History (1, 2). 


4. Latin. 


4. Physics (1, 2). 






4. Agricultnre (3). 


2. Agriculture. 


3. Botany (2, 3.) 


2. Agriculture. 


4. Agriculture( 3). 




11-12 


4. Latin (1. 2). 


2. Mathematics. 


.'. Mathematics. 


2. Mathematics. 


4. Latin (1. 2). 3. Mechanic Arts. 




3. Drawing. 


i. Chemistry. 


2. Chemistry. 


1. Chemistry. 


3. Drawing. jChemical Laboratory. 




2. Mathematics. 


1. -French. 


1. English (1, 2). 


3. Physiology. 


2. Mathematics. 


Electrical Laboratory. 




2. Chemistry. 


1. Physics. 


1 . Political Econ- 


1. French. 


2. Chemistry. 


Physical Laboratory. 




1. English (1. 2 . 




omy (2. 3*. 


1. Phvsic3. 


j Veterinary Clinics. 




1. Pol. Econ.(2,3). 


1 


4. Mechanic Arts. 




1. MilitaryScience Biological Laboratory. 




4. Mechanic Arts. 


: 






4. Mechanic Arts J Field Engineering. 




4. Drawing. 


3. Mathematics. 


4. Drawing. 




4. Drawing. 




V. 


3. Mathematics. 


2. English. 


3. Mathematics. 


3. Mathematics. 


3. Mathematics. 


3. Mechanic Arts. 




2. English. 


1. Geology. 




2. English. 




Chemical Laboratory. 




4. Mechanic Arts. 




L Mechanic Arts. 


1. Geology. 


4. Mechanic Arts. 


Electrical Laboratory. 


12-1 


1. Elec. Designi'g. 








1. Elec. Designing. 


Physical Laboratory. 




1. French. 




1. German. 

1. Elec. Designing 

2. Anal. Chemis'ty 


• 


2. Military Tactics 


Veterinary Clinics. 
Biological j Laboratory. 
F*ield Engineering. 


P.M. 


'4. Mechanic Arts. 


3. Mechanic Art3. 
2. Mineralogical 


4. Mechanic Arts. 


3. Mechanic Arts. 
2. Mineralogical 


4. Mechanic Arts. 




VI .VII 


3. Field Work Agr. 
1 & 2 Laboratory. 


Laboratory. 


3. Field Work Agr. 
1 *fe 2 Laboratory. 


Laboratory. 


3. Field WorkAgr. 
2. French. 




2-4 


Chemistry. 


Military Drill (*j. 


Chem. 


Military Drill v *) 


1 & 2 Lab. Chem. 






1 & 2 Field Work, 




1 & 2 Field Work, 




1 & 2 Field Work. 






Engineering. 


1. Mech. Lab'tory. 


Engineering. 


1. Mech. Labor'y. 


Engineering. 






1 & 2 Mach. Work. 


Elec. Lab'y Work. 


1 & 2 Mach. Work. 


Elec. Lab'y Work. 


1 & 2 Mach. W r ork. 






lElec. Lab. Work. 


1 and 2 History. 


Ex"cis. in Elocut'n 


1 and 2 History. 


Ex'cis. in Elocut'n 


. 




Physical Labor'y. 


' 


Elec. Lab. Work. 
Physical Labor'y. 




Elec. Lab. Work. 
Physical Labor'y. 





Chapel services daily at 7:45 a. m. 

Numbers prefixed denote classes — 1 denotes senior. 2 junior, etc. Numbers affixed— ' v 1 ). (2). (3), denote terms. 

♦From 4:30 to 5:30 p. m. 



> 

> 
> 

> 

o 
* 









o 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION. 



PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY. 

PROFESSOR DUXSTAX. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR KYSER. 
ASSISTANT JEPSON. 

The instruction is given by the recitation from text 
books and lectures, illustrated by experiments and fctere- 
opticon projections. 

The following courses are given in this department : 

Fkesiimax Course. 

First and Second Terms. (Three recitations per week). Ele- 
mentary general physics. 

Text-Book. 
Cooley's Physics. 
Sophomore Laboratory Course. 
This is a laboratory course to follow the Freshman Course in 
general physics, and is designed, principally, for students who 
intend following engineering courses. 

First Term. (Six hoars per week.) (a) Simple measurements 
and design of measuring instruments, (b) Elementary graphi- 
cal statics, (c) Forces, moments and work. (d) Simple 
machines and friction (determining mechanical advantages, 
loss, efficiency, law, etc). 
Second Term. (Six hours per week,) (e) Pendulum and gravity. 
(■/) Elasticity, {g) Liquids, (h) Density and specific gravity. 
Third Term. (Six hours per week.) (i) Gases. (;) Heat, (k) 
Sound, (I) Light. 

Record-Book. 
About 100 experiments are selected and are quantitative in na- 
ture. Results of experiments are to be entered, in tabular form, 
together with diagrams, deductions, etc., in a laboratory record 
book which contains a synopsis of the experiment and deductive 
questions. At the close of each week this book is criticised and 
graded according to Us accuracy and neatness. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



63 



Reference-Books. 
Ames & Bliss' Laboratory Manual, Stewart & Gee's Practical Phys- 
ics, Nichol's Laboratory Manual, Magnus' Mechanics, Glazebrook's 
Mechanics and Statics. 

Junior Course. 
This is a more advanced course in general physics required of 
all candidates for a degree. 

First Term. (Three recitations per week.) Mechanics of solids, 

liquids and gases. 
Second Term. (Three recitations per week.) Static and dynamic 

electricity and magnetism. 
Third Term. (Three recitations per week.) Sound and heat. 

Text-Book. 
Ames' Theory of Physics. 
Senior Course. 
First Term. (Two recitations per week.) Light and optical in- 
struments. 
Second and Third Terms. (Two recitations per week.) Astronomy. 

Text-Books. 
Ames' Theory of Physics, Young's Astronomy. 
Post-Graduate Course. 
Instruction will be given in either analytical mechanics, or se- 
lected portions of mathematical physics. 

Prerequisite-Differential and integral caluculus. The depart- 
ment is well equipped with apparatus tor illustrating the lectures. 



MATHEMATICS. 

PllOFESSOR SMITH. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR CRENSHAW. 
INSTRUCTOR PATRICK. 

The subjects taught in the different classes in this 
department are as follows: 

Freshman Class. Algebra through quadratic eqa- 
tions and series, geometry (seven books Weatworfh), 
original solutions of exercises. 









«4 



Alabama POLYTECHNIC Institute. 



Sopiiomoub Class. Algebra completed, solid geom- 
etry, plane and spherical trigonometry, surveying, men- 
suration. 

Junior Class, Analyticial geometry, descriptive^ 
.geometry. 

Senior Class. Differential ami integral calculus. 

Two objects are sought to be attained : First, mental 
discipline; second, a thorough knowledge of the princi- 
ples of pure mathematics and their practical applica- 
tions. 

Theoretical and practical instruction is given to the 
sophomore class in farm, town and government land 
surveying, dividing land, mapping, plotting and com- 
puting areas, etc.; also in the theory, adjustment and 
use of instruments. 

The class, in sections of six or eight, devote three 
afternoons a week during the second and third terms 
to field practice. 

Mensuration includes an extended course in measure- 
ments of heights and distances, plane, rectilinear, and 
curvilinear figures, surfaces and volumes. 

The completion of this course, common to all stu- 
dents, lays the foundation for the pure and applied 
mathematics of the mechanical and engineering courses. 
Analytical geometry, descriptive geometry, and calculus 
are pursued in the engineering courses. Especial atten- 
tion is given to their practical applications. 

During the entire course, instruction in text-books 
is supplemented by lectures. Solutions of original prac- 
tical problems are required of the student, to make him 
familiar with the application of the principles and for- 
mulas. 









BOTANICAL LABORATORY. 



.■.■■.".■■'-•■■, 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



61 



Text-Books. 
Went worth's Algebra, Wentworth's Geometry, Wentworth's Trig- 
onometry, Davie's Surveying, Wentworth's Analytical Geometry. 
Faunce's Descriptive Geometry, Taylor's Calculus, Johnson's Dif- 
ferential Equations, Osborne's Problems, Peck's Determinants. 






GEOLOGY AND BOTANY. 

PROFESSOR MELL. 

Geology. — This subject is studied in the senior class, 
and extends through the entire session. Special atten- 
tion is given to the geology of Alabama, and many illus- 
trations are drawn from the coal and iron fields and 
other natural deposits of minerals in the State. Mineral 
springs, the origin of ore deposits, and the. geological 
relations of soils are carefully studied. 

There is also a course of advanced work in practical 
geology for post-graduate students. This subjed is 
pursued by applicants for the degrees of master of sci- 
ence and mining engineer. 

The junior class in civil engineering studies miner- 
alogy through the entire season. This work consists of 
a thorough course in blow-pipe analysis of the ordinary 
minerals, and lectures upon crystallography, with in- 
struction how to measure crystals and determine the 
physical constants of minerals. An effort is made to 
familiarize the student with all the economic ores and 
the rocks entering into the composition of sods. 

Botany.— The students of the sophomore class begin 
the study of botany the first of March, and continue it 
through the remainder of the session. Careful experi- 
ments are conducted in the lecture room explaining the 
formation and germination of seed, the growth into the 

5 






a 



Til— 



66 



ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE. 



mature plant, and the various functions performed by 
the plant in its development. Each student is required 
to keep careful notes illustrated with drawings of the 
various organs of the plant under examination. A lim- 
ited amount of work is done in classification and nomen- 
clature. 

In the junior class, in the course of chemistry and 
agriculture, two terms are devoted to systematic and 
structural botany, and to advanced laboratory work 
With the microscope in the preparations of specimens- 
showing plant structure; this work is sufficient to fa- 
miliarize the students with the methods of plant build- 
ing and cellular organization. Excellent microscopes, 
of the most improved patterns, and all necessary chem- 
icals and apparatus for preparing and mounting vege- 
table tissues, are used by the students. 

The third term is devoted to the study of the physiol- 
ogy of plants in order to understand the functions of 
the various organs after completion of the work in the 
histological laboratory. 

FACILITIES FOR WORK. 

. Geology. -The department is equipped with models of Mount 
Shasta, the earthquake of 1887 in Japan, glass crystals of teaching, 
crystallography; charts and maps of the geology of America and 
Europe; Colt's lantern complete with oil, oxy-hydrogen and auto- 
matic electric lamp?; a large assortment of fine lantern slides rep^ 
resenting geological formations in this country and abroad; welF 
equipped mineralogical laboratory for thirty students, supplied with 
a collection of representative minerals; and models of crystals. 

Botany. — The facilities for teaching this subject are as follows: 
Auzoux's clastic models of seeds and flowers; a large collection of 
pressed plants of Alabama and other sections mounted and cata- 
logued. There is also a laboratory for practical work in botany 
equipped with slate-topped tables for twenty students; dissecting 
and compound microscopes of Zeiss, Leitz, and Bausch & Lomb; pro- 
jection microscopic apparatus; microtomes by King and Bausch 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



67 



& Lomb; all the necessary glassware and smaller dissecting instru- 
ments required in a well equipped laboratory. The Zeiss com- 
pound microscope used by the professor for experiment work in 
connection with the station is supplied with Abbe's illuminating 
apparatus, slide changers, Abbe's camera lucida, polarizers, apo- 
chromatic objectives (16mm, S mm, 4mm, and homogeneous immer- 
sion), oculars (2, 3, 8, 12, 18), and photographic eye-piece with 
micrometer. This laboratory is well lighted with gas and electricity 
and with a good exposure for ample sunlight. 

In connection with the department there is a photographic dark- 
room and an excellent photographic outfit, consisting of cameras 
varying in size from 4x5 to &&*8% inches; Bausch & Lomb's pro- 
fessional photo-micro camera extending to eight l'eet; Zeiss's ana- 
stigmat photographic lens, 6^X8%, fitted with Bausch & Lomb's 
diaphragm shutter and Zeiss's wide angle lens, 6%x$&, all mounted 
in aluminum; Clark's lens fitted with diaphragm shutter; Darlot 
lens, 4x5; the accessory apparatus and chemicals required for first- 
class work in photography. 

The students have access to the botanical garden where experi- 
ments in grass culture and many other plants of interest to the 
farmer are conducted by the professor. 

Text-Books. 
LeConte's Geology, Tarr's Economic Geology, Dana's Mineralogy, 
Crosby's Tables for Determining Minerals, Bergen's Botany, Mell's 
Laboratory Guide, and notes of lectures. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING AND DRAWING. 

PROFESSOR LANE. 

ASSISTANT MARTIN. 

The special studies in this department begin in the 
junior class, and require a good knowledge of algebra, 
geometry, trigonometry, and analytical mechanics. Iney 

are as follows : 5 

Junior Class-Simple, compound, reversed and para- 
bolical curves, turnouts and crossings, leveling, gradi- 
ents, setting slope stakes, etc. 






C8 Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 

Special attention will be paid in this class to the loca- 
tion, construction, drainage and maintenance of coun- 
try roads; and the various pavements and foundations 

for the same. 

Senior Class— Classification, appearances, defects, 
seasoning, durability and preservation of timber; classi- 
fication and description of natural building stones; 
bricks and concretes; cast and wrought iron, steel and 
other metals; limes, cements, mortars and their manu- 
facture; paints and other preservatives; classification 
of strains and a general mathematical discussion of same ; 
joints and fastenings; solid and open built beams; classi- 
fication, construction and mechanics of masonry; foun- 
dations on land and in water ; bridges and roofs of differ- 
ent kinds, their construction and strains determined 
mathematically and graphically; common roads, their 
coverings, and location, and construction of railroads; 
navigable, irrigation and drainage canals; river and sea- 
coast improvements. 

Theory and practice are combined in both classes. 

Text-Books. 

Junior Class — Henck's Field Book for Railway Engineers and 
Byrne's Highway Construction. 

Senior Class— Wheeler's Civil Engineering and Von Ott's Graphic 
Statics. 

DRAWING. 

All of the students of the freshman and sophomore 
classes are required to take drawing; but only the stu- 
dents in civil engineering in the junior and senior 
classes. 

The freshman class is taught linear and free-hand 
drawing. The sophomore class is instructed in the prin- 
ciples of orthographic and isometric projections, shades, 
shadows, prospective and tinting. In the junior class 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



69 



the instruction embraces a more extended course in 
orthographic and isometric drawing, perspective, shades 
and tinting; also sketches of tools and machines, plans 
and elevations and cross-sections of buildings, and blue- 
prints. The senior class makes topographical draw- 
ings and drawings of machines, roofs, bridges, etc., to 
different scales, and blue prints. Plans, profiles and sec- 
tions of railroad surveys complete the instruction in this 
department. 

Text-Books. 

* 

Freshman Class.— Kitchener's Geometrical Note Book, Thome's 
Junior Course in Mechanical Drawing, and Davidson's Model Draw- 
ing. 

Sophomore Class.— Davidson's Projections, Davidson's Practical 
Perspective, Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. 

Junior Class.— Davidson's Building Construction, Davidson's 
Drawing for Mechanics and Engineers, plates belonging to the col- 
lege, Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet 

Senior Class— French, English and American plates belonging to 
the College, Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. 



ENGLISH AND POLITICAL ECONOMY. 

PROFESSOR THACH. 
PROFESSOR WIATT. 

ASSISTANT SCROCGS. 
ASSISTANT HAROLD. 

OBJECTS AND METHODS. 

In this department the students pursue a systematic 
course in the English language and literature. 

Language is the avenue of approach to all knowledge ; 
the interpretation of words is the fundamental process 
in education of whatsoever kind. A full course ,n Eng- 



I 



70 Alabama Polytkciixic Institute. 

lish is, therefore, considered especially important in 
the technical courses of study that do not include the an- 
cient classics. Accordingly, the course of, English is 
continued throughout the four years of the college cur- 
riculum, three hours a week, and is made obligatory 
upon all students, with the exception of those pursuing 
the first two rears of the course in Latin. In this ex- 
tended drill in the grammar and literature of the Eng- 
lish language, the endeavor is made to afford a train- 
ing somewhat equivalent to the ordinary course in the 
classical languages. 

In view of the ill preparation in languages, especially in their 
mother tongue, exhibited by many of the candidates for admission 
to the freshman class, it is deemed advisable, for the sake of honest 
work, to devote a portion of the first year to grounding such stu- 
dents in the principles of grammar. 

Especial attention is given to the study of the writings (them- 
selves of leading English authors, since direct contact with litera- 
ture is considered more profitable than information merely about 
literature. 

All students before classed as regular in any course leading to 
a degree must conform to all the requirements in English for ad- 
mission as set forth on page 41. 

For requirements as to thesis and as -to proficiency in English 
for certificates and degrees see pages 49 and 109. 

Declamation and themes (or orations) are required of all regular 
students. For details see below. 

COURSES OP STUDY. 

Freshman Class — Five hours a week; study of grammar, the 
principles of special and general composition, with frequent brief 
papers illustrating >ihe laws studied; study of American authors; 
Irving/Hawthorne, Holmes, Poe, Bryant, Longfellow. 

Swinton's English Grammar, Lockwood's Rhetoric, Kellogg & 
Reed's English Language. 

Sophomore Class. — Three hours a week; study of style, analysis 
of selections of prose and poetry; frequent essays on historic and 
literary themes. 




rVLAiiAMA Polytechnic Institute. 



71 



iG. R. Carpenter'^ Rhetoric, Genung's Rhetorical Analysis, Syle's 
From Milton to Tennyson. 

Junior Class. — TJiree hours a week; lectures on the history of 
English literature, critical study of English classics, essays. 

Pancoast's History of English Literature; Pancoast's Standard 
English Poems, Macaulay, Carlyle, DeQuincey, etc. 

Senior Class. — Two hours a week, first term. Principles of Criti- 
cism, Shakepeare's Julius Caesar, Hamlet, etc., Dowden's Shakes- 
peare, etc. 

THEMES AND ORATIONS. 

Theory without practice is as fruitless in the study of English 
.as in any other department of study. Practical work is indispen- 
sable to the successful teaching of English. 

.Besides numerous brief papers illustrative of the subject matter 
of the text-books, set themes or orations are required of all stu- 
dents:— For the freshman class, ten themes a year; ten for the 
sophomore; for tire senior and junior classes, three orations each. 

DECLAMATION. 

The old practice of committing pieces to memory for "speaking" 
is cultivated as a means, both of training in the art of thinking 
on the feet, and of storing the mind with the diction of finished 
specimens of Englisli style. 

The sophomore class is heard weekly throughout the year in 
sections of ten, once for an hour and a half in rehearsal, afterwards 
iin the study-hall before the body of students. 

The senior and junior classes also deliver their orations in public. 

PHILOSOPHY AND POLITICAL ECONOMY. 

The senior elass pursues the study of intellectual 
science, twice a week, through the year; and political 
economy twice a week, during the last two terms, l ne 
instruction in this department is by lectures in combi- 
nation with text-hooks. 

intellectual Science.-Psychology defined. Value in relation to 
moral culture, education and Natural Sciences. The relation ot 
the soul to matter. The arguments of the Materialist. Counter 
arguments. The Faculties of tie Soul. The nature of Consciounes. 
Sense Perception. Fancy. Imagination. Nature of Conceptions. 



-■ I 



72 



Alabama POLYTECHNIC Institute. 



Language. Judgment. Reasoning. Deduction. Induction, etc. 
Porter's Intellectual Science. 

Political Economy. — Value; production of wealth; land; labor; 
capital; division of labor; distribution of wealth; wages; trades- 
union; tariff; education, etc. Lectures by Professor. Ely's Outlines 

itf Economics. 

A Post-graduate course has also been established in English. The 

following courses have been given: 

(1) Shakespeare— Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, Merchant of Venice, 
As You Like It, Henry IV., Part I., Richard III., King John. 

(2) Dryden— Poetical Works (Christie); Essay of Dramatic 
Poesy (Thomas Arnold); Essay on Satire, etc., (Yonge) ; Salis- 
bury's Life of Dryden. 

Pope— Poetical Works (Ward); Satires (Pattison); Stephen's 

Life of Pope, Gosse's From Shakespeare to Pope and 18th Century 
of Economics. 

(3) English Literature of the Eighteenth Century; Addison, 
Pope, Gray, Goldsmith, Burns, Cowper, Burke. 

(4) American Literature: Longfellow, Lowell, Poe. 

(5) The Rise and Development of the English Essay: Bacon, 
Addison, Steele, Swift, Johnson, Goldsmith, Macaulay, DeQuincey, 
Lamb, Carlyle. 



CHEMISTRY. 

ACTING PROFESSOR MURRILL. 

INSTRUCTOR HARE. 
INSTRUCTOR HOUGHTON. 

Instruction in this department embraces — 

1. A course of lectures in general chemistry. 

2. A course of lectures in industrial chemistry. 

3. A course of lectures in metallurgy. 

4. A course of lectures in agricultural chemistry. 

5. Systematic laboratory work in connection with 
each course of lectures, for the practice of chemical 
analysis and chemical research. 

1. Course in general chemistry: This consists of a 



r- 




^p*^p- 




CHEMICAL LABORATORY (INTERIOR,) 



■ 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



7a 



series of lectures (three per week ) extending throughout 
the entire session, and includes a discussion of the fun- 
damental principles of chemical philosophy in connec- 
tion with the history, preparation, properties and com- 
pounds of the metallic and non-metallic elements, with 
the main facts and principles of organic chemistry. In 
this course the more common applications of chemistry 
to the arts and manufactures are discussed. The appa- 
ratus used for experimental illustration is extensive, 
containing the newest and approved improvements nec- 
essary for presenting the subject in the most attractive 
and instructive form. 



REFERENCE BOOKS. 



Roscoe & Schorlemmer, Fownes, Frankland, Remsen, Cooke's. 
Chemical Philosophy, Chemical Journals. 

i. Lectures in industrial chemistry (three per week) 
extend throughtout the session, and include a discussion 
in detail of the processes and chemical principles in- 
volved in the most important applications of chemistry 
in the arts and manufactures to the preparation of ma- 
terials for food and drink, for clothing, shelter, illumi- 
nation, cleansing, purifying, writing, printing, etc. 

These lectures are amply illustrated by means of suit- 
able specimens of raw materials and manufactured pro- 
ducts, together with models and diagrams. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Wagner's Chemical Technology, Muspratt's Chemistry as applied 
to Arts and Manufacturing, Ure's Dictionary, Watt's Dictionary, 
Richardson and Watt's Chemical Technology, Percy's Metallurgy,. 
Sadtler's Industrial Organic Chemistry. 

3. Course in metallurgy : This consists of lectures 
and recitations (two per week, during first term) upon 
the more important metals, such as iron and steel, cop- 
per, lead, tin, silver, mercury, zinc, etc. It includes a 



74 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

-discussion of the physical and chemical properties of 
the metals and of their alloys, the ores and their treat- 
ment, and the processes by whteh the metals- are ob- 
tained from the ores, with chemical reactions involved. 
4. Course in agricultural chemistry: This consists 
*of lectures on chemistry in its application to agriculture 
(two per week, during second and third terms), and 
includes a thorough discussion of the origin, composi- 
tion and elassifiation of soils, the composition 
and growth of plants, the sources of plant food and 
how obtained, the improvement of soils, the manufacture 
and use of fertilizers, the chemical principles involved 
in the rotation of crops, the feeding of live stock, and 
the various operations carried on by the intelligent and 
■successful agriculturist. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Johnson's How Crops Grow, and How Crops Feed, Lupton's Ele- 
mentary Principles of Scientific Agriculture, Johnson's and Cam- 
eron's Elements of Agricultural Chemistry, Storer's Agriculture in 
Relation to Chemistry, scientific journals, reports of the United 
States Department of -Agriculture? and the bulletins and reports of 
the various home and foreign agricultural- departments and stations- 

5. . The course of systematic laboratory work : This 
course of practical work in the laboratory is carried on 
in connection with each course of lectures. In the junior 
year the work embraces the practical operations of 
chemical synthesis and analysis and includes the prep- 
aration of the non-metallic elements and their most im- 
portant compounds, in addition to a systematic study of 
the metals and their compounds, their separation and 
identification. In the senior year students pursue work 
in quantitative analysis, including analysis of fertil- 
izers, soils, coal, iron ore, iron and steel, sugars and 
tsugar products, feed stuffs, minerals, mineral waters, 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



t<) 



etc., being varied somewhat to suit the individual object 
of the student 

The laboratories, which are open from 2 a,^ m. to 5 p. m., during 
six days in the week, are amply supplied with everything neces- 
sary for instruction in chemica^nalnpulation in qualitative and 
quantitative anaylsis, and in the method of prosecuting chemical 
Tesearches. Unusual facilities are offered to students who wish to 
.devote their time to the special study of practical chemistry. 

Each student on entering the chemical laboratory is furnished 
with a work table, a set of re-agent bottles and the common re- 
agents and apparatus used in qualitative or quantitative analysis. 

At the close of the session he will be credited with such arti- 
cles as may be returned in good order; the value of those which 
Jiave been injured or destroyed will be deducted from his contingent 
fee. 

In addition to the analytical work above described it is designed 
to give during the session a short course in electro-plating. Prac- 
tical instruction in the electro-deposition of nickel, silver, gold,etc, 
upon other metals will be given, .and, in addition, the application of 
electrolysis to chemical analysis will be studied both theoretically 
jand practically. 

Text-Books. 

In qualitative analysis— Jones, Sellers, Fresenius, Plattner. 

In quantitative analysis.— Fresenius, Cairns, Sutton, Rose, Blair's 
Analysis of Iron and Steel, Bunsen, Rickett's Notes on Assaying, 
Mitchell's Manual of Practical Assaying. 

In agricultural chemical analysis— Official methods of the Asso- 
ciation of Agricultural Chemists, Wiley's Principles and Practice 
<of Agricultural Analysis. 

CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 
[For description of the building see page 16.] 

The chemical apparatus recently purchased for the laboratory 
consists of a full supply of the most approved instruments for prac- 
tical work and investigation. The building is supplied with water 
and gas and every appliance required to meet the demands of mod- 
ern scientific instruction and research. In addition to the appa- 
ratus usually supplied to first-class laboratories, there have been 
imported a new and improved Schmidt and Hensch's polariscope, 
four short-arm Becker balances of latest pattern, Bunsen spectro- 
scope, Abbe refractometer and other instruments for delicate and 
accurate work. 



^/> 



C Alabama- Polytechnic Institute. 

HISTORY AND LATIN. 

PROFESSOR PETRIE. 

ASSISTANT BOYD. 
HISTORY. 

Ill this department the aim is not so much to memo- 
rize facts as to understand them. Strong emphasis is 
laid on the fact that history is not a succession of iso- 
lated facts, but a progressive whole, each event being 
at once the cause and the effect of other events. The 
students are taught to. investigate the growth of ideas 
and institutions, the rise and progress of .great 'historical 
movements and the reciprocal influences of men and cir- 
cumstances. Frequent use is made of diagrams, photo- 
graphs, charts and maps, with which the department is 
well equipped. Instruction is given by text-books, lec- 
tures and class discussion, but a constant effort is made 
to stimulate to wider reading and research in the library. 

In the freshman class, the subjects studied are the 
United States, Alabama, and England. The first term 
(two hours per week) is devoted to the history and gov- 
ernment of the United States; the second term (two 
hours per week ) to Alabama, and the third term ( three 
hours per week ) to the history of England. 

In the sophomore class (three hours per week until 
March) the subject studied is general European history. 

HISTORICAL LABORATORY. 

in the junior and senior classes opportunity for spe- 
cial work in United States history is slven those stu- 
dents of the General Course who elect it as laboratory 
work, and to any others who are properly qualified. The 
chief object kept in view is training in historical re- 
search and in the formation of independent but careful 
opinions based on the original sources of information, 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



77 



as well as on the standard authorities. Emphasis is 
laid on the importance of securing proper material for 
investigation and every incentive is given to the col- 
lection and use of new documents, papers and letters 
illustrative of Southern,, and especially Alabama his- 
tory. I ' , 

The method of work is as follows: Informal lectures are given 
on important and suggestive points, as: The causes of tfce Revo- 
lution; the Constitutional Convention; the War of 1812; the Mis- 
souri Compromise; the Monroe Doctrine; Texas and Mexico; the 
Compromise of 1850; the Kansas Struggle; the Dred Scott Decision; 
Secession. After each lecture topics connected with it are assigned 
to fthe students with an outline of the points to be investigated. 
They report their results to the class and a discussion follows. 
The final results are collected by each student according to his 
own judgment in his note-book, which is then passed in to the 
professor for correction and suggestion. 

Graduate students are expected to take part in the junior and 
senior discussions and in addition will meet with the professor 
for conference in regard to their work. Those who take history as 
their major subject are expected to devote a large part of their 
time to original research upon some topic on which they can con- 
sult the original sources of information. They are also required 
to pursue a prescribed course of reading as indicated below: 

Text-Books. 

Freshman Class. — Cooper, Estill & Lemmon's History of the 
United States, Brown's History of Alabama, Montgomery's English 
History. 

Sophomore Class. — Myers's General History. 
Junior and Senior Classes. — Moore's American Congress. 

Graduate Course. — Wilson's Division and Reunion, selected parts 
of Stephen's Constitutional History, and of Rhodes's History of 
the United States, Fiske's Critical Period, Lodge's Hamilton, Morse's 
Jefferson, Schurz's Clay, Lodge's Webster, Sumner's Andrew Jack- 
son. 

LATIN. 

The objects kept in view in this department are: An 
accurate knowledge of the forms and syntax; a famil- 
iarity with Latin words, their etymology and their Eng- 




ib 



Alabama Polytechnic IxsTrruxE. 



lish derivatives; an appreciation of Latin literature and 
an intelligent conception of Roman history and civiliza- 
tion, both in themselves and in their effect on the mod- 
ern world. 

A systematic course of instruction is given in the forms and 
syntax. These are taught both deductively from a grammar and 
inductively from the text read. Translation is constantly practiced, 
sometimes at sight, sometimes after being assigned for preparation. 
English passages based on the author read or illustrative of special 
constructions are put in Latin, both orally and in writing. Great 
emphasis is laid on the etymology of the words in the text read. 

In connection with every author studied in class a course of 
reading in English is prescribed descriptive of his life work and 
times. The historical setting and the literary value of his writ- 
ings are carefully discussed and frequent comparisons are made 
with modern authors. 

For the benefit of students who do not study the Latin language 
a series of popular lectures will* be given upon the great Latin 
writers. Especial emphasis is laid on proficiency in writing Latin 
exercises and in translating Latin prose at sight. 

Text-Books, 

Freshman Class. — Allen & Greenough's Grammar, Exercises, 
Nepos, Sallusit or equivalent. 

Sophomore Class. — Cicero, Allen & Greenough's Grammar Ben- 
nett's Latin Composition. 

Junior Class— Virgil, Horace, Allen & Greenough's Grammar, Ex- 
ercises, Guerber's Mythology, Preston & Dodge's Private Life of the 
Romans. 

Senior Class.— Livy, Tacitus, Wilkins's Latin Literature, Exer- 
cises, History of Rome. 



MODERN LANGUAGES. 

PROFESSOR WIATT. 

The chief aim in this department is to give the stu- 
dent a thorough and accurate knowledge of the element- 
ary principles of the subjects taught, and to enable him 
to read with facility the ordinary French and German 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 71* 

at sight. To train the ear, acquire a correct pronuncia- 
tion and some facility in speaking, all recitations are 
supplemented, as far as practicable, by oral exercises in. 
the languages themselves. 

The following regular courses are given in French and 
German. 

French — First Year. Three recitations a week. Dur- 
ing this year the principal object is to acquire a knowl- 
edge of the elements of grammar and a correct pronun- 
ciation,, together with a facility in translating ordinary 
French. Reading is begun at an early stage, and the 
principles of grammar are illustrated and impressed 
by frequent exercises in rendering English into French. 

Second Year: Three recitations a week. During thi& 
year almost the same line of work is pursued as that 

t 

begun the previous year. More difficult and varied 
French is read, and instruction is given upon the laws of 
grammar, the construction of the language, and the 
history of the literature. Special attention is given to 
sight translation. 

German — Two Y<ars: Three recitations a week the 
first year, three a week the second year. In this course 
the aim and the methods are similar to those in French.. 

The students in this department will meet the pro- 
fessor twice per week, from 4 to 5 p. in. during the first 
term, and the third term, for exercises in conversation in 
French and in German- ^ 

Text-Books. 

French — First Year: Edgren's Grammar and Locard's Supple- 
mentary Exercises. Super's Reader. 

Second Year. — Feuillet's Le Roman d'un Jeune Homme Pauvre, 
Racine's Esther, Corneille's Le Menteur, Moliere's Le Bourgeois; 
Gentilhomme, selected plays, Whitney's Grammar, original exer- 
cises. 
German — First Year: Joynes-Meissner's Grammar and Reader- 
Second Year: Der Bfbliothekar, Wilhelm Tell, Whitney's Grami- 
mar and Exercises, selected plays, original exercises. 






30 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

graduate course. 

This course is offered for the benefit of those students 
who wish to pursue the study of these subjects beyond 
the scope to which a two-year course necessarily limits 
them. Here, in addition to the authors studied in the 
lecture room, a wide and extensive reading of authors 
and literature is prescribed. 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

PROFESSOR DUNSTAN. 

ASSISTANT JEPSOX. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

The students in this course study English, French or German, 
Physics, Mathematics, etc., as prescribed for the course of Civil 
Engineering in the junior and senior years and in addition thereto 
prosecute their studies in electricity and mechanics as herein pre- 
scribed. 

Instruction is i>iven by lectures and recitations. 

First Term : Four hours per week are devoted to the 
study of the principles of electricity and magnetism, 
with especial reference to their industrial applications. 
The subject of electrical measurements is also treated in 
detail. 

Second Term: Incandescent lighting, four hours per 
week. 

Third Term: Arc lighting and wiring, four hours 
per week. 

Text-Books. 

Ayrton's Practical Electricity. Houston and Kennelly's Incandes- 
cent and Arc Lighting. Cushing's Standard Wiring. 





Hfi &m " j ^B^B 









s*r 






sMaw- 



in iiiii)iiiiw» irJ *~' w '''' ■Minwiii 



ELECTRICAL BUILDING. 




H 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



81 



Laboratory Work.— Four hours per week are given 
to work in the laboratory. This includes management 
of batteries, construction of instruments, electro-plating, 
electrical measurements, verification of the principles 
upon which the measurements of current, electromotive 
force and resistance are based, etc. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term: Dynamo electric machinery, five hours 
per week. 

Second Term : Alternating currents and alternating 
current machinery. 

Third Term : Polyphase machinery and power trans- 
mission, five hours per week. 

Text-Books. 

Dynamo Electric Machinery, Thompson. Alternating Currents, 
Franklin and Williamson. Standard Polyphase Apparatus, Oudin. 

Laboratory Work. — Six hours per week are devoted 
to practical laboratory w r ork, electrical measurements, 
relation of electric currents to heat and mechanical 
work, care and tests of dynamo and motors, calibration 
of voltmeters, ammeters and watt-meters, electric light- 
ing, management and care of accumulators, energy con- 
sumed in lamps, adjustment and care of arc lamps, 
proper wiring of buildings, the application of electricity 
to street railways, magnetic measurements, tests of 
transformers and alternating motors, etc. 



Drawing and Construction. — Two hours per week in 
the senior ve?r are devoted to the design and eonstrur 
tion of electrical machinery. 

Encouragement is offered to advanced students for conducting 
original investigations, and opportunity is taken to stimulate a 
spirit of scientific inquiry. Courses of reading are suggested to such 
students in connection with their experimental work. 

6 




82 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 




In addition to the usual laboratory work, senior stu- 
dents spend a portion of their time in the boiler room, 
learning the management and care of the steam plant, 
and in turn take charge of the lighting plant, thus be- 
coming familiar with running the engines and dynamos. 

Post Graduate Course. — To graduate students more 
advanced courses in the theorj^ and applications of alter- 
nating currents and alternating current machinery are 
given. The courses will be varied slightly from year to 
year to suit the needs of those taking the course. 

In connection with this work suitable laboratory work 
will be given. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



83 




84 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



equipment. 

The laboratory is well supplied with batteries, storage and pri- 
mary, telephones, plating apparatus and similar minor apparatus. 
Among the instruments of precision may be noted Kelvin ampere 
balances, graded current and potential galvanometers alternat- 
ing and direct current ammeters and voltmeters of various ranges, 
from Weston, Queen, Jewell, Hartmann & Braun, Despretz, Fein, 
General Electric Company and other domestic and foreign makers. 
There are also direct reading and recording watt meters, dynamom- 
eters reading from .0001 ampere to 100 amperes, a number of 
resistance boxes and bridges, condensers, keys, galvanometers of 
various types, magnetic testing apparatus, portable and fixed, pho- 
tometers, high potential testing apparatus, portable testing set, 
cradle dynamometer, a special instrument for comparing induct- 
ances, self and mutual, and capacities. 

This department, being provided with Lord Kelvin's standard 
electrical instruments for exact measurements, will calibrate free 
of expense, any ammeter or voltmeter that may be sent to the Col- 
lege. 

In the dynamo room the following are installed: One Weston 
150 volt, 20 ampere dynamo, with rheostat; one Brush 6 arc light 
dynamo, with regulator and six lamps; one Ideal 5 kilo-watt three 
phase alternator; one Thompson-Houston 9 arc light dynamo with 
lamps; one Edison compound wound 12 kilo- watt generator; a 
Thompson-Houston 110 volt, 75 ampere generator; two street car 
motors used as either direct or alternating current gen- 
erators or motors; two polyphase induction motors; one General 
Electric 5 horse-power induction motor, mounted on cradle dyna- 
mometer; General Electric 20 horse-power motor; one Stanley in- 
duction motor with conaensers; Edison Zy 2 kilo-watt generator; 
a Crocker-Wheeler one horse-power motor and rheostat, and one 
bi-phase alternator, and 500 volt generator, made by special stu- 
dents, furnish current to laboratory and light up the different build- 
ings. A lamp board with a capacity of 210 lamps has been installed 
and is used for testing purposes. 

The dynamos occupy a separate brick building 50x32 feet, and are 
operated by a 35-horse power Westinghouse vertical engine, and a 25- 
horse power Atlas engine. 

An electric motor, made by students, supplied with current from 
a generator at a distance of 3,000 feet, operates a gin, gin press, 




s" 





WOOD ROOM 



i 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



85 



ensilage cutter and feed cutter at the experiment station farm. 
This motor not only subserves a usefui purpose in the operation 
of these machines, but is an excellent illustration of the electric 
transmission of power. 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND MECHANIC 

ARTS. 

PROFESSOR WiLMORE. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR CRENSHAW. 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR FULLAN. 

INSTRUCTOR TRAMMELL. 
ASSISTANT HILL. 

The course in manual training covers three years, as 
follows: First year, wood-working — carpentry and 
turning; second year, pattern making and foundry and 
forge work— molding, casting and smithing; third year, 
machine shop — chipping and filing and machine work in 
metals. 

This course is obligatory upon the students of the 
two lower classes. For satisfactory reasons a student 
may be excused from this laboratory work by the Fac- 
ulty. 

The full work of each class is six hours per week, in 
three exercises of two hours each. 

The power for running the apparatus in this department is de- 
rived from a twenty-five horse-power Harris-Corliss automatic en- 
gine. A steam pump and a heater for the feed-water form a part 
of the steam apparatus. For the steam plant a substantial brick 
boiler-house and chimney have been erected, and a 100-horse power 
Heine boiler installed. 

The equipment for the wood-working shops comprise the fol- 
lowing: 30 wood-working benches, each with complete set of car- 
penter's tools; 24 turning-lathes 10-inch swing each with complete 
set of tools; 1 double circular saw; 1 band saw; 1 board-planing 



86 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



machine; 1 jointer; 1 pattern-maker's lathe 16-inch swing; 1 36-inch 
grindstone. The tool room is supplied with a variety of extra hand 
tools for special work and in addition to the regular carpenters' 
tools in the benches each student is supplied with a set of chisels 
and plane irons with a locker to keep them in and is held respon- 
sible for their care and condition. 

The equipment for the foundry consists of molding benches for 
18 students, each supplied with a complete set of molder's tools; a 23- 
inch Colliau cupola, with all modern improvements, capable of melt- 
ing 2,000 pounds of iron per hour; a brass furnace in which can 
be melted 100 pounds of brass at a heat, with a set of crucible tongs, 
etc. Also a full supply of ladles, large and small molding flasks, a 
foundry crane, special tools, etc. 

The forge shop equipment consists of 24 down draft forges of new 
pattern each with a set of Smith's tools, anvil etc. The blast for 
all the forges is supplied with a No. 3 Sturtevant steel pressure 
blower (which also furnishes blast for the foundry cupola), and a 
60-inch underground exhaust blower draws the smoke from the 
fires into the smoke flues and forces it out through the chimney. 

The machine department occupies a brick building 30x50 feet, and 
is equipped with eight engine-lathes (screw-cutting 14-inch swing, 
six foot bed; 2 engine lathes, 16 inch swing (one with taper attach- 
ment) ; 1 engine lathe, 18-inch swing, with compound rest and taper 
attachment; 1 speed-lathe, 10-inch swing; 1 20-inch drill press 
(power feed); 1 10-inch sensitive drill; 1 15-inch shaper; 1 22-inch 
x22-inchx5 feet planer; 1 universal milling machine, 1 corundum tool 
grinder (14-inch wheel); 1 bench grinder; 1 post drill press; 1 
Brown and Sharpe universal grinding machine; 1 power hack 
saw. A part of the room is set apart for vise work, chipping and 
filing; and benches for twelve students are provided, each with vise 
and set of files, chisels, hammers, etc. In the tool room is .to be 
found a good supply of machinists' tools for general shop use, 
such as lathe and drill chucks, drills, reamers, taps, dies, gauges, 
files, cutting and measuring tools, and special appliances for ma- 
chine work, with machine for grinding twist drills. 

The nature of the work in each department is as fol- 
lows : 

First Yeab. 

I. A course of carpentry or hand work covering the first two 
terms.. The lessons include instruction in the nature and use of 
tools, instruction and practice in shop drawing, elementary work 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



87 



with plane, saw, chisel, different kinds of joints, timber splices, 
cross joints, mortise and tenon, mitre and frame work, dovetail 
work, comprising different kinds of joints used in cabinet making, 
light cabinet work, examples in building, framing, roof-trusses, etc. 
II. A course in turning, extending through the third term. The 
lessons comprise nature and use of lathe and tools, plain straight 
turning, caliper work to different diameters and lengths, simple and 
compound curves, screw plate and check work, hollow' and spherical 
turning. 

Second Year. 

I. Course in forge work in iron and steel, occupying the first term. 
The lessons are arranged so that the students in making the series 
of objects, become familiar with the nature of the metals and the 
successive steps in working them by hand into simple and complex 
forms, as drawing, upsetting, bending, cutting, punching, welding, 
by various methods tool-forging, tempering, hardening, etc. 

II. A course in pattern-making covering the second term. The 
work includes a variety of examples of whole and split patterns, 
core work, etc., giving the students familiarity with the use of pat- 
terns for general molding. 

III. A course in molding and casting in iron and brass occupying 
the third term. The work consists for the most part of small arti- 
cles, such as light machine parts, but a sufficient variety of forms 
are introduced for the student to acquire a good general and prac- 
tical knowledge of the usual methods and appliances used in light 
foundry work. Most of the work is in greensand in two part 
flasks; core work is also given and some three part flask and 
some dry sand work is introduced. 

The same patterns which have been previously made by students 
are used besides special patterns for occasional larger or more 
complicated work. Instruction and practice is given in working the 

cupola. 

In connection with this second year work, a series of lectures is 
given on the metallurgy and working of the metals used in the 
industrial arts, cast and wrought iron, steel, brass, etc. 

Thibd Yeae. 

I. Conrse of chipping and filing, covering the first term The 
lessons comprise work on cast and wrought iron; chipping .to , line 
on flat and curved surfaces, key-seating, etc., filing and flnishmg to 



88 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



line (straight and curved), surface filing and finishing, fitting, 
slotting, dovetail work, sawing, pin and screw filing, surface finish- 
ing with scraper, etc. 

II. Machine work occupying the remainder of the year. The 
work includes cast and wrought iron; steel and brass; turning to 
various diameters and lengths, taper turning, facing with chuck and 
face plate, drilling— both in lathe and drill press— reaming, boring, 
screw-cutting in lathe and with taps and dies, planing, slotting, etc., 
with planer and shaper, milling various forms with the milling ma- 
chine, including exercises in making taps, reamers, etc., fitting, 
grinding, polishing, etc. 

Lectures are also given during the year on various subjects con- 
nected with machine work in metals; such as forms, construction and 
use of the various machines, cutting tools, gearing, gauges, screw 
threads, etc. During the last term some piece of construction work 
is given the classes. 

All of the work is done from blue prints made by the class in 
drawing. In the construction work the student is given a blue 
print and the material for a certain part. He is then encouraged 
to study the work and plan the best method of doing it. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 
JUNIOR YEAR. 

Elementary Mechanics, — Three hours a week for the 
first term are devoted to this subject. The fundamental . 
laws underlying all mechanical science and the mechan- 
ics of liquids, gases and vapors are studied. 

Kinematics.— Three recitations per week during the 
second and third terms are devoted to this subject. 

Under this head machines are analyzed and their elementary com- 
binations of mechanism studied. The communication of motion 
by gear-wheels, belts, cams, screws and link-work, the different 
ways of obtaining definite velocity ratios and definite changes of 
velocity, parallel motions and quick return motions as well as 
the designing of trains of mechanism for various purposes, together 
with the theoretical forms of teeth for gear wheels to transmit the 
motion through these trains, are investigated under this subject. 

Mechanical Drawing —During the first term the students make 
drawing to exact scale, of some of the simpler machines. The stu- 
dent takes his own measurements and makes his own sketches from 
which to make the finished drawing. 




mm 



^ 







MP 



0) O X3 



bD 



a &uo 



a "2 £ -* 



s 3 « 






0> 



' rj -m cm 2J Jh Q) 

a § a © oj a? ^ 



& 

^ 



* a 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



89 



Text-Books. 



Wood's Elementary Mechanics, Barr's Kinematics of Machinery. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Mechanical Engineering of Power Plants.— The first 
terpi five hours per week is given to the study of the 
practical applications of steam machinery. It is be- 
lieved that a thorough knowledge of the apparatus in 
actual practical use is the best preparation a student can 
have for the study of the theory, and to that end, the dif- 
ferent types of engines, boilers, pumps, condensers, and 
other auxiliary apparatus are taken up and studied in 
detail, and the advantages and disadvantages of each 
discussed. Extensive files of manufacturer's catalogues 
are kept and the technical papers and magazines in the 
library are freely used in order to keep in touch with the 
latest and best practice in engineering work. 

Steam Engine.— The second term five hours per week 
will be given to the study of the theory and efficiency of 
the steam engine, with discussions of the effects of con- 
densation in cylinder, action of fly wheels, effects of jack- 
eting, ete. Simple and compound engines, various 
valves and cut-off motions, and the principal types of 
modern engines are studied. Special attention is given 
to the steam engine indicator. 

Applied Mechanics.-The third term, four hours per 
week is given to work in this subject. Applications of 
the mechanical principles previously learned, are made 
to the solution of practical problems. Considerable at- 
tention is given to graphical methods, these being used 
in preference to the analytical when possible. 

One hour a week for the third term is given to a series 
of lectures on mechanical refrigeration and gas and gaso- 
lene engines. 

8 






90 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



j 



Machine Design.— The subject of machine design is 
made a continuation of the junior course and runs 
throughout the year, two hours a week. The general 
plan of the work follows the text-book adopted, but va- 
riations are made and additional exercises given when 
found desirable. The strength and proportion of joints, 
fastenings and machine details are studied. Problems 
are given, the dimensions worked out and the drawings 
made. It is the purpose of the course, as far as time will 
permit, to prepare students for practical drawing-room 
work. 

Laboratory Work. — The students are not only taught how to cali- 
brate and use the different instruments, but they are brought in con- 
tact with engineering appliances under practical working con- 
ditions. 

Thoroughness of work is sought rather than the performance of a 
large number of experiments. 

The following course has been arranged: 

Calibration of steam gauge; calibration of indicator spring; cali- 
bration of thermometer; calibration of scales and balances; calori- 
meter tests with barrel, separating and throttling calorimeters; 
boiler test wiith determination of the quality of steam and analysis 
of flue gas; efficiency test of engine with brake and indicator power 
measurement; test of hot air pumping engine; efficiency and duty 
of a steam pump; tensional, compressional and transverse tests of 
cast iron, wrought iron, steel and wood, in which are observed the 
limit of elasticity, the ultimate breaking strength and the modulus 
of elasticity. 

This class usually makes a test of some electric plant or mill some 
time in the last term. 

The apparatus for carrying on this work consists of a 100-horse 
power Heine boiler, a 45-horse power Imperial cross compound en- 
gine, especially arranged for experimental work, supplied with 
Wheeler surface condenser and Deane air pump and circulating 
pump; of a 25-horse power Harris-Corliss engine, a 35-horse power 
Westinghouse engine, a 25-horse power Atlas engine, two 9-horse 
power engines constructed by students in the shops, a duplex Deane 
steam pump, an Ericsson hot air engine, a Westinghouse air pump, 
four steam engine indicators, a separating' calorimeter, pyrometers, 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



91 



scales, a standard steam gauge with apparatus for testing steam 
gauges, a Crosby dead weight tester for correcting the standard 
gauge, a 35,000 pound testing machine, and Henning micrometer 
extensometer, a Carpenter calorimeter with auxiliary apparatus 
for determining the heating value of different fuels, a draft gauge, 
and a Henning pocket recorder. 

Text-Books. 

Hutton's Mechanical Engineering of Power Plants, Holme's Steam 
Engine, Reid's Machine Design, Perry's Applied Mechanics. 

, REFERENCE BOOKS. 



The Library contains a number of standard works on the various 
subjects studied, and the students are referred to them constantly 
for more extended treatment of many points that come up in class. 

POSTGRADUATE COURSE. 

The following course has been arranged and represents the 
amount of work required. Hydraulics may be substituted for 
thermodynamics if the members of the class are unanimous in 
wishing the change. Other substitutions may be made at the 
option of the professor, provided they represent an equivalent 
amount of work and are in the general line of the course selected. 

Dynamometers— This includes dynamometers and the measure- 
ment of power. Absorption and transmission dynomometers are 
studied, with their application and use in testing steam engines. 

Valve Gears.— The different forms of valve gears of steam en- 
gines are studied, and problems in designing gears are worked out. 

Thermodynamics of the Steam Engine.— This subject is studied 
theoretically and practically, and attempts a complete analysis of 
the action of steam in an engine. 

Laboratory Work.-As much advanced laboratory work will be 
given as can be arranged with the appliances at hand. 

Text-Books. 

Flatter's Dynamometers and Measurement of Power, Spangler's 
Valve Gears, Peabody's Thermodynamics of the Steam Engine, Mer- 
riman's Hydraulics. 



92 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



AGRICULTURE. 

PROFESSOR DUGGAR. 

Instruction in agriculture is given by means of lec- 
tures, text-books, bulletins of the agricultural experi- 
ment stations, and practical work in field, barn, and 

dairy. 

The study of agriculture begins with the freshman 
class in the third term, and extends through three terms 
of the sophomore year and two terms of the junior year. 
The time devoted to this study in the lecture room is 
two hours per week with each class. 

The subjects studied by the freshman class are the 
breeds of horses, cattle, sheep and hogs — their charac- 
teristics, uses, management and adaptability to the 
South. Practical work in judging live stock is included 
in the course. Five breeds of cattle and two of hogs are 
represented in the herd maintained by this department. 
The first term of the sophomore year is devoted to 
dairying and to a study of the principles of live stock 
breeding. Dairying will be taught by practical work in 
the dairy — butter making, determination of fat in milk 
by the Babcock method, etc., — as well as by instruction 
in the lecture room. 

In the second term of the sophomore year the follow- 
ing subjects are studied : Soils — chemical and physical 
properties, defects, and means of improvement ; the con- 
trol of water, including means of conserving moisture 
in times of drought, terracing, underdrainage, and open 
and hillside ditches; objects and methods of cultivation ; 
agricultural implements; rotation of crops; and im- 
provement of plants by crossing, selection, and culture. 
The third term of the sophomore year is devoted to 
the staple crops produced in Alabama* to forage plants 
adapted to the South, and to plants valuable for the 
renovation of soils. The more important crops are 
treated with reference to varieties, soil and fertilizer re- 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



93 



quirements, methods of planting and cultivating, and 
uses. 

In the junior year the subjects of feeding animals and 
of farm management are studied. Among the topics 
included under the latter heading are different systems 
of farming and stock growing, farm equipment and 
building, silos and silage, care of farm manures, com- 
posting, choice and methods of applying commercial fer- 
tilizers for different crops and soils, and economical 
methods of improving exhausted soils. 

In every class the student is encouraged to independent thought 
on agricultural problems rather than to depend on "rules of thumb," 
so that he may be prepared to adapt his practice in after years 
to changed conaitions of soil, climate, capital, market, etc. The suc- 
cessful farmer must be a thinker rather than a blind follower of 
inflexible rules. 

The effort is made to keep before the student the difference be- 
tween the widely applicable principles on which every rational sys- 
tem of farming rests and the details that vary with changing con- 
ditions. The conditions of soil, climate, etc., prevailing in different 
parts of Alabama are kept constantly in view. \ 

As far as limited time allows, attention is directed to agricultural 
literature now accumulating so rapidly in this and in foreign coun- 
tries, to the end that in future years the student may know where 
and how to seek the information that he may need. 

Applicants for post-graduate work in agriculture will be assigned 
special research work and aided in the line of investigation deemed 
best for each individual student. 

BEFEBENCE BOOKS. 

Horses, Cattle, Sheep and Swine, by Curtis; The Study of Breeds, 
by Shaw Milk and Its Products, by Wing; Dairyman's Manual, by 
Stewart; Soils and Crops of the Farm,Morrow & Hunt; Forage Plants 
by Shaw; The Fertility of the Soil, by Roberts; Corn Culture, by 
Plumb; The Soil, by King; Manures and the Principles of Manuring, 
by Aikman; Drainage for Profit and Health, by Waring; Agriculture 
in Some of its Relations with Chemistry, by Storer; ^£*£ 
Feeding by Armsby; Feeds and Feeding, by Henry; Stock Breeding 
by Miles; Hand-book of Experiment Station WrJ -«JJ 
lected publications of the various divisions of theU S. Department 
of Agriculture and the agricultural experiment stations. 

9 



i.*- 



94 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

BIOLOGY AND HORTICULTURE. 

PROFESSOR EARLE. 

ASSISTANT MASON. 



The subject of biology is required of the senior class 
in the courses of chemistry and agriculture, and of phar- 
macy. It occupies five hours a week for three terms of 
the senior year. The work in this department will be 
largely confined to the study of the lower forms of plant 
life and to vegetable physiology, or the study of plants 
as living beings. Under the first head special attention 
will be given to the bacteria and other diseases produc- 
ing organisms of man and the higher animals; and to 
the parasitic fungi that cause diseases of plants. Under 
vegetable physiology those problems that explain the 
foundation for correct agricultural practices will be 
made most prominent. This will include the germina- 
tion of seeds, the food and nutrition of plants, the cir- 
culation of sap, the processes of reproduction, plant 
variability, etc. 

The instruction will be by text-book, supplemented by lectures 
and by practical laboratory work. 

The students will be required to make careful microscopic draw- 
ings of objects studied. They will also collect material in the fields 
and determine it so far as their instruction will admit. 

The equipment for instruction in this department comprises, 
besides a sufficient lecture room a students' laboratory and two small 
glass rooms for cultural and bacteriological work. These are sup- 
plied with water, gas and all necessary appliances for thorough 
primary and advanced work, including compound and dissecting 
microscopes for each student, microtomes, parafine baths, incubators, 
steam and dry sterilizers, instantaneous water heaters, Pasteur filter, 
chemical and common balances, set of Brendel's models of para- 
sitic and other fungi, besides a large and well selected stock of 
glassware, staining fluids, chemical re-agents, culture, media, etc. 

In the private office of the department, which is fitted up as a spe- 
cial laboratory for the use of the professor in charge, is located a 





LABORATORY OF BIOLOGY. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



95 



good reference library and the scientific collections of the depart- 
ment. At present these consist of about 17,000 named specimens 
of fungi, and of the other groups of cryptogams. These books and 
collections are accessible to the students, and constitute, with the 
other resources mentioned, a superior equipment for advanced bio- 
logical instruction. 

HORTICULTURE. 

At present special horticultural instruction is con- 
fined to the spring term of the junior year in the course 
of chemistry and agriculture, and to some practical work 
and "field lectures" to the students of the same course 
during the sophomore year. Instruction is given by lec- 
tures and text-book and Iby courses of reading, using 
the green house and orchards and gardens of the experi- 
ment station to give practical illustrations of the sub- 
jects taught. 

Attention is called to the various fruits and vegetables that can 
be successfully cultivated in Alabama, and methods of propagation, 
cultivation and marketing are discussed. Particular attention is 
called to the diseases and insect enemies to which each of these 
crops are liable, and careful directions are given as to the best 
known means of combatting them. The construction and man- 
agement of gree-houses, hotbeds and cold frames receive special 
attention, while such topics as floriculture, landscape gardening 
and forestry are discussed in a general way only. 

Special work will be arranged for any student desiring W take a 
extended course in horticulture. 



MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS. 

COL. B. S. PATRICK, COMMANDANT. 

Military science and tactics are required by law to be 
taught in this institution. The law is faithfully carried 
out by imparting to each student, not physically inca- 
pacitated to bear arms, practical instruction in the 
school of the soldier, of the company and of the battalion 
in close and extended order, also in guard mountings, 
inspections, dress parades, reviews, etc. 



96 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



Under section 1225, U. S. Revised Statutes, the Col- 
lege is provided with modern cadet rifles and accoutre- 
ments. Ammunition for practice firing is used under the 
direction of an experienced officer. The exercises in 
target practice begin the first day of the third term. 

The following uniform of standard cadet gray cloth 
has been prescribed for dress. Coat and trousers as 
worn for fatigue at West Point, with dark blue cadet 
cap. A neat and serviceable uniform can be obtained 
here at $15 to $16. This is less expensive than the usual 
clothing. All students are required to wear this uni- 
form during the session. ♦ 

The entire body of students is divided into companies. 
The officers are selected for military efficiency, good 
conduct and scholarship. The commissioned officers will 
be selected either from the senior or junior classes, and 
promotion will depend on merit and not wholly on se- 
niority. 

A band, composed of cadets, furnishes appropriate 
music at all reviews and parades, and on other special 
occasions. 

A student who has once accepted an office cannot resign it except 
for reasons entirely satisfactory to the President and Commandant. 
The resignation of his office by a minor will usually not be con- 
sidered without first placing all the circumstances of the case be- 
fore his parent or guardian. 

Candidates for appointment or promotion may be required to 
stand an examination. Moral fitness, including demerits, will be 
considered. 

Examinations will be conducted by a board of officers, to be com- 
posed of the Commandant of Cadets and two commissioned officers, 
to be designated by him. The proceedings of the board are sub- 
ject to revision and approval by the President of the College. 

Each company is officered by one captain and two first lieutenants, 
one second lieutenant, and with a proper number of non-commis- 
sioned officers. The officers and non-commissioned officers are dis- 
tinguished by appropriate insignia of rank. These appointments 





C/) 

h 
w 

Q 
< 
O 

U. 
0- 

if) 

Q. 
CC 

O 



\ 









Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 97 

are confirmed by the President on nomination of the Commandant. 
The junior class recites once a week in the United States Infantry 
Drill Regulations. 

The senior class recites once a week in Wagner's Security and 
Information, and Manual of Guard Duty, U. S. Army. 

On the graduation of each class the names of such students as 
have shown special aptitude for military service will be reported 
to the Adjutant-General of the U. S. army and the names of the 
three most distinguished in military science and tactics will be 
inserted in the U. S. Army Register, and published in general or- 
ders from headquarters of the army. 



PHYSIOLOGY AND VETERINARY SCIENCE. 

PROFESSOR CARY. 

ASSISTANT DUNCAN. 

PHYSIOLOGY. 

The sophomore class studies human anatomy, physi- 
ology and hygiene during the entire college year. 

It is the aim of the department to give the students 
practical and real knowledge of the gross anatomy and 
functions of the various parts of the human body. Due 
attention is given, also, to the laws of health--the con- 
ditions mo^t favorable to a continuous healthy action of 
the organs of the human body. 

Instruction is given by lectures and by text-books, 
supplemented by blackboard drawings, charts, models 
of organs, a human skeleton and by dissections of some 
of the smaller animals (dog, cat, etc). 

• Martin's Human Body is used as a text and reference 
book, and several other works w anatomy, physiology 
and hygiene may be consulted in the college library. 

1Q 




98 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



VETERINARY SCIENCE AND ART. 

Students in the agricultural and chemical course of 
study, during the entire junior and senior years, devote 
to this work two hours per week in the class room and 
three hours per week at practical clinics. Instruction in 
veterinary science and art is given by lectures. 

The lectures are arranged with special reference to 
the students fcho are interested in horses or other do- 
mestic animals ; also to those students who contemplate 
studying human or veterinary medicine. While it is 
not the aim to give a complete course in veterinary med- 
icine, we attempt to present the general principles of 
comparative medicine with such special applications 
as are adapted to the conditions and wants of the stu- 
dents. 



- 




f LABoeATOF , 

Bu/LDJNG. 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



99 



Special attention is given to the exterior anatomy of the horse, 
while comparative anatomy is presented mainly in connection with 
the study of the diseases of the different apparatus of the horse or 
other domestic animals. 

Lameness in the horse, minor surgery, the actions and uses of 
the most common medicines, the principles and practice of compara- 
tive medicine, and the ways of protecting the health of domestic 
animals, are considered in as plain and practical a manner as the 
time allotted to each subject will permit. Post-mortem examina- 
tion and the dissection of domestic animals are used as object les- 
sons in the study of general pathology and anatomy. 

The senior class in pharmacy devotes three hours per week, 
during the first and second terms to the study of therapeutics; 
and three hours per week during the third term to class room and 
laboratory work in bacteriology. 

To the post-graduate student this department furnishes work in 
histology, pathology, bacteriology, meat and milk inspection. This 
work gives students who contemplate studying medicine excellent 
preparatory work along that line. Such students may devote their 
entire time to work in this department with the approval of the 

faculty. 

Histology includes methods of injecting small animals, collecting, 
fixing, hardening, embedding, section cutting, mounting, staining, 
examining under the microscope, drawing and describing the dif- 
ferent tissues. 

Pathology is studied in text and reference books and morbid his- 
tology embraces naked eye and microscopic examinations of dis- 
eased tissues in the laboratory. Quite a collection of diseased tis- 
sues and animal parasites are found in connection with the labora- 
tory. 

The laboratory xs well fitted for the study of bacteriology. Bac- 
teriological analysis of water, milk, sputum, pus, diseased tissues, 
and of soils can be made. All of the practical operations in the 
preparation of culture, media, sterilizations, inoculations of small 
animals, straining, microscopical examinations, may be learned. 
In the laboratory are 3 Bausch & Lomb and 2 Winkel microscopes, 
each of which is supplied with oil immersion objectives, 2 oculars, 
Abbe condenser, and iris diaphragm. Sterilizers, autoclaves, in- 
cubators, and all the necessary apparatus required in bacteriological 
work are to be found in the laboratory. 

The department of physiology and veterinary scinece is now 



1 I 



100 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



located by itself in a building which consists of a two-story portion 
containing four laboratory rooms on the second floor and a lecture 
room, museum and office on the lower floor; and a one-story part 
which contains an operating room. 

The building is supplied with water and gas and the laboratory is 
now equipped for work. The museum contains the skeletons of the 
horse, the ox, the sheep and the hog, and a human skeleton. It 
also contains anatomical models of the various parts and organs 
of the human body and models of many parts of the horse, the 
ox and the other domestic animals. It also contains a collection of 
pathological and anatomical specimens, and one of animal para- 
sites. 

The new veterinary hospital building contains five large box- 
stalls, four open single stalls, an office and a feed room on the lower 
floor; the upper floor is used as a storage room for hay, fodder 
etc. The hospital is supplied with, fresh water. 

A new brick and cement dissecting room (16x32) has just been 
completed. It is supplied with extensive north sky-light and with 
water and gas. 

Every Saturday during the college year the department conducts 
a free clinic for the benefit of the students in veterinary science and 
art. Clinical cases have been various and numerous, giving the stu- 
dents opportunity to see and study many diseases and lameness 
and to become proficient in minor operations. 



PHARMACY AND PHARMACOGNOSY. 

PROFESSOR MILLER. 

ASSISTANT MASON. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Pharmacy. — Class wt>rk, three horns a week. The dif- 
ferent systems of weights and measures. Specific grav- 
ity. Pharmaceutical problems. The fundamental opera- 
tions in pharmacy. Apparatus used in pharmaceutical 
processes. Discussion of all classes of pharmaceutical 
preparations. 

Laboratory, nine hours a week, Preparation of offi- 
cial and non-official galenicals. 

Pharmacognosy. — Class work with laboratory work, 





LABORATORY OF PHARMACY. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. . 101 

* 

four hours a week. All official vegetable drugs studied 
with aid of simple and compound microscope. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Pharmacy. — Class work, four hours a week. Official 
and non-official pharmaceutical chemicals, inorganic 
and organic, including the more important newer reme- 
dies. The prescription. Incompatibilities. Doses. 

Laboratory, nine hours a week. Preparation of offi- 
cial and non-official pharmaceutical chemicals, inorganic 
and organic. Pharmaceutical testing by pharmacopoeial 
methods. Drug assaying, special attention given to com- 
pounding of prescriptions. 

Pharmacognosy. — Class work with laboratory work, 
four hours a week. Study of important non-official veg- 
etable drugs; of drugs of animal origin; of adulterants 
and worthless drugs. Practical exercises in identifica- 
tion of pharmaceutical preparations and chemicals. 

The practical work in pharmacy includes the manufacture of not 
less than two hundred pharamaceutical preparations and the com- 
pounding of not less than fifty prescriptions. 

The work in pharmacognosy includes the study of more than 300 
drugs, each of which the student is required to recognize by its 
physical and chemical properties, giving Latin name, common name, 
origin, habitat, constituents, medicinal action and dose. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

GYMNASIUM AND ATHLETIC FIELD. 

The gymnasium is situated at the west end of the ath- 
letic and drill grounds and contains one room, 80x40 
feet, with strong beams above for fastening the usual 

fixtures. 
It is equipped with Spalding's gymnasium apparatus 

11 



102 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

and is open to all students at stated hours, under the 
care of an officer. 

The athletic field has a quarter-mile cinder track and 
ample space for football, baseball and general athletics. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The government of the College is administered by the President 
and Faculty in accordance with the code of laws and regulations en- 
acted by the Trustees. 

Attention to study and punctuality in attendance in recitations 
and all other duties, are required of every student. Students are 
prohibited from having in their possession arms or weapons not 
issued for the performance of military duty, and also from using 
or causing to be brought into the college limits, intoxicating 
liquors. 

Students are not permitted to participate in any public enter- 
tainment, or game, without previously obtaining the consent of the 
faculty. 

No cadet will be permitted, without the approval of his parent 
or guardian, to take part in a public game of football; nor will per- 
mission be given for any athletic game to a student deficient in his 
studies. 

MILITARY DRILL. 

There are three regular military drills each week and all under- 
graduate students, not physically incapacitated to bear arms, are 
required to engage in these exercises; privates of the senior class 
are exempt. 

The drills are short and the duty involves no hardships. The 
military drill is a health-giving exercise, and its good effects in the 
development of the physique and improvement of the carriage of 
the cadet are manifest. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICES. 

Religious services are held every morning in the chapel. 

All students are required to attend these exercises, and also to at- 
tend the church of their choice at least once on Sunday. 

Opportunities are also offered for attending Bible classes every 
Sunday. 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 



103 



This association is regulary organized and has a well furnished 
room on the first floor of the main building set apart for its ex- 
clusive use. Through its weekly meetings it exerts a wholesome 
Christian influence among' the students. 

Students are advised to unite with the Association when they 
enter the Institute. 

The ladies of the different churches in Auburn have recently 
formed an auxiliary association to the Y. M. C. A. of this Institute. 
Assisted by members of the faculty, they will hold monthly a joint 
service of praise in the College chapel and will provide lecturers 
for the occasion. 

They have also undertaken to build a special hall for the use of 
the Association, and will solicit subscriptions for that purpose. 

The following are the officers: 

A. F. Jackson, President. 

G. W. Snedecor, Vice President. 

P. S. Haley, Corresponding Secretary. 

L. Whorton, Recording Secretary. 

J. T. Letcher, Treasurer. 

J. 0. Webb, Librarian. 

LOCATION. 

The Institute is situated in the town of Auburn, fifty-nine miues 
east of Montgomery on the line of the Western Railroad. 

.The region is high and healthful noted for its general good health 
and freedom from malaria, having an elevation of eight hundred 
and twemty-six feet above tide-water. By statute of the State the 
sale of spiritous liquors and keeping saloons of any kind are for- 
bidden. 

BOARDING. 

The Institute has no barracks or dormitories and the students 
board with families in the town of Auburn, and thus enjoy all the 
protecting and beneficial influence of the family circle. 

REGULATIONS. 

(1) Eash student upon entering is required to sign his name 
in the matriculation book and pledge himself to obey the rules and 
regulations of the College. 



1 1 



104 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



(2) Every absence from recitation or examination is graded 
zero. 

(3) When the term grade of a cadet is lowered by reason of ab- 
sence for which satisfactory excuse can be rendered, a special 
term re-examination may be subsequently granted, and the grade 
made on the special re-examination alone is substituted for that pre- 
viously received. 

(4) Only sickness, as reported by the Surgeon, or being absent 
by reason of family sickness, will constitute a satisfactory excuse 
for granting a re-examination. 

When a cadet is called away from College by his parents his 
zeroes for absences are not removed. 

(5) The term grade of a student is the average of his daily ses- 
sional and term examination marks, found by giving due weight to 
the term examination. 

(6) Privates of the senior class in full standing who are candi- 
dates for graduation may be excused by the President from all 
military drills, and also students over twenty-one years of age at the 
time of entering College that are permitted to devote their time to 
one special study, as chemistry, agriculture or pharmacy, provided 
the time devoted to drill is spent by them in laboratory work. 

No cadet can continue an officer in the corps who during a session 
is classed in the fourth grade in two or more subjects at any term 
examination, or in the fourth grade in one subject at two term 
examinations; nor who receives during the session more than 60 

demerits. For failures of officers re-examinations will not be granted. 

• 

DISTINCTIONS. 

Distinctions are awarded in the different subjects of each class to 
those students whose grade for the entire year is above ninety per 
cent. 

Certificates of distinction are awarded in public on commence- 
ment day to those who obtain an average of 90 per cent, in all the 
prescribed studies of a regular class; and also to those who obtain 
three distinctions in the freshman class, four in the sophomore class, 
five in the junior class, and six in the senior class, provided they 
have satisfactorily passed all the regular examinations of that ses- 
sion, and have not received forty demerits during the year. 

A distinction is not given in the senior class if the average grade 
in any one subject is less than 75 per cent. 




' 






. 




GENERAL LIBRARY. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 105 

honors. 

Members of the senior class who attain distinction at the final ex- 
aminations with an average grade, in the subjects required, of 95 per 
cent, will be published as 

GRADUATES WITH HIGHEST HONOR. 

Those who attain distinction with an average grade of 90 per cent., 
and less than 95, are published as 

Graduates with Honor. 

Those who attain less than 90 per cent, and more than 60 per cent, 
are published as Graduates. 

Students, of 'the classes lower than the senior, who attain distinc- 
tion with an average grade in the required subjects of 95 per cent, 
are published in alphabetical order as having attained the Highest 
distinction. 

RECORDS AND CIRCULARS. 

Daily records of the various exercises of the classes are kept by 
the officers of instruction. 

At the close of each term and at regular intervening intervals re- 
ports, giving the grade made by each student, are sent to the parent 
or guardian. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Written examinations on ithe studies of the month are held by 
each professor during the months of October, February and April. 
Each examination occupies one hour. 

At the end of each term written examinations or written and oral, 
are held on the studies passed over during that iterm. 

Special examinations are held only by order of the Faculty, and 
in no case will private examinations be permitted. 

Students falling below the minimum grade at the final examina- 
tions, can be promoted to full standing in the next higher class only 
on satisfactory examinations at the opening of the next session. 

It is required that every student who enters the College shall re- 
main through the examinations at the end of the term. Leaves of 
absence and honorable discharges will, therefore, not be granted 
within three weeks of the examination, except in extreme cases. 

LIBRARY. 

The library occupies an elegant, well-lighted room in the main 
building, and also two smaller adjacent rooms. It contains over 
15,000 bound volumes, including valuable reference and scientific 

12 



!ii . 



106 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



books, with select editions of standard authors, and others suitable 
for students, carefully and recently selected. It is kept open eight 
hours daily for the use of students as a reading room and is thus 
made an important educational feature. 

MUSEUM. 

The museum occupies a large room in the third story. It is pro- 
vided with suitable cases and is equipped with valuable specimens 
and models of an instructive character. It is under the charge of 
Professor P. H. Mell, to whom specimens as contributions may be 
sent. 

BOARDING HOUSES. 

For each house an inspector is appointed, whose duty it is to re- 
port those who, without permission, leave their rooms after "call 
to quarters," or are guilty of any violation of order. The report of 
the inspector is made to the Commandant on alternate days of the 
week. 

Students, after selecting their boarding-houses, are not permitted 
to make changes without obtaining permission from the president, 
and this permission is given only at the close of a term, except for 
special reasons. 

Permission to board. and lodge at separate houses will be granted 
only to seniors, to cadets twenty-one years of age and to those who 
are on the "honor roll," except on special conditions. 



EXPENSES. 

There is no charge for tuition for a resident of Ala- 
bama. 

Incidental fee, per session f 5.00 

Library fee, per session 2.00 

Surgeon's fee, per session 5.00 

$12.00 
These fees are payable on matriculation. By order 

of the trustees no fees can be remitted. 

For students entering after January 1st, the fees for 

a half session only are required. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 107 



For a non-resident of the State there is a charge for 
tuition of $20.00 per session, payable on matriculation, 
in addition to the annual fee of $12.00 payable by all 
students. 

Board, including lodging, fuel and lights, is furnished 
at $12.50 to $15.00 per month. 

The necessary Expenses for a session, not including 
uniforms or books, are for a resident of Alabama, as 
follows: 

College fees f 12.00 $ 12.00 

Board, lodging, fuel and lights 112.50 135.00 

Washing 9.00 9 00 

Total 1133.50 $156.00 

By special arrangement with the College authorities, 
Mrs. M. L. Mitchell, Mr. E. 8. Kutland and 
Mr. B. T. Blasingame will accommodate students with 
board, lodging, fuel, etc., for $9.50 per month. 

Bv boarding at one of these houses the necessary ex- 
penses may be reduced to $106.50 per session. This es- 
timate does not include the cost of the uniform, about 
$15,00, or of books, say from $5.00 to $15.00, or the 
laboratory fees in the higher classes, $5.00 or $10.00. 

LABORATORY FEES. 

For each student in the junior or senior laboratory in 
chemistry, or in electrical and mechanical engineering, 
a fee of $5.00 per session is required. This fee is pay- 
able on admission to the laboratory and is not remitted. 

NON-RESIDENT STUDENTS. • 

Tuition for students, not residents of Alabama, is $20.00 per ses- 
sion, unless remitted by the Trustees to worthy students upon the 
recommendation of the Faculty. 

The remission of this tuition fee to non-resident students will be 
granted in the form of a free scholarship for the succeeding year, 



■^^■p 



108 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

to those who obtain a distinction the preceding year or who, by 
reason of merit, are deemed worthy. 

This tuition for non-residents is remtted to sons of ministers of 
the gospel. 

HONOR SCHOLARSHIPS. 

The following non-resident students were granted, each by reason 
of special merit in conduct and scholarship during the sessionl899- 
1900, an honor scholarship, which exempted from tuition fees: 

R. T. Arnold .Florida. 

W. W. Askew Georgia. 

R. Y. Buchanan Georgia. 

D. Chipley Florida. 

J. D. Elliott Minnesota. 

F. C. Greene Georgia. 

A. F. Jackson Georgia. 

M. Ketchum. i : New York. 

K. E. Lindrose. Louisiana. 

J. H. Mitchell Georgia. 

H. E. Werner Texas. 

W. D. Willis Florida. 

H. M. Yonge Florida. 

J. E. D. Yonge Florida. 

UNIFORM. ■ 

A uniform of cadet gray cloth is prescribed, which all under- 
graduate students are required to wear during the session. The uni- 
forms are made, by a contractor, of excellent cloth manufactured at 
the Charlottesville mill. This suit, including cap, costs at present 
$15.50. It is neat and serviceable, and less expensive than ordinary 
clothing. 

CONTINGENT FEE. 

A contingent fee of five dollars is required to be deposited by each 
student on matriculation, to cover any special or general damage to 
college property for which he may be liable. General damages are 
assessed on the body of students. 

At the close of the session the whole of the contingent fee, or 
the unexpended balance, is refunded to the student. 



* 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 109 

amount of deposit. 

Fees to be paid on entrance: 

Incidental fee . $5 00 

Library . . 2 00 

Surgeon 5 00 

Contingent fee 5 00 

Uniform 5 15 50 

For a resident of Alabama $32 50 $32 50 

Tuition non-resident $20 00 

For a non-resident $52 50 

Besides the above, the student should deposit with the Treasurer 
enough to pay for books, one month's board, incidentals, amount- 
ing to, say, $27.50. Hence, a resident of Alabama should deposit 
with the Treasurer $60,00, a non-resident, $75.00. 

FUNDS OF STUDENTS. 

Parents and guardians are advised to deposit with the Treasurer 
of the College all funds desired for sons, or wards, whether for 
regular charges of college fees or board, or for any other purpose. 
It is the duty of this officer to keep safely all funds placed in his 
hands and to pay all expenses incurred by the students including 
board, uniform, books, etc., when approved. 

When funds are deposited checks are drawn on the Treasurer of 
the College by the Cadet to pay his necessary expenses. These 
checks are paid only when officially approved. The approval is 
given only for necessary expenses, as stated in the catalogue, un- 
less specially requested in writing by the parent. 

The College cannot he held responsible for the expenses of a stu- 
dent, unless the funds are deposited with the treasurer. No stu- 
dent should be permitted to have a large amount of pocket money, 
as it brings only trouble and encourages idleness. 

THESIS. 

Each applicant for a degree is required' to write and ^ submit to 
the Faculty a thesis, or oration and read and dehver the same at 
commencement if reauired by the ^ cu ny. a 

There may be presented, with tne appiov 
Charge, a carefully written report of special work done in a labora 

J3 



110 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

tory showing independent investigation and discussion of some 
subject. 

It must be given to the Professor of English by the first of May. 

The subject must be submitted for approval by January 1st. 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are two literary societies connected with the 
College — the Wirt and the Websterian. Each has a 
hall in the main building. 

These societies hold celebrations on the evenings of 
Thanksgiving Day and 22nd of February. A gentle- 
man, selected bv the Faculty, is invited to deliver an ad- 
dress before the Literary Societies at Commencement. 

To encourage the literary societies the Trustees have 
directed that a medal be awarded on commencement day 
to the member of each society who is both efficient and 
regular in attendance, and who is the best debater. The 
method of selection to be determined by the Faculty. 

EXERCISES IN ELOCUTION. 

On every Saturday morning, immediately after chapel services, 
oratorical exercises in declamation and in original orations are 
conducted by the Professor of English, in the presence of the Faculty 
and students. 

The first and second terms the students of the junior and sopho- 
more classes are exercised in original orations and declamation. 

The second and third terms the members of the senior class read 
essays or deliver original orations. 

SOCIETY OF THE ALUMNI. 

In 1885, the Alumni Society established "The Alumni 
Scholarship." which makes an annual loan of one hun- 
dred and seventy dollars to a beneficiary elected by the 
society Young men have been thus enabled to go through 
college. This scholarship is supported by annual con- 
tributions from the Alumni and other friends of the in- 
stitution. 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. ill 



The beneficiary selected is admitted without charge 
for tuition or college fees of any character. 

Subscriptions should be sent to B. H. Crenshaw, 
Treasurer, Auburn, Ala. 

The annual alumni oration is delivered by a member 
of the society, in Langdon Hall, on Alumni Day, Tuesday 
of commencement week. 

The following are officers of the society : 

R. ap C. Jones. President. 

B. B. Ross 1st Vice-President. 

W. L. Fleming 2nd Vice-President. 

B. H. Crenshaw Treasurer. 

H. H. Kyser Secretary 

A. A. Persons Orator for 1901. 

J. F. Webb Alternate. 

surgeon. 

The surgeon is required to be present at the College 
daily, to visit at their quarters the cadets that are re- 
ported sick, and to give all requisite medical attention 
without other charge than the regular surgeon's fee, paid 
on entering college. 

ACADEMIC YEAR. 

The academic year for 1901-1902 commences on 
Wednesday, 11th September, 1901 (second Wednesday 
after the first Monday), and ends on Wednesday, 11th 
June, 1902 (second Wednesday after first Monday), 
which is commencement day. 

It is divided into three terms. The first term extends 
from the opening of the session to the 20th of Decem- 
ber ; the second term begins January 2nd, and ends 
March 18th ; the third term continues to the close of the 
session. 



112 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



DONATIONS TO THE LIBRARY. 

U. 8. Government— Public Documents, 376 volumes. 

R. L. Thornton, Tuscaloosa, Ala.— History of the Indian Wars, by 
Henry Trumbull. 

Gen. J as. H. Lane, Auburn, Ala.— History of Randolph-Macon Col- 
lege, by Richard Irby. 

Dr. Geo. Petrie, Auburn, A la.— Proceedings of the First Annual 
Meeting of the National Conference on University Extension, com- 
piled by George Francis James. Handbook of University Exten- 
sion, edited by George Francis James. 

Handbook of University Extension (second edition, revised and 
enlarged), edited by George Francis James. 

Political Discussions — Legislative, Diplomatic and Popular, by 
James G. Blaine. 

Report of the Special Committee on the Troubles in Kansas. 

Historic Towns of the Southern States, edited by Lyman P. Pow- 
ell. 

Mrs. N. T. Lupton. — Five hundred pamphlets and periodicals de- 
voted to scientific subjects. 
DONATIONS TO ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 

The General Electric Co. — One kilowatt transformer. 

The Pyle National Electric Headlight Co. — Complete electric 
headlight equipment, consisting of compound steam turbine, dy- 
namo, and projection lamp. 

The Dressel Railway Lamp Works. — One eighteen-inch headlight 
casing and reflector. 

DONATIONS TO AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT. 

Three sacks nitrate of soda from Dr. J. A. Myers, New York, N. Y. 

Two and one-half tons kainit from German Kali Works, New 
York, N. Y. 

One ton muriate of potash from same. 

One lot of seed corn from Curry-Arrington Co., Rome, Ga. 

One lot of seed corn from W. S. Sanders, Danielville, Ga. 

One lot of seed corn from Dr. W. C. Stubbs, Audubon Park, La. 

One lot of seed corn from Prof. C. L. Newman, Fayetteville, Ark. 

One lot of sorghum seed from Curry-Arrington Co., Rome, Ga. 

One Hallock Success Weeder, from Hallock Weeder & Cultivator 
Co., New York, N. Y. 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



113 



DONATIONS TO COLLEGE MUSEUM 
During Session of 1900-1901. 



r 



By E. M. Duncan, brown iron ore of Russellville, Franklin County, 
Ala.; by I. Pickens, D. C. Thornton, E. Taylor, W. H. Chambers — 
several lizzards.; by W. C. Martin, bead purse taken from Indians 
in Barbour County during early settlement of that section; by L. 
Whorton, mole; by J. S. Black, J. M. McNamee, water moccasin; by 
G. F. Boyd, leather-winged bat; by S. H. Brown, snake; by J. 0. Gog- 
gans, tanned snake skin; by R. G. Dawson, relic of Battleship Maine; 
by H. E. Werner, fossils; by W. D. Willis, fossils and minerals, scale 
of tarpon, specimen of coral formation, Indian relics, satin spar, 
mummy clothes, variegated sandstone, fossils and shells; by W. S. 
Rutledge, terrapin; by H. P. Powell, coal, tewenty-seven photographs 
of cliff dwellings in New Mexico; by Dr. W. H. Blake, three 7-foot rat- 
tlesnakes; by J. W. Boyd, Indian relics; by Dr. 0. D. Smith, gold ores, 
quartz rock; by O. H. Alford, mineral ores, manganese ore; by W. L. 
Thornton, box quartz; by G. 0. Dickey, white squirrel; by C. A. Col- 
lins, white water-worn pebble; by E. A. Miller, Columbian half-dollar; 
by W. S. Going, calcite from Pratt City, Ala.; by Miss E. B. Culver, 
two snouts of saw-fish; by E. S. Killebrew, large cane reed; by W. L. 
Anderson, gold-bug; by W. G. Little, herbarium 









112 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



DONATIONS TO THE LIBRARY. 

U. 8. Government.— Public Documents, 376 volumes. 

R. L. Thornton, Tuscaloosa, Ala.— History of the Indian Wars, by 
Henry Trumbull. 

Gen. Jas. H. Lane, Auburn, Ala.— History of Randolph-Macon Col- 
lege, by Richard Irby. 

Dr. Geo. Petrie, Auburn, A la.— Proceedings of the First Annual 
Meeting of the National Conference on University Extension, com- 
piled by George Francis James. Handbook of University Exten- 
sion, edited by George Francis James. 

Handbook of University Extension (second edition, revised and 
enlarged), edited by George Francis James. 

Political Discussions— Legislative, Diplomatic and Popular, by 
James G. Blaine. 

Report of the Special Committee on the Troubles in Kansas. 

Historic Towns of the Southern States, edited by Lyman P. Pow- 
ell. 

Mrs. N. T. Lupton. — Five hundred pamphlets and periodicals de- 
voted to scientific subjects. 
DONATIONS TO ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 

The General Electric Co. — One kilowatt transformer. 

The Pyle National Electric Headlight Co. — Complete electric 
headlight equipment, consisting of compound steam turbine, dy- 
namo, and projection lamp. 

The Dressel Railway Lamp Works. — One eighteen-inch headlight 
casing and reflector. 

DONATIONS TO AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT. 

Three sacks nitrate of soda from Dr. J. A. Myers, New York, N. Y. 

Two and one-half tons kainit from German Kali Works, New 
York, N. Y. 

One ton muriate of potash from same. 

One lot of seed corn from Curry-Arrington Co., Rome, Ga. 

One lot of seed corn from W. S. Sanders, Danielville, Ga. 

One lot of seed corn from Dr. W. C. Stubbs, Audubon Park, La. 

One lot of seed corn from Prof. C. L. Newman, Fayetteville, Ark. 

One lot of sorghum seed from Curry-Arrington Co., Rome, Ga. 

One Hallock Success Weeder, from Hallock Weeder & Cultivator 
Co., New York, N. Y. 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



DONATIONS TO COLLEGE MUSEUM 
During Session of 1900-1901. 




113 



v> 



By E. M. Duncan, brown iron ore of Russellville, Franklin County, 
Ala.; by I. Pickens, D. C. Thornton, E. Taylor, W. H. Chambers- 
several lizzards.; by W. C. Martin, bead purse taken from Indians 
in Barbour County during early settlement of that section; by L. 
Whorton, mole; by J. S. Black, J. M. McNamee, water moccasin; by 
G. F. Boyd, leather-winged bat; by S. H. Brown, snake; by J. 0. Gog- 
gans, tanned snake skin; by R. G. Dawson, relic of Battleship Maine; 
by H. E. Werner, fossils; by W. D. Willis, fossils and minerals, scale 
of tarpon, specimen of coral formation, Indian relics, satin spar, 
mummy clothes, variegated sandstone, fossils and shells; by W. S. 
Rutledge, terrapin; by H. P. Powell, coal, tewenty-seven photographs 
of cliff dwellings in New Mexico; by Dr. W. H. Blake, three 7-foot rat- 
tlesnakes; by J. W. Boyd, Indian relics; by Dr. 0. D. Smith, gold ores, 
quartz rock; by 0. H. Alford, mineral ores, manganese ore; by W. L. 
Thornton, box quartz; by G. 0. Dickey, white squirrel; by C. A. Col- 
lins, white water-worn pebble; by E. A. Miller, Columbian half-dollar; 
by W. S. Going, calcite from Pratt City, Ala.; by Miss E. B. Culver, 
two snouts of saw-fish; by E. S. Killebrew, large cane reed; by W. L. 
Anderson, gold-bug; by W. G. Little, herbarium 



^ 



of** 1 




■■■■ 



INDEX. 



Page. 

Academic Year Ill 

Admission to College 41, 47 

Admission to Higher Classes.. 47 

Agricultural Experiment Station, 6 

Agriculture. '. 8. 53, 58, 92, 95 

Alumni 110,111 

Astronomy 62 

Athletics 100 

Auburn 103 

Auxiliary Schools 44 

Band .... 40 

Biology 12, 94, 95 

Boarding 103, 106 

Botany 12, 65, 67 

Buildings of the College 16 

Cadet Band 40 

Cadet Officers 39, 40, 96 

Calendar, 1901, 1902, second 
page of cover. 

Certificate Schools 44 

Chemistry 10, 53, 72, 75 

Civil Engineering 13, 54, 67, 69 

Classification of Student* by 

residence 38 

Classification of Students by 

studies 37 

College buildings 16 

College established 7 

College, object of 7 

Committees of the Faculty...;.. 5 

Courses of Instruction 48, 61 

Declamation-- Tl, HO 

Degrees 48, 51 



Page. 

Departments of Instruction 62-101 

Discipline 102 

Distinctions 104 

Distinguished Students 21,23 

Donations 1 12, 113 

Drawing 13, 67, 69, 88 

Drill 102 

Electrical Engineering 10. 11, 

55. 80-82 

Elocution 71, 72, 110 

English 69-72 

Examinations, entrance 34-45 

Examinations, monthly and term 105 

Expenses 106, 107, 108 

Experiment Station 6 

Faculty and Officers «% 4 

Farm 8 

Fees, Alabama Students 106-109 

Fees, Non-residents 106-109 

Fees, Contingent 108 

Fees, Laboratory 107 

French ••• ^9 

Freshman Class, roll of 30-32 

General Course 56 

Geology 65 » 67 

German.. ^ 9 

Graduate Courses, see each 

department, also.. 50, 51 

Graduate Students, roll of 19 

Graduates, 1900, roll of 10 

Gymnasium • 101 

History 76,77.78 

Honor Certificates... 21, 22,23 



2078 



O 



o 



116 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



Page. 

Honor (Jraduates 19 

Honor Roll for Conduct 17, 18 

Honor Scholarships 108 

Honor Student* •• •• Hfc 2(> 

Horticulture H > &4» - ,r> 

40 

32-84 

20, 27 



Irregular Students-. ..... 

Irregular Student s, roll of.... 

Junior Class, roll cf 



Laboratories : 
Agriculture & Horticulture. 



8 

Biology • • •■* 1-' ®* 

Botany 12 ' ei5 

Chemistry 1°» 72 - 73 

Drawing • 1& 68 - K,s 

Electrical Engineering 10, 11, SI 

Mechanic Arts 8, 9.85-87 

Mechanical Engineer's. 18 14. 85-91 

$ Mineralogy 12 

Pharmacy 1 4 ' l°°» 1()1 

Physics l2 - ° 2 ' r>3 

Physiology 14i 97 

Veterinary Science ..14, 97-98 

Laboratory Fees 1° 7 

Latin 76,77,78 

Library ^ ()i) 

Literary SocietieH 110 

Mathematics 68 " 65 

Mechanic Arts 8, 9, 58, 85, 87 

Mechanical Drawing *8 

Mechanical Engineering 13,14, 

J 55. 80, 91 

111 

71 

102 

39, 40 



Medical Attendance 

Mental Science 

Military Drill 

Military Organization. 



Military Science and Tactics, 14, 95,96 



Military Science & Tactics. 
distinguished students in... 



Modern Languages. 
Museum 



40, 97 

78-80 

100 



Non-re3ident Students 107, 108 

Objects of the College 7 



Paqb. 

39, 40 

3,4 



71 



Officers, Cadet 

Officers, College , 

Officers of Experim't Station 

Orations 

Pharmacy U, 57, 59, 100, 101 

Philosophy ". 71,72 

Physics ••••• 12,63 

Physiology 14,97-100 



Political Economy 

Political Science 

Professional Degrees 

Records 

Regulations 

Religious Services 

Reports • 

Requirements for Admission 

Sohedule of Exercises 

SeniorClass, roll of 

Societies. Literary 

Society of the Alumni 

Sophomore Class, roll of 

Special and Irregular Stu- 
dents, roll of • •••' 82-85 

Special and Irregular Stu- 
dents, regulations 46,47 

Students, register of 24. 36 

Sub- Freshman Class, roll of. 35-36 

,.. • •• -* 

13 



69-72 

76-78 

51 

105 
103 
102 
105 
41-17 

60, 61 

24-27 

103 

110,111 

28-30 



71. 72 

109 

2 



Surgeon 

Surveying 

Text-Books, see each department. 

Theme-writing 

Theses 

Trustees 

Under- Graduate Student- • 24 " 36 
Uniforms • 96,108 

Veterinary Science 97-100 

Woodwork 85 « 86 

Women admitted to College 44, 45 



Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation 



103 



V 



Catalogue of the Alabama 
Polytechnic Institute 



1901 



rS 



OCLC: 36819652 
Entered: 19970429 



Rec stat: 
Replaced: 



n 
19970429 



Type: 

BLvl: 

S/L: 

Desc: 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

.'15 

16 



a 
s 

a 
040 
007 
043 
090 
090 
049 
110 
245 
246 
246 
246 
260 
300 
310 
362 
500 



ELvl: 
Form: 
Orig: 
SrTp: 
AAA *c 
h *b c 



Used: 
Ctrl: 
MRec: 
ISSN: 
Dates : 



19970429 



Lang: 

Ctry: 

Alph : 

1900,1940 I 



eng 
alu 



*f u *g b *h a *i u *j p I 



2 

10 
10 
10 
10 



I Srce: d GPub: s 
a Conf: Freq: a 
EntW: Regl: r 
Cont: DtSt: d 
AAA 1 
*d b *e f 
n-us-al I 
LD271 *b .A76 1 

*b I 

AAAA I 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute • 1 

Catalogue of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute *h [microform] fl 

Catalog of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute 1 

Catalogue of Alabama Polytechnic Institute 1 

Catalog of Alabama Polytechnic Institute 1 

Auburn, Ala. : *b [The Institute], *c 1900- I 

41 v. : *b ill. ; *c 23 cm. I 

Annual I 

1900-1939-40. 1 

Some years issued as part of the Bulletin of the Alabama 



Polytechnic Institute. 1 



17 500 

18 533 
*d 1997. *c 

19 539 

20 610 20 

21 780 00 



Title varies slightly. I 

Microfilm. *m 1900-1940. *b Mobile, Ala. *c Document Technology, 
microfilm reels : negative ; 35 mm. I 
d *b 1900 *c 1940 *d alu *e u *f u *g a I 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute *x Curricula *x Periodicals. I 
Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama. *t Catalogue of 
he Alabama Polytechnic Institute I 

22 785 00 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. *t Alabama Polytechnic Institute 1 

23 830 Bulletin of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute I 

24 830 USAIN State and Local Literature Preservation Project 5 



API 
TI7I 

• Arc 

1901/02 
0.2 



CALENDAR, J 902- J 903, 



Session Begins... .Wednesday, Sept. 10, 1902. 

Examination for admission Wednesday, Sept. 10, 19^2. 

First term begins Wednesday, Sept. 10, 1902. 

Literary Society Celebration— Thanksgiving Day Nov. 27, 1902. 

First term ends Tuesday, Dec. 23, 1902. 

Second Term Begins Tuesday, Jan. 6, 1903. 

Literary Society Celebration Monday, Feb 23, 1903. 

Senior Class exercises Monday, Feb. 23, 1903. 

Second term ends Saturday, March 14, 1903. 

Third Term Begins Monday, March 16, 1903. 

Senior Thesis Reported Frlaay> May u im 

Sophomore Class exercises ./;..; Friday) May r 19o: 

Field Day .....Friday, May 1, 1903. 

Final examinations begin Fri day, May 29, 1903. 

Commencement sermon Sundayj June 7 i903 

Annual meeting of Trustees Monday, June 8, 1903 

Military exercises, 4 p. m Monday> June g> im \ 

llumni T* Celebrat, ° n ' 8 P * m M <*W, June 8, 1903. 

urnuJ 1 &7 ' \ ' Tuesday, June 9, 19tt3. 

Military exercises, 5 p. m Tue3day , j une 

Address before Literary Societies, 8 p. m .... Tuesday, June 9 1903 
Commencement Day Wednesday,; June 10, 1903^ 




THE LIBRARY 




^v4 



API 

T171 
.A22 

1901/02 

c.2 



"g 



^^. 



•MatM 






I 






W. M/IB/ltiA 

Polytechnic Institute. . 





CATALOGUE 



<>F THE 



J 




\\ 



ei 







\ 



V 



T 




c^ 




I 



.7 




I 




STATE COLLEGE 



FOR I'll K 



BENEFIT OF AGRICULTURE AND THE MECHANIC ARTS 



AUBURN, ALABAMA 



1902 



MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA 
THE BROWN PRINTING COMPANY, PRINTERS AND BINDERS 

1902 



TRUSTEES 



His Excellency, W. D. JELKS, President Ex-Officio. 

JNO. W. ABERCROMBIE, Superintendent of Education. .Ex-Officio. 

TERM EXPIRES, 1907. 

Jonathan Hakai.son . Montgomery, Ala. 

Thomas Williams. Wetumpka, Ala. 

J. A. Bilbro Gadsden, Ala. 

TERM EXPIRES, 1905. 

J. M Cabmichaei Ozark, Ala. 

W. K. Terry Birmingham, Ala. 

T. H. Frazer Mobile, Ala. 

I. F. PuaSEB Opelika, Ala. 

TERM EXPIRES, 1903. 

R. F. Ligon Montgomery, Ala. 

Tancred Betts Huntsville, Ala. 

Wm. C. Davis • Jasper, Ala. 

E. T. Glenn. Treasurer. J. H. Drake, M. D., Surgeon. 

R. W. Burton, Secretary. 




fill* 

A76 



*T 



6ARKSDALE 

FACULTY AND OFFICERS 



♦WILLIAM LeROY BROUN, M. A., LL. D., 

President. 

OTIS DAVID SMITH, M. A., LL. D., 

Acting President, and Professor of Mathematics. 

PATRICK HUGHES MELL, M. E., Ph. D., 
Professor of Botany and Geology. 

JAMES HENRY LANE, C. E., M. A., Ph. D., LL. D., 

Professor of Civil Engineering and Drawing. 

CHARLES COLEMAN THACH, M. A., 
Professor of English anu Political Economy. 

GEORGE PETR1E, M. A., Ph. D., 
Professor of History and Latin. 

BENNETT BATTLE ROSS, M. Sc, 
Professor of General and Agricultural Chemistry and State Chemist. 

JOHN JENKINS WILMORE, M. E., 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director of Laboratory. 

CHARLES ALLEN CARY, B. Sc, D. V. M.. 
Professor of Physiology and Veterinary Science. 

(a) EMERSON R. MILLER, Phaii. M., M. Sc, 
Professor ol Pharmacy. 

JOHN FREDERICK DUGGAR, M. Sc.; 
Professor of Agriculture. 

ARTHUR ST. CHARLES DUNSTAN, M. E., C. E., 
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Physics. 

JOHN EDWARD WIATT, M. A., 
Proiessor of Modern Languages. 

EDWIN MEAD WILCOX, M. A., Ph, D., 

Professor of Biology and Horticulture. 

BOLLING HALL CRENSHAW, M. E., 
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics. 



*Died January 23, 1902. 

(a) Absent on leave, at University in Germany. 




c3* 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 
james powell cocke southall, m. a., 

Associate Professor of Physics. 

BENJAMIN SWEAT PATRICK, E. & M. E., 

Commandant and Acting Professor of Military Science. 

ENOCH MARVIN MASON. M. Sc, 

Acting Professor of Pharmacy. 

ROBERT JEFFERSON TRAMMELL, C. E., 

Assistant Professor of Mechanic Arts. 

MICHAEL THOMAS FULLAN, M. Sc, 
Assistant Professor of Mechanic Arts. 

CLIFFORD LeROY HARE, M. Sc, 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

WILLIAM OSCAR SCROGGS, M. Sc, 
Assistant Librarian, and Assistant in English. 

WILLIAM WELCH HILL, E. & M. E., 
Assistant in Mechanic Arts. 

ARTHUR FLOURNOY JACKSON, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Sub-Freshman English and Mathematics. 

PAUL SHIELDS HALEY, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Civil Engineering and Drawing. 

JOHN TALBERT LETCHER, B. Sc, 
Assistant in English. 

(a) JAMES BAXTER JACKSON, B. Sc, 
Assistant in Chemistry. 

(&) MATTHEW SCOTT SLOAN, B. Sc, 

Assistant in Electrical Engineering. 

• JESSE WRIGHT BOYD, B. Sc, 

Assistant in History and Latin. 

( JAMES OLNEY GOGGANS, B. Sc, 

Assistant in Veterinary Science. 

HENRY EDWARD WERNER, B. Sc, 

Assistant in Mechanic Arts. 



(a) Appointed Jan. 2d, vice A. H. Mitchell, resigned. 

(b) Appointed Jan. 2d, vice K. E. Lindrose, resigned. 



COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY. 



Committee on Discipline, 
Professors Smith, Thach, Mell, Ross. 

Committee on Entrance Examination, 
Professors Smith, Thach, Petrie, Crenshaw. 

Committee on Examination of Special Students, 
Professors Wilmore, Dunstan, Miller. 

Committee on Public Lectures, 
Professors Petrie, Dunstan, Southall. 

Committee on Library, 
Professors Thach, Petrie, Wiatt. 

Committee on Athletics, 
Professors Ross, Mell, Dunstan, Thach. 

Superintendent of Grounds and Buildings, 
Professor Wilmore. 

Curator of Museum, 
Professor Mell. 

Secretary of Alumni Record, 
Professor Crenshaw. 











AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT 

STATION. 



COMMITTEE OF TRUSTEES ON EXPERIMENT STATION. 

J. M. Carmichael Ozark, Ala. 

Thomas Williams Wetumpka, Ala. 

Jonathan Haralson Montgomery, Ala. 

i 
STATION COUNCIL. 

♦Wm. LeRoy Broun President. 

°* a Smith • Acting President. 

P. H. Mell . . . . v . . . Director and Botanist. 

B. B. Ross m. i 

* Chemist. 

C ' A * Cary Veterinarian. 

J ' R DuGGAR; • Agriculturist. 

E. M. Wilcox Biologist and Horticulturist. 

J. T. Anderson Associate Chemist. 

ASSISTANTS. 

C ' L ' Hake -First Assistant Chemist. 

Thomas Bragg. ......; Second Assistant Cnemist> 

J. C. Phelps Tnird Assistant Chemist 

T. U. Culver ■. .... Superintendent of Farm. 

LARK • Assistant Agriculturist. 

LSTIX Assistant Horticulturist. 

G. F. Freeman Student Assistant to Director. 

M. J. LlDE. . r.1 , 

btudent Assistant to Director. 

OFFICER IN CHARGE OF FARMERS' INSTITUTES, 

Dr. C. A. Cary. 
•Died Jan. 23d, 1902. 



The Institute is a distinctive school of Science and 
its applications; being also the State College for the 
benefit of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts estab- 
lished by the State in 1872, by endowing it with the 
land-grant appropriation made by the U. S. Congress 
in 1862. 

The leading object of the Institute, in . conformity 
with the act of Congress and the acts of the State Legis- 
lature, is to teach the principles and applications of 

science. 

In its course of instruction it gives prominence to the 
sciences and their applications, especially to those that 
relate to agriculture and the mechanic arts; and at the 
same time the discipline and liberal education obtained 
by the study of language and other sciences are not neg- 
lected. 

All students are required to study the English lan- 
guage. The Latin, French and German languages are 
also taught, and opportunity for their study is offered 
to students in any course. 

The special and technical instruction given is thus 
based on a sound, general education. 

In its different courses of education, work of great 
value to the youth of the State is accomplished by fitting 
them by a thorough science-discipline, in which manual 
training in the lower classes is made a prominent fea- 
ture for the successful and honorable performance of 
the responsible duties of life. 

While every attention is given to the mental disci- 
pline of the students in endeavoring to train them to 
habits of accurate scientific thought, and thus to qualify 
them for the duties of life, their moral and Christian 
training will always constitute the prominent care and 
thought of the Faculty. The Institute thus endeavors 
to educate as well as instruct, to form character as well 
as give information of value. 



LABORATORIES AND FACILITIES FOR 

INSTRUCTION. 

The Institute now possesses facilities for giving 
laboratory instruction in applied science in the follow- 
ing departments: 

I. IX AGRICTI/fUUE AND HORTICULTURE. 

The farm contains 304 acres, and is supplied with 
illustrative specimens of stock of select varieties. 

The agricultural experiment station, established in 
connection with the College, where experiments and 
scientific investigations relating to agriculture are daily 
made, affords unusual opportunities to students to be- 
come familiar with agriculture, its defects and reme- 
dies. 

The students of agriculture accompany the professor 
in the field, garden, conservatory, stock-yard, etc., where 
lectures are delivered in the presence of the objects dis- 
missed, and during the year exercises in practical agri- 
culture of an educational character are given the stu- 
dents who enter upon this course of study. 

IL IN MECHANIC ARTS. 

™<* laboratory of mechanic arts is used as an aux- 
iliary ,n industrial education, and as a school of man- 
ual training in the arts that constitute the foundation 
>f various industrial pursuits. The work performed 
by the students is instructive in character, as in anv 
other laboratory, and the classes are taught in sections 
£ a senes of graded lessons under the supervS 
the professor. I n the lower classes of the InstUuJe 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



each student enters this school and is assigned three 
exercises a week, each exercise being two hours long. 

The object of this laboratory is not to teach a trade, 
but to educate, to discipline and train the eye and the 
hand, as well as the mind, and thus by associating 
manual and mental training, to educate thoroughly the 
student for the duties of life, whatever may he his voca- 
tion. There is no attempt to teach students special 
skill in constructing articles of commercial value, but 
all the exercises are systematically arranged and de- 
signed for purposes of education. 

The wood department is located in a commodious hall, 
90x50 feet, and is provided with a twenty-five horse- 
power Corlias engine, a planer, circular saw, band-saw, 
a buzz planer, a pattern maker's lathe, twenty-four 
stands, each with a lathe and a full set of tools, and 
thirty benches for carpenter work witli the tools requis- 
ite for construction. 

A brick building, 52xS7 feet, with two rooms, has 
been constructed especially for instruction in working 
iron. 

One room is equipped with twenty-four forges and 
tools requited for a forge department, and the other 
with a Oolliau cupola furnace, a core oven, a brass fur- 
nace, molding benches, foundry crane constructed by 
students, and special tools for use in a foundry. 

The forsre and foundry rooms are furnished witli a 
fan and exhauster, supplied with power from an engine 
constructed by the students in mechanic arts. 

The machine department occupies a brick building, 
30x100 feet, and is equipped with eleven engine lathes, 
one speed lathe, one 20-inch drill press, one 10-inch 
sensitive drill, one 16-inch simper, one 5-foot planer, one 
6-foot planer, one universal milling machine, a corun- 
dum tool grinder, a small emery grinder, a No. 1 Brown 






10 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

ft Bharpe universal grinding machine, a universal cutter 

# 

and reamer grinder, and a power hack saw. 

The chipping and filing department is arranged with 
benches, vises and tools for eighteen students. 

Tin* tool room is well supplied with special tools for 
use in instruction, including a machine for grinding 
twist drills. The rooms are lighted with electricity 
whenever necessary. 

III. IX PRACTICAL CHEMISTRY. 

The chemical laboratory is supplied with modern ap- 
paratus, and in its equipment affords excellent facilities 
for instruction in practical chemistry and for investi- 
gation. 

The investigations that are undertaken in this labor- 
atory by scientific experts, in connection with the work 
of the agricultural experiment station, are of especial 
value to advanced students, and afford them unusual 
opportunities to learn the methods of scientific research. 

The building contains a large general laboratory that 
accommodates sixty students, a special laboratory for 
Seniors that will accommodate thirty students, a lecture 
room with a capacity for one hundred seats, and nine 
other rooms, all appropriated to instruction and research 
i ii chemistrv. 

iv. in' electrical engineering. 

The electrical laboratory is well supplied with mod- 
ern appliances for instruction in electrical engineering 
It occupies three large rooms in the basement and is 
equipped with many line instruments of precision 

In addition to resistance boxes, bridges, condensers, 
galvanometers, dynamometers, wattmeters, photome- 
ters, and other laboratory instruments, the department 



±L 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 11 

is supplied with representatives of the best types of 
commercial electrical instruments from foreign and do- 
mestic makers. 

The laboratory is also equipped with apparatus for 
making breakdown tests of insulating materials, up to 
30,000 volts, also with spectroscopic apparatus for test- 
ing the quality of arc light carbons. 

The dynamos occupy a separate building and are oper- 
ated by a twenty- five horse power Atlas engine, and a 
sixty horse power Harrisburg standard engine. In this 
building are installed the following dynamos : 

Edison compound 12 Kilo-watt generator, Thompson- 
Houston 150 light 110 volt dynamo, Weston 150 volt 25 
ampere generator, Crocker- Wheeler one horse power 
motor, Ideal 3 phase alternator, Brush 6 arc light dy- 
namo with lamps, two Baxter street car motors, 20 horse 
power each (so connected as to be used as direct or alter- 
nating current motors or generators), one 5 horse power 
three phrase motor, one General Electric 20-horse power 
motor, one 10 light shunt dynamo, one Edison 3 Kilo- 
watt generator, one Stanley induction motor with con- 
densers, two bi-phase induction motors (built by stu- 
dents), one 9 light Thompson-Houston arc machine, one 
Fort Wayne 1 horse power alternating current motor, 
a number of transformers, etc., two phase alternator and 
500 volt 20 ampere generator, made by students. There 
is also in connection with this department at the ex- 
periment station, a ten horse power motor, made by 
students, which is operated by the 500 volt generator in 
the dynamo room. 

V. IN PHYSICS. 

The physical laboratory occupies two rooms, one of 
these being permanently darkened for experimental 
work in light. 







# 






12 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



It is equipped with numerous standard instruments 
of precision, such as verniers, micrometers, cathetom- 
eters, a horizontal comparator, a Kater's reversion 
pendulum, balances, etc., and a quantity of minor appa- 
ratus. 

Recently there has been added a concave grating spec- 
trograph, a large induction coil of 12 inch spark, and 
other apparatus of value. 

VI. IN MINERALOGY. 

This laboratory occupies a convenient room in the 
basement, and is provided with tables and appliances 
to accommodate thirty students, with an excellent col- 
lection of minerals. 

VII. IN BOTANY. 

In the work of the agricultural experiment station 
there is a botanical garden under the charge of the pro- 
fessor of botany; investigations in botany are given spe- 
cial attention, and opportunities are offered advanced 
students for practical work in a laboratory especially 
fitted with microscopes, tables, a dark room for photo- 
graphic work, and appliances needed for instruction 
and research. This department is provided with 
Auzoux's clastic models of seeds and flowers for teach- 
ing botany. 



VIII. IN BIOLOGY. 

The laboratory *>r plant morphology, histology, and 
pathology adjoins the lecture room of the professor 
and is well equipped with appliances for the investiga- 
tion of these subjects. 

A small laboratory and adjoining greenhouse are 
being thoroughly equipped for work in experimental 



■^ 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



13 



plant physiology and pathology. It is hoped that dur- 
ing the coming year excellent facilities may then be of- 
fered for the study of these objects. 

IX. IN ENGINEERING AND SURVEYING. 

The necessary apparatus for field work, including 
transits, levels, plane table, models of bridges, etc., is 
provided for the use of the students, and the customary 
exercises in the field are given. 

X. IN DRAWING. 

All students in the lower classes are required to take 
drawing, a study which tends to discipline the mind, as 
well as to train the eye and hand to accuracy of obser- 
vation and execution. A large, well-lighted drawing 
room, which will accommodate fifty students, is pro- 
vided with tables, lock-boxes, etc. 

XI. IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

The mechanical course has been extended to include 
experimental work in mechanical engineering. 

The apparatus available for this instruction is as fol- 
lows : A* 45-horse power Imperial Cross compound en- 
gine, specially arranged for experimental work, sup- 
plied with Wheeler surface condenser and Worthing- 
ton air pump and circulating pump, a 25-horse power 
Harris-Corliss engine, a 35-horse power Westinghouse 
engine, two 9-horse power engines constructed by stu- 
dents, the 100-horse power boiler belonging to the regu- 
lar power plant, a Deane duplex steam pump, a 4-horse 
power gasoline engine, an Ericsson hot air engine, a 
New York air pump, a Westinghouse air pump, four 
steam engine indicators, a separating calorimeter, 
thermometers, a pyrometer, scales, a standard steam 












14 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



gauge with apparatus for testing steam gauges, a Cros- 
by dead weight tester with weights for correcting the 
standard gauge, a 35,000-pound testing machine, a Hen- 
ning micrometer extensometer, and a Carpenter calori- 
meter with the necessary auxiliary apparatus for deter- 
mining the heating value of different kinds of coal. 

This work is now carried on in the lower story of the 
annex to the chemical laboratory. This room is 30x60 
feet in size, and was specially designed and fitted up 
for this purpose. A three-inch steam main has been laid 
from the boiler house, thus securing a steam supply in 
the building for all work requiring it. The work is 
thoroughly practical, and it is desired to extend it as 
rapidly as the funds available for the purchase of ap- 
paratus will allow. 



XII. 



IN PHYSIOLOGY AND VETERINARY SCIENCE. 



There has been constructed for the veterinary depart- 
ment a new and separate two-story building with nine 
rooms. It is provided with lecture room, office, work- 
ing and operating rooms for clinieal practice and 
museum with skeletons of the domestic animals for in- 
struction. Free clinics are given every Saturday for 
the benefit of the students in veterinary science. 

There is a separate dissecting room constructed with 
cement floor and north roof light especially for this de- 
partment. This Laboratory is used by the professor 
and students each afternoon for three months. 

XIII. IN PHARMACY. 

The laboratory of this department occupies the sec- 
ond floor of the annex to chemical laboratory, and is 
prov.de,. *Jth a sufficient supply of drugs and appa 
rjtjj, necessary for instruction in pharmaceutical 7Z 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



16 



The students work in the laboratory with the profes- 
sor, from five to eight hours, six days in the week. 
The facilities are increased as means are available. 



^ 



MILITARY TACTICS. 

Instruction in this department is given in conformity 
with the act of Congress. Students receive the benefit 
of regular military drill, and in addition the military 
system is used as a means of enforcing discipline and 
securing good order, promptness and regularity in the 
performance of academic duties. 

This department is supplied with cadet rifles and 
accoutrements for the corps. 






I 



16 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

COLLEGE BriLDIXOS. 

The frontispiece is a representation of the main College building. 
It is 100x71 feet, and contains forty-five rooms. This building is 
not used for dormitories for students, but is appropriated to pur- 
poses of instruction and investigation. 

It contains the lecture rooms and offices of the professors, labora- 
tories, library, museum, armory, etc. 

LANGDON HALL. 

This is a two-story building, 90x50 feet. The second story is the 

audience hall, used for commencement and other public occasions. 

The first story is appropriated to the laboratory of mechanic arts. 

THE CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

As shown on the opposite page this is a two-story structure, 40x60 

feet, with a rear projection, 35x60 feet, of one-story and basement, 

and contains eight rooms. The exterior is of pressed brick, with 

cut stone trimmings and terra cotta ornamentation. 

In the basement are ample accommodations for assaying and 
storage. 

The main laboratory will accommodate sixty students, and con- 
tains improved working tables, with water, gas and every necessary 
appliance for chemical work. 

The laboratory for advanced work in chemistry will accommodate 
thirty students and is equipped in the same manner. Adjoining this 
are two rooms which are used respectively as a balance room and 
a rocm for work with spectroscope, polariscope, etc. 

The second story contains a lecture room with seats and tablets 
for eighty students. Around the lecture room are cases containing 
crude and manufactured products, illustrating agricultural and 
mechanical chemistry, prominent subjects taught in the institution. 

ANNEX TO CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

This is a three-story brick building, containing rooms for phar- 
macy, mechanical engineering and drawing 
The Chemical Laboratory for the Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
on occupies a building 60x26 feet and is appropriated exclusively 
for chemical investigation and research, and not for instruction 



. 




QHEM1CAL LABORATORY, 



m 



HONOR ROLL FOR CONDUCT, 1902. 



The names of the following cadets, who have received no de- 
merits during the year, are placed upon the honor roll for good 
conduct: 



Hixon, C. B. 
Holt, J. E. 
Jackson, C. E. 
Nelson, A. B. 



Bonner, W. J. 
Crumpler, L. H. 
McLeod, H. 
Jackson, E. C. 



Allison, H. A. 
Campbell, B. M. 
Going, W. S. 
Greene, J. B. 
Hanby, E. K. 
Jackson, C. J. 
McAdory, I. S. 
Meredith, W. M. 



Burke, R. P. 
Chipley, D. 
Davis, H. E. 
Foss, G. B. 
Hill, G. B. 
Hudson, J. D. 
Hunt, F. E. 
Kauffman, R. 

2 



SUB-FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Rhodes, C. E. 
Wilson, W. S. 
Webb, T. J. 
Webb, E. F. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

McNeel, A. M. 
Owen, W. F. 
Sawyer, B. R. 
Steele, B. W. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Middleton, F. S. 
Newman, F. F. 
Robinson, J. L. 
ttiley, T. A. 
Rogers, C. M. A. 
Thomas, A. L. 
Wood, J. W. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Matson, T. H. 
Mitchell, J. H. 
Rigney, P. 
Rutledge, C. P. 
Thornton, W. L. 
Turnley, W. M. 
Yonge, H. M. 









m 




18 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



junior CLASS. 



Atkinson, F. C. 
Ellis, M. 
Collins, C. A. 
Dawson, R. G. 
Feagin, C. E. 
Hamilton, W. B. 
Herndon, D. T. 



Arnold, R. T. 
Bradford, K. 
Bragg, T. 
Conner, H. H. 
Eagar, W. H. 
Felton, L. M. 
Foy, J. D. 
Ha gler, W. H. 
Haley, P. s. 
Jackson, A. F. 
Jackson, J. B. 
Kahn, M. D. 
Kauffman, C. 



Kyser, J. A. 
Lide, M. J. 
Snedecor, G. W. 
Webb, J. 0. 
Willis, W. D. 
Yonge, J. E. D. 



SENIOR CLASS. 



Kiilebrew, E. S. 
Letcher, J. T. 
Lindrose, K. E. 
Noll, W. L. 
McCrary, W. D. 
McGehee, W. B. 
Parker, D. J. 
Pnelps, J. C. 
Stickle, H. S. 
Turpin, M. C. 
Werner, H. E. 
Whitfield, G. 
Williams, J. C. 




c 



GRADUATES IN 1901. 



CLASS OF 1901. 



• HONORS. 

Members of the Senior Class who attained distinction with a grade 
of 95 per cent, are Graduates with Highest Honor. Those who at- 
tained a distinction with a grade of 90 per cent, and less than 95, 
are Graduates with Honor. Those who attained less than 90 per 
cent, and more than 60 per cent, are Graduates. 



^ 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. 
GRADUATES. 

Robertson Tanner Arnold Florida 

Idaline Bell Lee 

Kenneth Bradford Montgomery 

Samuel Hamner Browne ........... • • • • • • • • Tuscaloosa 

Salmon Holmes Burns Lee 

David James Castleman Hale 

LeRoy Madison Felton South Carolina 

James Olney Goggans Tallapoosa 

Walter Lee Greene Lee 

William Hope Haigler Montgomery 

Michael Smith Harvey Lee 

Charles Henry Haynes Bullock 

Daniel Hagood Haynes Dallas 

Arber Samuel Hertz Georgia 

Robert Holland Hood ••• Jefferson 

Arthur Flournoy Jackson Georgia 

James Baxter Jackson Le€ 

Jefferson Franklin Jones • Sumter 

Claude Kauffman Mobile 

Bmmett Stephens Killebrew Dale 

William Reid Lancaster Lee 






I 



20 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



i f 



Walter Deems McCrary Lee 

William Boyd McGehee Montgomery 

Benjamin Baldwin Meriwether Montgomery 

Isaac Lenoir Moore Lee 

Merrill Hastings Moore Montgomery 

William Louis Noll Tennessee 

James Cochran Phelps Lee 

James Blackmon Powell Bullock 

Shepherd Harrison Roberts Montgomery 

Harvey Owen Sargent Franklin 

.Lyman Hall Shaw Sumter 

Henry Alexander Skeggs -.Morgan 

Matthew Scott Sloan , Mobile 

Holland McTyeire Smith Lee 

Louis Sternfeld . . . Montgomery 

Leonidas Wharton Cherokee 

Gaius Whitfield Marengo 

Jere Crawford Williams Lee 

John Rutledge Williams Jefferson 

Edward Houston Wills Lee 

GRADUATES WITH HONOR. 

Herschel Winston Bass gt ciair 

Thomas Bragg Lee 

Herschel Henry Conner Macon 

William Hamilton Eagar ..:.... Winston 

Eugene Flynn Enslen V.'. V.V.Jefferson 

John Drewry Foy Barbour 

Myron Daniel Kahn L 

Karl Edward Lindrose VVVVVVVVVV* .'.'.' Mississippi 

Dorsey Julian Parker Escambia 

Oscar Menderson Schloss Barbour 

John Hunt Skeggs „ 

_ „ M e Morgan 

Godfrey Rhodes Thomas « 

,, , __ bumter 

Manly Curry Turpin „. , , 

„ , Virginia 

Henry Edward Werner .. m 

. Texas 

GRADUATES WITH HIGHEST HONOR. 

Paul Shields Haley Walker 

John Talbert Letcher M 

Abram Hill Mitchell ° n 

Lee 



■ 



■1 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 21 

POST-GRADUATE DEGREE. 
MASTER OF SCIENCE. 

Idaline Bell Lee 

Emma Beall Culver Lee 

Charles Lewis Harold Escambia 

Mabel Heard Lee 

John William Jepson South Carolina 

Enoch Marvin Mason Conecuh 

James Richard Rutland Chambers 

Harvey Owen Sargent • . .Franklin 





L 



,•*> 



DISTINGUISHED STUDENTS. 



DISTINCTIONS. 



Students who receive a grade above 90 per cent, and less than 
95 in three studies in the Freshman class, in four in the Sopho- 
more class, in five in the Junior, and in six in the Senior, are dis- 
tinguished for excellence in scholarship, and are awarded Certifi- 
cates of Distinction. Those who receive a grade above 95 per cent. 
are awarded Certificates of Hignest Distinction. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

DISTINCTION. 

William Cruse Coles . Marshall 

James Browder Garber Hale 

William Bulger Hamilton Elmore 

Gaston Joel Lipscomb Marengo 

Walker Dorr Willis Florida 

HIGHEST DISTINCTION. 

Marvin Ellis Morgan 

James Allen Kyser , Da ilas 

Martin James Lide .Dallas 

Richard Blount Shepard Mobile 

George Waddell Snedecor .Jefferson 

John Eayres Davis Yonge ; .Florida 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

DISTINCTION. 

Rush Pearson Burke Montgomery 

Dudley Chipley Flmm 

Sidney Cornell Jefferson 

Howard Kills Davis Mobl]e 

Thomas Joseph Dowdell Montgomery 

George Bridges Poss Etowa]i 




■fl 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



23 



Roy Kauff man . Mobile 

Walter Joseph Knight Mobile 

William Lawson Thornton Talladega 

HIGHEST DISTINCTION. 

None. 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 

DISTINCTION. 

Julian Sidney Chambers Montgomery 

James Henderson Childs Georgia 

William Lawrence Dumas Mobile 

James Buchanan Green Crenshaw 

Chauncey Smith Joseph Montgomery 

John McDuffie t • • '• -Monroe 

Frederick Shealy Middleton Chambers 

Fenton Forest Newman Talladega 

HIGHEST DISTINCTION. 

Frederick Emanuel Geibel Montgomery 

John William Mcconnell Jefferson 

William Martin Shepard Mobile 

Berner Leigh Shi Georgia 

SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

DISTINCTION. 

T pft 

Ethel Julia Harwell 

Mollie Hal Hollifield : Lee 

Pike 
Herbert McLeod 

Sallie Fleming Ordway Tennessee 

M -. _.. .. Lauderdale 

Henry Sleeth Stickle " 




CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 



FOR SESSION OF 1901-1902. 



GRADUATE STUDENTS. 
(Residence in Alabama when State is not given.) 

^ f/y//e - Residence. 

Hem-hel Winston Bass St. Clair 

Idaline Bell Lee 

Jesse Wright Boyd Lee 

.Alary Wright Boyd. . . Lee 

Thomas Bragg # Lee 

Marion Lara Brown Georgia 

Emma Beall Culver Lee 

James Olney Goggans Tallapoosa 

Paul Shields Haley \_ .Walker 

Michael Smith Harvey Lee 

Arthur Flournoy Jackson Georgia 

James Baxter Jackson Lee 

Kate Meade Lane T ^ 

jjee 

John Talhert Letcher Macon 

Karl Edward Lindrose ../.'.'.'.'. ' Louisiana 

Frederick Greenville Matthews L ee 

Ahram Hill Mitchell Lee 

Augustus Young Napier Lee 

James Cochran Phelps L 

Matthew Scott Sloan . ' . '. Mobile 

Henry Edward Werner '.'.'.' Texag 

Edward Houston Wills ['" L 




■ 



^ 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 25 

undergraduate students, 
senior class. 

Oliver Hannibal Alford Marshall j I 

William Marvin Askew Georgia H 

Frederick Cornelius Atkinson Dale 

Charles Homer Billingsley . Elmore ■ 

Edward Lambeth Carroll Florida ■ 

William Cruse Coles . *. • Marshall , j • j 

Clyde Allen Collins Hale 

Alpheus Mallette Davis Florida 

Robert Geoghegan Dawson Montgomery 

Jesse Duncan Elliott Minnesota 

Marvin Ellis . . . . . Morgan 

James Douglas Farley I jee 

Clarence Eugene Feagin Bullock 

James Browder Garber . Hale 

Arthur Rodfer Gray • Florida 

Jeremiah Warren Gwin Jefferson 

William Houston Gwin • • • Jefferson 

William Bulger Hamilton Elmore ■ 

Clifton Duane LTaynie Lee ■ 

William Tillman Heard • • Lee 

Dallas Tabor Herndon Henry 

Mollie Hal Hollifield Lee 

Franklin Jerome Houston .Jefferson 

Collins James Johnson Missouri 

Morris Ketchum ^ York . I 

Howard Malcolm Kilpatrick Georgia H 

Martin James Lide Dallas 

Gaston Joel Lipscomb Marengo j 

Earle Irwin McBryde AN ll( ^ x ■ 

Thomas Michael McCarroll Florida ■ 

Henry Bigham Park Georgia ■ 

Douglass Welles Peabody Illinois 












26 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

George Clement Sequiera Nicaragua 

Brady Wilkinson Steele Autauga 

Richard Blount Shepard Mobile 

Enrico Alfonso Washington .Georgia 

John Osceola Webb Coosa 

Walker Dorr Willis Florida 

John E-.iyres Davis Yonge Florida 

JUNIOR CLASS.. 

Albert Miner Avery . . Florida 

Marshall Leonard Bize Georgia 

James Victor Blackwell Calhoun 

Stewart Dixon Brown Henry 

fRyland Crews Bryant Jefferson 

Bush Pearson Burke Montgomery 

Robert Wright Cabaniss Jefferson 

Thomas Arthur Caddell Etowah 

f William Julius James Chase. Georgia 

Dudley Chinlev ™ ^ 

vtn\u ' * * ' Florida 

>> imam Hudmon Cooper Lee 

Sidney Cornell '* V. V/. Jefferson 

( buries Sanders Culver t 

Howard Ellis Davis . . . , \ \ " \ [ ] \ ',[ } [ [ \ ' ' ;. ' ; ] ' [ \ ^ 

Wi ham Watson Dam MoWle 

V HI .am Wert Dinsmore M 

I homas Joseph Dowdell Montgomery 

tWffliam Eugene Finch ......... fV rida 

George Bridges Fobs Etowah 

George Fouche Freeman .'.".Cherokee 

i;*^ Madison 

earnest Cecil Haynie 

Hell George Hazard n',\. 

HenrvHiden Calhoun 

George Bloise Hill V. if* e f ° n 

Wilhurn Hill . ' ; Talladega 

Etowah 

t Not hi full standing. 






Alabama Polytechnic Institute. ' 27 

Alexander Grice Horn ... Sumter 

James Daughtry Hudson Georgia 

Roy Kauffman . . . . Mobile 

Walter Joseph Knight • • -Mobile 

George Duncan Lesesne Mobile 

Percy McLean Marshall Georgia 

Winfield Scott Martin Jefferson 

John VanValkenburg Matthews Madison 

Robert Peyton Mims * Jefferson 

John Harris Mitchell . , Georgia 

Thomas William Morgan Jefferson 

Frank Elmer Miller Calhoun 

Sallie Fleming Ordway Tennessee 

James Porter Paterson Montgomery 

f David Philips Pruett Bullock 

Wallace Powell Pruitt • -Lowndes 

f George Daniel Handle • • Jefferson 

John Patrick Rembert Mississippi 

Paul Rigney Madison ^ 

William Richard Rison . . . . Madison 

Tod Hewitt Roberts Jefferson 

Carl Robinson Tallapoosa 

William Watson Rutland Chambers 

Clifford Philip Rutledge Lee 

Hans Schmidt Jefferson . 

John Rice Searcy Conecuh I 

Walter Otey Shivers Perr ^ j 

Edmund Rhett Taber .... . Montgomery j 

Edward Taylor ..Marengo 

Louis Earle Thornton Florida 

William Lawson Thornton Talladega 

Holmes Fielding Troutman • • • Georgia 

Filo Harris Turner .•• ...Florida 

William Micou Turnley Elmore 

Joseph Dorrah Walker • Jefferson 

Henry Matthew Yonge Honda 

f Not in full standing. 



28 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 






SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Henry Alexander Allison Sumter 

William Leroy Alston South Carolina 

John Shillman Arnold Florida 

Frank Gordon Bell Lee 

John Ambrose Beckham Lee 

William Arthur Branan Georgia 

Jefferson Edward Brown Jefferson 

Andrew Duke Cameron Macon 

f Borden Montgomery Campbell Greene 

Emmett Tulane Camp Etowah 

Julian Sidney Chambers Montgomery 

Alan Armistead Chester New York 

James Henderson Childs Georgia 

Victor Hugo Clements Limestone 

William Shapard Dowdell Lee 

William Lawrence Dumas Mobile 

George Dunglingson '/.. Talladega 

Verlie Boy Emm* Jefferson 

Devotie Glover Ewing .Lowndes 

Edwin Washington Ewing Lowndes 

Clarence Evelyn Field Jefferson 

Walter Summerville Going Jefferson 

Jarne* Buchanan Green . . .'.Crenshaw 

Ieyinan Hagedorn Geor ^ a 

Leonard Park Hall Jefferson 

W alter Leonidas Harwell j ^ 

Guy David Hawkins .' .' [[ [ [',[j e&er ^ u 

TJohn David Hudson T 

Charles Jefferson Jackson [[[.]] ] [ [ Montgomery 

Donald Van de Water Jenkins ^eg» 

Walter Wier Johnston Calno * n 

Allen Green Jone, Dallas 

Hilary Boston Jones Washington 

Chauncey Smith Joseph Montgomery 

t Not in full standing. 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 29 

Isham Kimbell Clark 

Frank Ragan King Jackson 

Edward Philip Lacey Jefferson 

Harry Thomas Landrum Jefferson 

Tracy Lay Etowah 

Henry Richard Lurcher Mobile 

Isaac Sadler Mc Adory Jefferson 

John William McConnell Jefferson 

John McDuffie Monroe 

Henry McDonnell Madison 

Thomas Pettus McElderry Talladega 

William Hugh McEniry .Jefferson 

William Monroe Meredith Greene 

Arthur Wilhelm Merkel Jefferson 

Frederick Shealy Middleton Chambers 

William Pittman Moon Coosa 

Lee Penn Montgomery Lee 

Edward Owen Perry • • .Georgia 

t Anderson Petrinovich • • • • Mobile 

Forney Renf ro kee 

Thomas Shepard Roche Mobile 

James Lon Robinson Jefferson 

Charles McPherson Rogers Sumter 

James Emmet Seale Sumter 

William Martin Shepard Mobile 

Berner Leigh Shi ..•• Georgia 

Washington Irving Shi • Georgia 

Solomon Kauffman Simon • • Marengo 

fJohn Floyd Smith Calhoun 

Zachary Pope Smith • • • • .Jefferson 

Paul Stewart Jefferson 

Joseph Churchill Strong Mobile 

John Randolph St. John M °bile 

Albert Lee Thomas « Lee 

f Not in full standing. 















30 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

r 

Thornton Albert Ward Lee 

William Francis Ward Lee 

f Francis Hobbs Watson Dallas 

William Clifford Wear Lee 

Robert Eubank Williams Jefferson 

John Mayer Wilson Clark 

William Mason Wilson Etowah 

Cullen Haddley Wimberly Sumter 

John Washington Wood Jefferson 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Hiram Victor Arnold Florida 

Eric Alsobrook Lee 

Franklin King Beck Wilcox 

Frederick Rudolph Bell Lee 

Theodore Chesbro Bowling Washington 

James Seaborn Boyd Montgomery 

Thomas Cobb Bradford Lee 

Samuel Davis Brown Georgia 

Sylvanus Burney Chambers 

Dugald Herbert Carmiehael Jefferson 

f Frank Furness Cawthon ... Dallas 

Lambert Alexander Chambliss Autauga 

Lemuel Jackson Cobb .'.Cherokee 

Lynn Lewis Conner Macon 

Balius Pinckney Cooper '. Washington 

Robert Cummins Dallas 

l^dward James Duncan \\\\\\ [ \ '. Ta'liapoosa 

Robert Lee Ellis Aut 

James Chester Elmer . .. Mississippi 

^f r ^T^f linger Ma ^on 

fClaud Belle Etheredge Dalla 

Willis Marone Etheridge \ . \\\\\\\\ V///^^ 

Frank Trimble Evans . r 

Bertram Ezekiel .... Georgia 

• Butler 

f Not in full standing. 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 31 

Edgar Earl Ferrell Greene 

f John Heggie Findlay Hale 

Welham Humphrey Foy Barbour 

Mither William Francis .Randolph 

f Benjamin Shields Gilmer Choctaw 

Frank Lovell Gonce Tennessee 

Edward Alexander Graham Autauga 

Edward Servanios Hitch Georgia 

f James Elliott Holt . . Russell 

Frank Parkinson Howard Macon 

Percy Wilbur Hudson Lee 

Frank Paul Hurt Jackson 

Charles Edwin Jackson • . Madison 

George Wallace Jackson Lee 

Frederick McClendon Jenkins Georgia 

Earl Eugene Jenks Mobile 

Arthur Dean Jones • • ; • • ^^ e 

Earl Kauffman ......../ .Mobile 

Albert Roy Killebrew Dale 

Bertram Joseph Lane Tall dega 

fMcCloy Harding Martin .. Lee 

Coke Smith Matthews , • Jefferson 

Charles Whitaker May • • • • • Russell 

George Elisha McCord Jefferson 

Richard McCulloh Louisiana 

Claude Cooper McLean Covington 

Louis Walton Montgomery Lee 

Harry Redwood Murray Mobile 

Cicero Lewis Nelson • • Baldwin 

John Haygood Paterson • • • • Montgomery 

Wert Horace Peace • • • • -Jefferson 

John Henry Peebles Limestone 

Monroe Thomas Penn Lee 

I^nry Clarence Perkins Barbour 

f Not in full standing. 










32 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

John Ross Philips St. Clair 

George Wallace Poste.il Jefferson 

John* Henry Powell Lee 

Marshall (lowan Price Marengo 

Francis Esten Purifoy Wilcox 

Frank Bellamy Rutledge Lee 

Robert Hyde Sanders . .. Hale 

Walter Robert Samford Lee 

Batt Lockard Spain Texas 

Linwood Seale '. Sumter 

Marvin Pearce Summers Lea 

G rover Cleveland Thompson Macon 

John Edward Thigpen Lowndes 

Henry Howard Thornton Talladega 

William Biggers Tucker Lee 

Perry Williams Turner ... . . .Colbert 

Charles Spurgeon Waldrop Jefferson 

Walter Van Weatherby Mississippi 

Elbert Pain Webb Cherokee 

Fletcher Gordon Webb Lee 

James Samuel Webb ' Lee 

Samuel Borders Wilson '. . . . V. TaHadeo^a 

, John Douglas Wilkins Marengo 

•Edward Louis Wright L * e 

Oliver Earle Young gumter 

SPECIAL AND IRREGULAR STUDENTS. 
Abbreviations: Ph-Pharmacy; E. & M. E.-Electrical and Mechan- 
ical Engineering; C.-Chemistry; Ag.-Agriculture; C E -Civil 

Engineering; Mech. A.-Mechanic Arts; E . E.-Electrical En^in- 
eering. ° 

Bessie Susan Alvis T 

• Lee 

Ralph Calloway Armstrong . . Ph Lc 

Robert Trammell Babgy C. E Lee 

Martin Vanburen Beason . . . Mech. A St Clair 

Herman Davidson Blake. . . Mech. A. ......... . Florida 

* Deceased. 




m 






Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 33 

Hyman Blumberg Chambers 

William Bonner E. & M. E Wilcox 

Marvin Fitzpatrick Boykin Lee 

Charles Franklin Bradshaw Randolph 

William Jefferson Bruister. . .Ag Choctaw 

Frank Barnard Clark Mobile 

Willis Gaylord Clark . . . . E. & M. E Michigan 

William Bather Coleman . . . . C. E Colbert 

Henry Denegre Jefferson 

Woodson Lea Ennk Ag Sumter 

Arthur Fincher Ph Lee 

James William Flanagan Ph Lee 

Daisy Douglas Foster Lee 

Marcus Luculus Foster E. E Etowah 

William Alexander Frazer. . . Ph Lee 

Charles Williams Gonce Tennessee 

Alexander Hamilton Green ...... Florida 

Kernon Hugh Gaines Chambers 

Leonard Graham Gresham . Mech. A. Autauga 

James Coulson Harper C. E Mississippi 

Ethel Julia Harwell . . . • • • Lee 

Robert Hinton Hogg Georgia 

William Dana Hubbard . . E. & M. E Dallas 

Mell Frazer Jackson . . .Ph tee 

John Sandford Jewett Ph Florida 

William Micou Jordan ...... Ph Elmore 

Walter Maurice Jones- 
Williams EL E Lee 

William Jackson Marsh. . . .Ph Lee 

Allen Davis McLain Ph Lee 

Herbert McLeod Ph Crensba.w 

Allen Massilon McNeel . . . E. & M, E Montgomery 

George Newburg Montgomery Mobile 

Jabez Curry Nelson C. E Jefferson 

3 










34 ALABAMA Polytechnic Institute. 

Fenton Forest Newman Talladega 

Louis Milton Noll Ph Jeffenson 

Albert Welman Pratt C. Madison 

Laurens Walter Pierce. ..E. & M. E Elmore 

John Vincent Pierson C Perry 

Oscar Early Rutland Mech. A Lee 

William Harvey Robertson . . . . Ph Jackson 

Benjamin Riley Sawyer Ph Calhoun 

Edward Ramsey Scott Tennessee 

Fletcher Porter Sewell Ag Cherokee 

Rufus Pew Shuptrine Ph Dallas 

Julian Cassius Smith E. & M. E .Macon 

Hunter Molton Smith E. E Jefferson 

Robert Ware Sistrunk Elmore 

Quinton Sorrell C Talladega 

Cecil Pitts Stowe Ph Lee 

Benjamin Walton Taylor ... .Jefferson 

Roy Lee Thornton Ph Bullock 

James Feagin Tompkins. . . . Ag .Lee 

Alma Cole Tompkins Lee 

Conrad Lee Thompson Mobile 

James Cooper Usrey Ph Jefferson 

Fletcher Peavey Whatley . . Mech. A Lee 

Judson Franklin Webb. . . . C. E Lee 

St. John Wilson Mobile 

Walter Rivers Whitman ..... Ph [ Lee 

Abner Melvin Windham Ph Dale 

SUB-FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Leslie Sheldon Abercrombie Macon 

Leo Abraham Montgomery 

Thomas Eaton Alexander Marengo 

Ignacio Alfonso * * Cu £ a 

Otis DeWitt Alsobrook Lee 

Thomas Henry Bass Butler 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 35 

Walter Pendleton Bass . Butler 

Conner Benbow Crenshaw 

Robert Leroy Bowling Washington 

Edwin Matherson Bragg Lee 

Edward Crawford Florida 

Charles Edward Crawford Talladega 

Benjamin Harris Cross Lee 

James Lile Cross Lee 

Shelby Montgomery Cullom Jefferson 

Benjamin Cropp Davis Mobile 

John Carter Detwiler . Montgomery 

Walter Dean . Cullman 

Pedro Echezabal Cuba 

George Hardaway Frazer Lee 

Raphael Garcia Cuba 

Edward Daniel Gates . Dallas 

Raymond David Gillespie Jefferson 

Howard Wilson Going . . . . . Jefferson 

William Minthon Goodger v . . Perry 

Carlos Houghton Cuba 

Frank Brown Johnston Dallas 

Washington Cleveland Jones • • . Pike 

Clyde White Jones i Bibb 

Carter Wallace King Florida 

Michael King • • • .Florida 

Cornelius Malone Greene 

Ulysses Claud Martin Dallas 

Adalberto Masvidal Cuba 

John Quarterman McCaskill Florida 

Benjamin McMillan Mobile 

Frederick Augustus Miller Covington 

David Minge • Hale 

William Leroy Mitchell Lee 

Vernon Moore Hale 

John Bobbins Nettles Monroe 












36 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

James Hudson Otey — . Perry 

Thomas Henry Pattison Lee 

William Britain Powledge Lee 

Jesse Henry Pryor Perry 

Claude Hughes Scheiffelin Mobile 

Edward Cooper Smith Georgia 

Guy Clarence Stuart .. Washington 

Robert Wilson Trimble Jefferson 

Charles Winston Thompson Macon 

Carl Venable Jefferson 

Ross Myron Vest Jefferson 

James Pennington Vickers . . . Clark 

Joaquin Nilo Vila Cuba 

Emique Vila .Cuba 

Lee Anderson West Perrv 

Willis Carter W T est Perry 

Dinnis Timothy Williamson . . . . . Covington 

SUMMARY. 

( rraduate Students [ 22 

Senior Class 39 

Junior Class - 

feophomore Class 77 

Freshman Class . ' ['- ^ 

Special and Irregular Students ........ 65 

Total in College Classes U8 

Sub-Freshman Class [ 58 

Total ^ 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



37 



NUMBER OF STUDENTS IN EACH SUBJECT OF STUDY. 



English 338 

History 227 

French 31 

German 38 

Latin 101 

Mental Science 8 

Political Economy .... 33 

Mathematics 333 

Chemistry 156 

Chemical Laboratory . . 146 

Agriculture 97 

Physics 216 

Botany 109 

Horticulture 17 



Geology 43 

Civil Engineering .... 29 

Electrical Engineering. 57 

Mechanical Engineer'g. 55 

Biology 12 

• 

Drawing 293 

Mechanic Arts 267 

Military Department .. 378 

Mineralogy 21 

Physical Laboratory. . . 46 

Physiology 83 

Veterinary Science ... 17 

Pharmacy 41 

Bacteriology 15 



RESIDENCE BY STATES. 



333 
24 
23 

6 
4 



Alabama 

Georgia 

Florida 

Cuba 

Mississippi 

Tennessee 

Louisiana * 

2 

].......... 1 

1 

.......... 1 



Texas . . 
Missouri 
Michigan 
Illinois . . 



New York •••• • • • • • 2 

1 

1 

1 



Nicaragua 
Minnesota .... 
South Carolina 



406 












I 



MILITARY ORGANIZATION. 



1901-1902. 



President, 
*W. L. BROUN. 

Acting President, 
0. D. SMITH. 

Commandant, 
COL. B. S. PATRICK. 

Surgeon, 
J. H. DRAKE. 

Battalion Staff: 

Cadet Captain W. D. Willis, Assistant to Commandant. 
Cadet First Lieutenant, D. W. Peabody, Adjutant. 
Cadet Captain C. A. Collins, Quartermaster. 
. Cadet First Lieutenant M. Ketchum, Assistant Adjutant. 
Cadet Sergeant W. J. Knight, Sergeant Major. 
Cadet Sergeant L. E. Thornton, Quartermaster Sergeant. 

Cadet Captains: 

1. J. E. D. Yonge. 3. W. C. Coles. 

2. J. B. Garber. 4. H. B. Park. 

Cadet First Lieutenants: 

1. J. D. Farley. 5. D. T. Herndon. 

2. F. J. Houston. 6 . B . W. Steele 

3. J. O. Webb. 7. E. A. Washington. 

4. W. B. Hamilton. 8. E. I. McBryde. 

Cadet Second Lieutenant: 

1. E. L. Carroll. * 

Cadet First Sergeants: 
1. H. E. Davis. 3 . D . Chipley 

, 2 - W - W - Davis - 4. H. M. Yonge. 

♦Died January 23, 1902. 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



39 



Cadet Sergeants: 



1. T. J. Dowdell. 

2. A. M. Avery. 

3. P. M. Marshall. 

4. W. W. Rutland. 

5. J. H. Mitchell. 

6. W. L. Thornton. 

7. E. Taylor. 

8. W. W. Dinsmore. 

9. J. D. Walker. 



1. B. L. Shi. 

2. J. H. Childs. 

3. J. McDuffie. 

4. P. S. Middleton. 

5. W. L. Dumas. 

6. C. S. Joseph. 

7. W. M. Wilson. 

8. J. L. Robinson. 



10. G. B. Hill, 

(Color Sergeant.) 

11. P. Rigney. 

12. R. P. Burke. 

13. W. M. Turnley. 

14. G. F. Freeman. 

15. T. A. Caddell. 

16. E. C. Haynie. 

17. H. F. Troutman. 



Cadet Corporals 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 



T. Lay. 

J. S. Chambers. 
W. S. Going. 
C . J . Jackson . 
T. P. McElderry. 
H. R. Luscher. 
A. G. Jones. 
W. L. Harwell. 



R. C. Armstrong. 
H.V.Arnold. 
F. C. Atkinson. 
A. M. Avery. 

F. G. Bell. 
H. Blumberg. 
L. J. Cobb. 
M. Ellis. 

V. R. Emrick. 

G. H. Frazer. 
W. L. Harwell. 
G. D. Hawkins. 



THE A. P. I. CADET BAND. 
M. Thomas Fullan, Bandmaster. 
J. C. Harper, Principal Musician. 

H. Hagedorn. 



J. D. Hudson. 
A. W. Merkel. 
G. JST- Montgomery. 
J. P. Rembert. 
G. C. Sequiera. 
S. K. Simon. 
J. R. St. John. 
E. R. Taber. 
A. L. Thomas. 
A. Petrinovich. 
W. V. Weatherby. 




Cadets of the graduating class who were reported to the Adjutant 
General, U. S. Army, for publication in the "Official Army Register 
as having ranked highest in the Military Department: 

" 1889 189 °- 

«J*J P. D. Milstead. 

A. St. Dunstan. * 

B. H. Crenshaw. J. W. Bivins. 
A. J. Burr. G.W.Emory. 




%..'• 













II 



I I 



40 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



1891. 

L. E. Baker. 
C. C. Johnson. 
F. J. Bivins. 

1892. 

H. F. Dobbin. 
A. L. Jones. 
C. L. Brown. 

1893. 

Joel Dumas. 
C. H. Smith. 
J. F. Webb. 

1894. 

C. S. Andrews. 
P. P. McKeown. 
R. T. Dorsey. 

1895. 

S. L. Coleman. 
H. H. Smith. 
L. B. Gammon. 

A. L. Alexander. 
W. L. Fleming. 



1897. 

P. G. Clark. 
G. M. Holley. 
G. N. Mitcham. 

1898. 

A. H. Clark. 

A. McB. Ransom. 

John Haralson. 

1899. 

I. F. McDonnell. 
A. H. Feagin. 
T. W. Wert. 

1900. 

E.M . Mason. 
H. P. Powell. 
C. W. Nixon. 

1901. 

A. F. Jackson. 
J. D. Foy. 
P. S. Haley. 

1896. 

W. M. Williams. 



. 



^1 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 41 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

All applicants for admission should present testi- 
monials of good moral character, and those who come 
from other colleges must present certificates of honor- 
able discharge. 

To enter the Freshman class the applicant must be 
not less than fifteen years of age, and should be qualified 
to pass a satisfactory examination on the following sub- 
jects : 

1. Geography and History of the United States. 

2. English — (a) English grammar as contained in 
any standard text, (b) An examination upon sen- 
tences containing incorrect English, (c) A composi- 
tion giving evidence of satisfactory proficiency in spell- 
ing, punctuation, grammar, and division into para- 
graphs. 

(a) Reading, The composition of 3902 will be upon 
subjects drawn from one or more of the following works 
in English Literature: (1) Hughes's Tom Brown at 
lluqby; (2) Southey's Life of Nelson; (3) Shakes- 
peare'^ JuHm Caesar; (4) Longfellow's Erangeline; 
(5) Scott's Ivanhoe; (0) Shakespeare's Merchant of 
Yenice; (7) Irving^ Sketch Book; (8) Macaulay's 
Essay 'on Milton; (9) Scott's Mamiion; (10) Dick- 
ens's David Gopperftcld. 

The candidate will be required to present evidence of 
a general knowledge of the subject matter, and to an- 
swer simple questions on the lives of the authors. This 
part of the examination is intended only to test a gen- 
eral knowledge of the substance of the books. 

(b) Study and Practice. This part of the examina- 
tion presupposes.the thorough study of the style of the 
work, and will be upon Julius Vaesar and the Essay 
on Milton. 







42 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 










Preparation and examinatvon on these works will be 
necessary before the student is classed as regular in any 
course. 

3. Mathematics — (a) Arithmetic, including funda- 
mental operations!; common and decimal fractions; de- 
nominate numbers; the metric system; percentage, in- 
cluding interest and discount ; proportion. ( b ) Algebra 
to quadratic equations; especial preparation is urged in 
fundamental operations, factoring, multiples, divisors 
and fractions; two books of geometry. 

4. Those applicants who desire to continue the study 
of Latin should be qualified to pass a satisfactory ex- 
amination in Latin grammar and the first two books of 
Caesar, in addition to the above subjects. 

In pronouncing Latin it is recommended that a be pronounced as 
in father, a as the a in Cuba;~e as in prey; e as in men; t as in ma- 
chine, i as in cigar; o as in old; o as in obey; u as in rule; u as in 
full; j as y in yard; c, always as k in king; g always as g in get. 

For admission to the higher classes, students should 
be prepared to stand satisfactory examination in all 
of the studies of the lower classes, as shown in the course 
of study. Students applying for admission to the sopho- 
more class will be examined in mathematics through 
quadratic equations and logarithms in Algebra, and on 
seven books in geometry. Where opportunity has not 
been offered to pursue special studies required at this 
College, the system of equivalents will be adopted, and 
studies which denote an equivalent amount of discipline 
and training will be accepted as satisfactory. But if not 
prepared to pass an examination in history and chem- 
istry at the time of application, the applicant will be re- 
quired before graduation to- pa* a satisfactory exami- 
nation on these subjects. 







Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



43 



It is absolutely essential that students who hope to 
succeed should be well grounded in Arithmetic, Algebra, 
and Geometry. 

A working knowledge of the metric system should also 
be obtained. 

ADMISSION ON CERTIFICATE. 

Appicants will be admitted without examination on presenting a 
certificate from any of the certificate schools named herein. 

The following educational institutions having made application to 
be correlated to this College and having presented an approved 
course of study, are hereby declared to be certificate schools, ana 
are granted the privilege set forth in the following: 

"Students from certificate schools will be admitted to the fresh- 
" man class without examination upon the certificate of the presi- 
dent or principal showing definitely that such students have 
"completed satisfactorily all the studies required for admission, as 
"stated in the catalogue and are otherwise admissible." 

The privilege of admitting students of the Sophomore class on 
certificate will be granted only to those approved schools that have 
had a continuous existence for five years or more and have pre- 
viously had pupils admitted to that class without conditions. 

The following form of certificate will be used: 

I hereby certify that A , B has attended the 

{name the school or academy) for years and has studied 

the following subjects: 

in History (name the books) 

in English..... • (name the books) 

in Algebra. . (state amount accomplished) 

in Geometry ( state amount accomplished) 

in Latin....'.'.'.'....... • ^ state books r6ad) 

and having passed a satisfactory examination on these subjects as 

required in the Catalogue for admission to the • • -class, 

I recommend him for the same. 

Admission by certificate is regarded as provisional. 

That is though admitted to the class for which, the certificate 
calls, the aoplicant may be required to take special examination 
in any subject in which his preparation proves unsatisfactory, or, 
after a fair trial, he may be dropped to a lower class, if he fails to 
maintain standing in the class to which he may be admitted. 












44 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

» 

CERTIFICATE SCHOOLS. 

University Military School, Mobile J. D. Wright. 

Verner Military Institute, Tuscaloosa W. H. Verner. 

University School, Montgomery J. M. Starke. 

Mt. Willing High School, Mt. Willing J. Knight. 

State Normal School, Jacksonville. C. W. Daugette. 

Male Academy, Huntsville F. Puryear. 

Furman Academy, Livingston L. A. Cockrell. 

High School, Opelika J. M. Smallwood. 

University Military School, Clanton E. Y. McMorries. 

Eighth District Agricultural School, Athens M. K. Clements. 

Sixth District Agricultural School, Hamilton G. A. Holley. 

Eutaw Male Academy, Eutaw . . H. C. Horton. 

Boys' High School, Anniston H. C. Gunnels. 

Taylor's School, Birmingham . . W. P. Taylor. 

University High School, Birmingham. . I. J. White, M. B. Dickinson. 

Fourth District Agricultural School, Sylacauga A. G. Seay. 

Gaylesville High School John R. Ray. 

Carrollton Academy l. V. Rosser. 

Ninth District Agricultural School, Blountsville J! A. B. Lovett. 

Gadsden High School I. W. Hill. 

Boyd High School, Ramer B. H. Boyd. 

Dadeville High School j. D . La ne. 

Prattville High School A . w . Holstun. 

Eufaula High School F> L . McCoy. 

Union Springs High School j. M . Sanders. 

Montgomery High School c L . Floyd. 

Calera Academy C.C. Slaton. 

Southern Agricultural School, Abbeville J. B. Murphy. 

Barnes's School, Montgomery E# R> Bames * 

Jackson Agricultural School j B Murphy. 

Spring Lake School w c Griggs ' 

Pensacola Classical School H C Armstrong 

Eufaula District Academy ; . . R . E Brookg ; 

ADMISSION OF YOUNG WOMEN. 

The privilege of becoming students in this college is 
granted by the Trustees to young women of mature mind 
and character, on the following conditions: 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



45 



The applicant must be seventeen years of age, and if a 
candidate for a degree, be able to pass a satisfactory ex- 
amination in each of the four subjects as named below. 

If the applicant is a candidate for admission as a 
special or irregular student, she must be able to pass a 
satisfactory examination in two of the subjects named, 
and may be admitted at an age less than seventeen, with 
a resident of Auburn acting as guardian, if application 
is approved by the Faculty. 

(a) In English — Proficiency in spelling and punctuation; Gram- 
mar (Lock wood-Whitney) ; Rhetoric (Lockwood's Lessons and Car- 
penter's Rhetoric); Scudder's Masterpieces of American Literature; 
Syie's From Milton to Tennyson. 

For requirements in reading in literature see page 41. 

(b) In History — Macy's Our Government; Chambers's History of 
the United States; Myers's General History. 

(c) In Mathematics— Arithmetic; Algebra, including quadratic 
equations, logarithms and series; Plane and Solid Geometry; Plane 
and Spherical Trigonometry, as in Wentworth. 

(d) In Latin— Grammar, including the forms and syntax; Jones's 
Latin Prose Composition; translation of selections from Caesar, 
Nepos, Virgil, Cicero's Orations, Cicero's Letters, or the equivalent. 

The equivalents of these subjects, as in above text-books, may be 

substituted. 

Botany will constitute a required part of the general course for 
young women who are candidates for a degree. 

When admitted, upon complying with the conditions above stated, 
they may enter upon the study of any subject taught in the College 
and join any class, for which, upon examination, they may be found 
qualified. The only condition imposed will be that they engage in 
earnest study, and attend the exercises regularly. They will board 
in the town with private families and attend college only at the 
hours of their exercises. 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS. 

Entrance examinations will be held on Wednesday, 
the 10th of September, the day on which the session 
opens. Candidates will also be examined during the 
session, when application is made for admission. 



1 












44 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

certificate schools. 

University Military School, Mobile J. D. Wright. 

Verner Military Institute, Tuscaloosa W. H. Verner. 

University School, Montgomery J. M. Starke. 

Mt. Willing High School, Mt. Willing J. Knight. 

State Normal School, Jacksonville C. W. Daugette. 

Male Academy, Huntsville F. Puryear. 

Furman Academy, Livingston L. A. Cockrell. 

High School, Opelika J. M. Smallwood. 

University Military School, Clanton E. Y. McMorries. 

Eighth District Agricultural School, Athens. M. K. Clements. 

Sixth District Agricultural School, Hamilton G. A. Holley. 

Eutaw Male Academy, Eutaw H. C. Horton. 

Boys' High School, Anniston H. C. Gunnels. 

Taylor's School, Birmingham w. P. Taylor. 

University High School, Birmingham. . I. J. White, M. B. Dickinson. 

Fourth District Agricultural School, Sylacauga A. G. Seay. 

Gaylesville High School John R. Ray. 

Carrollton Academy . ...L. V. Rosser. 

Ninth District Agricultural School, Blountsville j; A. B. Lovett. 

Gadsden High School I. W. Hill. 

Boyd High School, Ramer B. H. Boyd. 

Dadeville High School j. D . La ne. 

Prattville High School A . w . Rolstun. 

Eufaula High School P L McCoy. 

Union Springs High School j. M . Sanders. 

Montgomery High School c L . Floyd 

Calera Academy C. ' C. Slaton.' 

Southern Agricultural School, Abbeville j. b. Murphy. 

Barnes's School, Montgomery E R Barnes. 

Jackson Agricultural School j B Murphy 

Spring Lake School w c Griggs ' 

Pensacola Classical School H . C. Armstrong.' 

Eufaula District Academy R E Brookg 

ADMISSION OF YOUNG WOMEN. 

The privilege of becoming students in this college is 
granted by the Trustees to young women of mature mind 
and character, on the following conditions: 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



45 



The applicant must be seventeen years of age, and if a 
candidate for a degree, be able to pass a satisfactory ex- 
amination in each of the four subjects as named below. 

If the applicant is a candidate for admission as a 
special or irregular student, she must be able to pa«s a 
satisfactory examination in two of the subjects named, 
and may be admitted at an age less than seventeen, with 
a resident of Auburn acting as guardian, if application 
is approved by the Faculty. 

(a) In English — Proficiency in spelling and punctuation; Gram- 
mar (Lockwood-Whitney); Rhetoric (Lockwood's Lessons and Car- 
penter's Rhetoric); Scudder's Masterpieces of American Literature; 
Syie's From Milton to Tennyson. 

For requirements in reading in literature see page 41. 

(b) In History— Macy's Our Government; Chambers's History of 
the United States; Myers's General History. 

(c) In Mathematics— Arithmetic; Algebra, including quadratic 
equations, logarithms and series; Plane and Solid Geometry; Plane 
and Spherical Trigonometry, as in Wentworth. 

(d) In Latin— Grammar, including the forms and syntax; Jones's 
Latin Prose Composition; translation of selections from Caesar, 
Nepos, Virgil, Cicero's Orations, Cicero's Letters, or the equivalent. 

The equivalents of these subjects, as in above text-books, may be 

substituted. 

Botany will constitute a required part of the general course for 
young women who are candidates for a degree. 

When admitted, upon complying with the conditions above stated, 
they may enter upon the study of any subject taught in the College 
and join any class, for which, upon examination, they may be found 
qualified. ' The only condition imposed will be that they engage in 
earnest study, and attend the exercises regularly. They will board 
in the town with private families and attend college only at the 
hours of their exercises. 

ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS. 

Entrance examinations will be held on Wednesday, 
the 10th of September, the day on which the session 
opens. Candidates will also be examined during the 
session, when application is made for admission. 
















<6 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



Applicants who are not prepared to stand the entrance 
examinations for full admission to the freshman class 
are admitted to the sub-college department, provided 
they are fifteen years of age, and are found after exami- 
nation qualified to profit by the instruction given. Those 
who, after admission, are inattentive to their studies, 
and neglectful of their duties will be required to with- 
draw, but those who are studious and make sufficient 
progress will be advanced to full admission to the fresh- 
man class when they are qualified to pass satisfactorily 
the required examinations. 

Students, upon their arrival at Auburn, will report immediately 
to the President. No student will be admitted to a recitation in any- 
class previous to matriculation. 



NUMBER OF EXERCISES REQUIRED. 

All students are required to have not less than fifteen recitations 
per week, or their equivalent, in addition to the exercises in labora- 
tory work, drawing and military drill. These additional exercises 
occupy not less than twelve hours per week, and in all give twenty- 
seven to thirty hours per week required in college exercises. 

Special and Irregular Students. 

The privilege of electing studies in the lower classes 
is not granted to young students nor to their parents. 

The Faculty will assign a student, on admission, to 
that class of a prescibed course for which he is qualified; 
and for special reasons, approved by the Faculty, he 
may be permitted to become irregular. 

Students qualified to prosecute the studies of the 
junior class, and those over twenty-one years of age that 
are not candidates for a degree, are permitted to take 
with the advice of the Faculty, the subjects of studv for 
which they may be qualified. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



47 



For an applicant to enter upon the study of Electrical 
and Mechanical Engineering as a special or irregular 
student, he must have studied algebra through quadrat- 
ics and logarithms, plane geometry, and plane trigonom- 
etry. 

The professor in charge of a department will decide 
by examination whether a special student is prepared 
for admission to his class. 

A student who does not take all the studies in a class of one of 
the degree courses, as prescribed in the catalogue, and is permitted 
to take an irregular course, will be assigned to a member of the 
Faculty, who will act as his special adviser, and when his course of 
study has been approved by the Faculty, no other change will be 
permitted without the endorsement of his adviser. 

Regular students who fail to pass satisfactory final examinations 
in any one study become irregular students. They will be classed 
as regular students pursuing a course for a degree, whenever they 
can pass the examinations in those subjects in which they were 

found deficient. 

Students, candidates for a degree, who are not in full standing 
in all the prescribed studies of a class, rank in the military depart- 
ment with that class in which they have the greatest number of 
studies, and their names are so placed in the catalogue. 

ADMISSION TO HIGHER CLASSES. 

At the beginning of each term a student in the sub-freshman class 
may, on application approved by the Faculty, be examined for ad- 
mission to the freshman class in history, English, mathematics, and 
be admitted to the freshman class in that subject only. 

Students who have completed satisfactorily all the studies of the 
sophomore class, as prescribed in the catalogue, in any one of the 
regular degree courses, can enter, without condition, the junior 
class in any course, except in the general course, or the course m 
pharmacy, in which Latin is required. 

Students who are admitted to the junior class from other institu- 
tions, on examinations in English, Latin, and mathematics, and who 
have not completed all the studies of the sophomore class, in order 
to graduate, will be required to complete the course in chemistry 
and history as taught in the sophomore class. 










48 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

The courses of study include the Physical, Chemical, 
and Natural Sciences, with their applications; Agri- 
culture; Biology; Mechanics, Astronomy, Mathematics; 
Drawing; Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical Engineer- 
ing; Physiology and Veterinary Science, Pharmacy; 
English, French, German and Latin Languages; His- 
tory, Political Economy; Mental and Moral Sciences. 

The studies are arranged in regular courses so as to 
offer liberal and practical education as a preparation 
for the active pursuits of life. 

There are six degree courses for undergraduates, each 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science, (B. So.) 
and requiring four years for its completion. 

I. Course in Chemistry and Agriculture. 

II. Course in Civil Engineering. 

III. Course in Electrical and Mechanical En- 
gineering. 

TV. General Course. 

V. Course in Pharmacy. 

VI. Course in Chemistry and Metallurgy. 

There are also three partial courses, each requiring 
two years for its completion : 

VII. Two- Year Course in Agriculture. 

VIII. Two- Year Course in Mechanic Arts. 

IX. Two- Year Course in Pharmacy. 

Course I. includes theoretical and practical instruc- 
tion in those branches that relate to chemistry and api- 
culture, and is especially adapted to those who propose 
to devote themselves to agriculture or chemical pursuits 

Course II. includes the principles and applications 
of the sciences that directly relate to civil engineering 



I 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



49 



and is adapted to those who expect to enter that pro- 
fession. 

Course III. includes, besides the general principles 
and applications of the sciences, a special course in 
the applications of electricity and mechanics, and is ar- 
ranged for the profession of electrical and mechanical 
engineering. 

Course IV. has been arranged to give a general and 
loss technical education in subjects of science and lan- 
guage to meet the wants of those students who have 
selected no definite vocation in life, as well as of those 
who propose ultimately to engage in teaching or in some 
commercial or professional business. - 

Course V. includes, besides the general education of 
course IV. in the lower classes, a special course in phar- 
macy and chemistry, and is adapted to those who expect 
to become pharmacists, manufacturing chemists, or to 
enter upon the study of medicine. 

Course VI. provide® for thorough theoretical and prac- 
tical instruction in pure and technical chemistry and 
metallurgy, and in the scientific branches relating 
thereto. Students taking this course also pursue the 
study of German and French during the Junior and 
Senior years, and are thus prepared to utilize for ref- 
erence the scientific journals and works published in 
those languages. 

Courses VII. VIII. IX. have been arranged for the 
benefit of those students who, for reasons satisfactory 
to themselves, are unable to continue at college four 
years and to take one of the regular degree courses. 

A student who completes satisfactorily all the work of the senior 
class in a department, including the laboratory work, will be awarded 
a certificate of proficiency in said subject. 

Students who complete either of the two-year courses will, on 



50 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



passing a satisfactory examination, receive certificates indicating 
their attainments. 

No degree or certificate of proficiency will be given in any course 
unless the applicant has passed a satisfactory examination in ele- 
mentary English. Every candidate for a degree will be required to 
stand this special examination during the second term of the Senior 
year. 

Declamations and themes or orations are required of all regular 
students pursuing courses leading to a degree. 

POST-OKA I >UATE COURvSES. 












A more extended post-graduate course of study may 
be takes by a graduate of this College or of any other 
institution of equal grade. The completion of a course 
which leads to a post-graduate degree of Master of Sci- 
ence requires one year's residence at the College, spent 
in the satisfactory prosecution of a course of study, with 
such laboratory work as may be approved by the Faculty. 

The candidate must also present to the Faculty a satisfactory 
thesis showing independent investigation upon some subject per- 
taining to his course, and must pass an examination, at the close of 
each term, on the course of study prescribed, in which he must at- 
tain a grade of 75 per cent. The examination is written, and also 
oral in the presence of the Faculty. 

The subject of the thesis must be submitted to the Faculty for 
approval prior to January 1st, and the thesis given to the professor 
by May 1st. 

Applicants for a post-graduate degree and special students in post- 
senior studies are subject to the general regulations as other stu- 
dents, and pay the same fees, but are exempt from all military duty. 

The following courses are prescribed for the degree named: 

1. Master of Science.— Studies in three departments, in two of 
which the candidate must have previously completed the full course 
of the senior class; or in special cases, with the approval of the 
Faculty, a student may devote his full time to work in two de- 
partments, in each of which he has completed the full senior course. 

2. Master of Science in Pharmacy.— Pharmacy and Chemistry. 

3. Master of Science in Civil Engineering.— Civil Engineering, 
Mathematics, Analytical Mechanics. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



51 



4. Master of Science in Electrical and Mechanical Engineering. — 
Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering. 

5. Master of Science in Mining Engineering. — Students who have 
receive the degree of B. Sc. in engineering, civil, or electrical and 
mechanical, or in the course of chemistry and mettallurgy, or who 
have prosecuted an equivalent course of study, can enter upon a 
special course of mining engineering, which includes the following 
subjects of study: 

Industrial Chemistry, Analytic Chemistry, Assaying, Reduction of 
Ores, Mineralogy, Economic Geology, with practical work in the 
field, Mining Machinery with the applications of steam and elec- 
tricity to the various operations connected with the exploitation of 
mines. 

The student, if a candidate for a degree, will also be required to 
prosecute the necessary studies in that course of engineering in 
which he has not graduated. This course of study will be under the 
charge of the professors in the different engineering departments, 
the professor of Chemistry, and the professor of Mineralogy and 
Geology. 

Special Students in Post-Senior Studies.— Students who are not 
graduates, but are qualified in special subjects to prosecute post- 
senior studies, and desire to prepare themselves more thoroughly 
for professional or special work in any one of the departments of en- 
gineering, in chemistry or pharmacy, veterinary science, or other 
subjects in which instruction is given, may, when qualified, with ap- 
proval of the Faculty, enter this higher department of study and 
have all the privileges of post-graduate students. 

A certificate of proficiency will be given when any one subject of 
a post-graduate course is satisfactorily completed. 

Two degrees will not be given the same year. 

PROFESSIONAL DEGREES. 

The professional degree of Civil Engineer, Electrical Engineer, 
Mechanical Engineer, Mining Engineer, or Pharmaceutical Chemist 
will be given two years after receiving the degree of Master of 
Science, provided the intervening time of two years has been spent 
in a responsible position in practical engineering work in that de- 
partment in which he received the degree of Master of Science, or 
in practical pharmacy, and an approved thesis is submitted to the 
Faculty, with a report of the character of the work done. 

SPECIAL ONE-YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 
Young men over twenty-one years of age who desire to study agri- 
culture will be permitted, without examination, to enter any class 
under the professor of agriculture, and will be excused from reciting 









52 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 







in any other class, from military duty, and from all other college 
duties; but will be under the general college regulations, and will 
be required to have their time fully occupied. 

They may attend the lectures in agriculture in all the classes and 
engage in the practical work at the experiment station, in the field, 
stock-yard, dairy, garden, orchard, vineyard, etc., and may thus, in 
one year, acquire valuable practical knowledge of scientific agricul- 
ture. 

PHOTOGRAPHY. 

During the session there will be given by Professor Mell a course 
of twelve lectures on photography. This course will be elective, and 
the instruction will be open to any student that may desire to learn 
how to make pictures. It will be necessary for each student to pro- 
vide himself with an outfit that will cost from $11.50 to $16.00. 

LABORATORY INSTRUCTION. 

Laboratory instruction constitutes an important fea- 
ture in the courses of education provided for the students 
of this Institute, and as far as possible all students are 
required to enter upon laboratory work in some one de- 
partment. 

Laboratory instruction and practical Work are given 
in the following departments : 

I. Chemistry. 

II. Civil Engineering, Field Work, Surveying, Etc. 
III. Agriculture. 
IV. Botany. 

V. Mineralogy. 

VI. Biology. 

VII. Technical Drawing. 
VIII. Mechanic Arts. 
IX. Physics. 

X. Electrical Engineering. 
XL Mechanical Engineering. 
XII. Physiology and Veterinary Science. 
XIII. Pharmacy. 

No TE . special work in English or History may be taken by stu- 
dents in the general course as a substitute for laboratory work. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



53 



I. COURSE IN CHEMISTRY AND AGRICULTURE. 



The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per 

week. 



First Term. 

5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

3. English. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 

2. Physiology. 

2. Chemical Lab'y. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 
Second Term. 

5. English. 5. 

2. History. 3. 

5. Mathematics. 5. 

3. Elementary Physics. 2. 
3. Drawing. 3. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. 
3. Military Drill. 3. 



Third Term. 

English. 

History. 

Mathematics. 

Agriculture. 

Drawing. 

Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

Military Drill. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Second Term. 

3. English. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 
2. Physiology. 

2. Chemical Lab'y. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

3. English. 
3. Botany (a). 

5. Mathematics. 
3. General Chemistry. 

2. Agriculture (b). 

3. Drawing. 
2. Physiology. 

2. Chemical Lab'y. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 



First Term. 

3. English. 3. 

3. Physics. 3. 

3. Industrial Chemistry.3. 
2. Agriculture. 2. 

4. Botany (Lab'y.) 4. 

1. Military Tactics? 1. 
9. Chemical Lab'y. 9. 

2. Veterinary Science. 2. 

2. Clinical Lab'y. 2. 

3. Military Drill. 3. 



First ferm. 

2. English Literature. 2. 

2. Mental Science (d). 2. 

2. Physics. 2. 

2. Geology. 2. 

5. Biology. 5. 
2. Agricultural Chemis. 2. 

1. Military Science. 1. 
9. Chemical Lab'y. 9. 

2. Veterinary Science. 2. 
2. Clinical Lab'y. 2. 



Second Term. 

English. 3. 

Physics. 3. 
Industrial Chemistry.3. 

Agriculture. 2. 

Botany (Lab'y.) 4. 

Military Tactics. 1. 

Chemical Lab'y. 9. 

Veterinary Science. 2. 

Clinical Lrab'y. 2. 

Military Drill. 3. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 

, Political Economy. 2. 

Mental Science (d). 2. 

Astronomy. 2. 

Geology. 2. 

Biology. 5. 
Agricultural Chemis. 2. 

Military Science. 1. 

Chemical Lab'y. 9. 

Veterinary Science. 2. 

Clinical Lab'y. 2. 



Third Term. 

English. 
Physics. 

Industrial Chemistry. 
Horticulture. 
Botany (lrab'y.) 
Military Tactics. 
Chemical Lab'y. 
Veterinary Science. 
Clinical Lab'y. 
Military Drill. 



Third Term. 
Political Economy. 
Mental Science (d). 
Astronomy. 
Geology. 
Biology. 

Agricultural Chemis. 
Military Science. 
Chemical Lab'y. 
Veterinary Science. 
Clinical Lab'y. 



(a) Begins March 1st. (b) Also Practical Agriculture w^* M *~, 
(c) Begins Feb. 15th. (d) French or German may be substituted. 



54 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



II. COURSE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per 

week. 






First Term. 

5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

3. English. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
2. Agriculture (b). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

2. Chemical Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

3. English, French or 

German. 
3. Physics. 
5. Mathematics. 
5. Civil Engineering. 

5. Drawing. 

1. Military Tactics. 

6. Lab'y. Mechanic 

Arts (c). 

1. Field Work, Engi- 
neering. 

3. Military Drill. 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 
Second Term. 

5. English. 

2. History. 

5. i.^atnematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Second Term. 

3. English. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 

2. Agriculture (b). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

2. Chemical Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 

3. English, French or 

German. 
3. Physics. 
5. Mathematics. 
5. Civil Engineering. 

5. Drawing. 

1. Military Tactics. 

6. Lab'y. Mechanic 

Arts fc^ 

1. Field Work, Engi- 
neering. 

3. Military Drill. 

SENIOR CLASS. 



First Term. Second Term. 

2. English Literature, 2. Political Economy, 



(d). 
2. Physics. 

2. Geology. 

3. Mathematics. 



Id) 
2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 

3. Mathematics. 



Third Term. 

5. English. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

3. English. 
3. Botany (a). 

5. Mathematics. 

3. General Chemistry. 
2. Agriculture (b). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

2. Chemical Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

3. English, French or 

German. 
3. Physics. 
5. Mathematics. 
5. Civil Engineering. 

5. Drawing. 

1. Military Tactics. 

6. Lab'y. Mechanic 

Arts ( c} 

1. Field Work, Engi- 
neering. 

3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

2. Political Economy, 

(d). 
2. Astronomy. 

2. Geology. 

3. Mathematics. 



(a) Begins March 1st. 

(b) For Agriculture may be substituted Physical Laboratory. 

(c) Or Mineralogy. 

(d) For Eng. Lit. and Pol. Econ. may be substituted for French or 
German. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



55 



5. Civil Engineering. 

5, Drawing. 

1. Military Science. 

4. Mech. Eng., Lab'y. 
Field Work, Engi- 
neering. 



5. Civil Engineering. 

5. Drawing. 

1. Military Science. 

4. Mech. Eng., Lab'y. 
Field Work, Engi- 
neering. 



5. Civil Engineering. 

5. Drawing. 

1. Military Science. 

4. Mech. Eng., Lab'y. 
Field Work, Engi- 
neering. 



III. COURSE IN ELECTRICAL AND MECHANI- 



CAL ENGINEERING. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of **ours 
week. In * reshman and bophomore classes the same studies 
prescribed as in Course II in Civil Engineering. 



per 
are 



First Term. 



3. 

3. 
5. 
4. 

3. 

4. 
4. 
6. 
1. 
3. 



3. 



English, French or 
German. 

Physics. 

Mathematics. 

Electrical Engi- 
neering. 

Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

Mechanical Drawing. 4. 

Electrical Lab'y. 4. 

Mechanic Art mb'y. 6. 

Military Tactics. 1. 

Military Drill. 3. 



3. 

5. 
4. 

3. 



First Term. 

2. Eng. Literature, 2 

(a). 

2. Physics. 2. 

2. Geology. 2. 

3. Mathematics. 3. 
5. Electrical Engi- 5. 

neering. 

5. Mechanical Engi- 5. 

neering. 
2. Electrical Designing. 2. 

6. Electrical Lab'y. 6. 

4. Mech. Eng. Lab'y. 4. 
1. Military Science. 1. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 

English, French or 3. 

German. 

Physics. 3. 

Mathematics. 5. 

Electrical Engi- 4. 

neering. 

Mechanical Engi- 3. 

neering. 
Mechanical Drawing. 4. 

Electrical Lab'y. 4. 

Mechanic Art Lab'y. 6. 

Military Tactics. 1. 

Military Drill. 3. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 

Political Economy, 2. 

(a). 

Astronomy. 2. 

Geology. 2. 

Mathematics. 3. 

Electrical Engi- 5. 

neering. 

Mechanical Engi- 5. 

neering. 

Electrical Designing. 2. 

Electrical Lab'y. 6. 

Mech. Eng. Lab'y. 4. 

Military Science. 1. 



Third Term. 

English, French or 
German. 

Physics. 

Mathematics. 

Electrical Engi- 
neering. 

Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

Mechanical Drawing. 

Electrical Lab'y. 

Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

Military i actics. 

Military Drill. 



Third Term. 



Political Economy, 
(a). 

Astronomy. 

Geology. 

Mathematics. 

Electrical Engi- 
neering. 

Mechanical Engi- 
neering. 

Electrical Designing. 

Electrical Lab'y. . 

Mech. Eng. Lab'y. 

Military Science. 



(a) French or German may be substituted. 




56 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



IV. CHEMISTRY AND METALLURGY. 



The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number 01 hours per 
weeK. In the Freshman class and Sophomore classes uie same studies 
are prescribe- as in either course I in Agriculture and Chemistry or 
in course V in General Course. 



First Term. 

3. English. 
3. Physics. 
3. Industrial Chemis- 
try. 

2. Organic Chemistry. 

3. German. 

4.*Mineralogy (Lab'y.) 
1. Military Science. 

9. Chemical Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 

3. English. 3. 

3. Physics. 3. 

3. Industrial Chemis- 3. 
try. 

2. Organic Chemistry. 2. 

3. German. 3. 

4. Mineralogy (Lab'y.) 4. 
1. Military science. 1. 
9. Chemical Lab'y. 9. 
3. Military Drill. 3. 




First Term. 

2. English and Litera- 2. 
ture. 

2. Physics. 2. 

3. German. 3. 

2. Geology. 2. 

3. French. 3. 
2. Metallurgy and En- 2. 

gineering Chem. 

1. Analytical Chemisty. 1. 

1. Military Science. 1. 

9. Chemical Lab'y. 9. 



SENIOR CLASS. 

Second Term. 

Political Economy. 2. 

Physics. 2. 

German. 3. 

Geology. 2. 

French. 3. 

Metallurgy anu !hm- 2. 

gineering Chem. 

Analytical Chemisty. 1. 

Military Science. 1. 

Chemical l^ab'y. 9. 



Third Term. 

English. 
Physics. 

Industrial Chemis- 
try. 
Organic Chemistry. 
German. 

Mineralogy (Lab'y.) 
Military Science. 
Chemical Lab'y. 
Military Drill. 



Third Term. 
Political Economy. 

Astronomy. 
German. 
Geology. 
French. 

Metallurgy and En- 
gineering chem. 
Analytical Chemisty. 
Military Science. 
Chemical Lab'y. 



V. GENERAL COURSE. 

The numbers opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per 

week. 



First Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 

3. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art 
3. Military Drill. 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Second Term. 
3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 

Lab'y. 6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

3. Englisn. 

3. History. 

3. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



1 



♦Mechanic Art. Lab. may be substituted. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



57 









SOPHOMORE CLASS. 






First Term. 




Second Term. 




Third Term. 


5. 


Latin. 


5. 


Latin. 


5. 


Latin. 


3. 


History. 


3. 


History. 


3. 


Botany (a). 


5. 


Mathematics. 


5. 


Mathematics. 


5. 


Mathematics. 


3. 


Gen'l. Chemistry. 


3. 


Gen'l. Cnemistry. 


3. 


Gen'l. Chemistry. 


3. 


Drawing. 


3. 


Drawing. 


3. 


Drawing. 


6. 


Mechanic Art Lab'y. 


6. 


Mechanic Art Lab'y. 


6. 


Mechanic Art Lab'y. 


2. 


Chemical Lab'y. 


2. 


Chemical Lab'y. 


2. 


Chemical Lab y. 


3. 


Military Drill. 


3. 


Military Drill. 
JUNIOR CLASS. 


3. 


Military Drill. 




First Term. 




Second Term. 




Third Term. 


3. 


English. 


3. 


English. 


3. 


English. 


3. 


Physics. 


3. 


Physics. 


3. 


Physics. 


3. 


Mathematics. 


3. 


Mathematics. 


3. 


Mathematics. 


3. 


French. 


3. 


French. 


3. 


French. 


3. 


German. 


3. 


German. 


3. 


German. 


3. 


Latin. 


3. 


Latin. 


3. 


Latin. 


1. 


Military Tactics. 


1. 


Military Tactics. 


1. 


Military Tacttcs. 


6. 


Lab'y. Work (b). 


6. 


Lab'y. Work (b). 


6. 


Lab'y. Work (b). 


3. 


Military Drill. 


3. 


Military Drill. 
SENIOR CLASS. 


3. 


Military Drill. 




First Term. 




Second Term. 




Third Term. 


2. 


English. 


2. 


Pol. Econ. (c). 


2. 


Political Economy. 


2. 


Mental Science. 


2. 


Mental Science. 


2. 


Mental Science. 


2. 


Physics. 


2. 


Astronomy. 


2. 


Astronomy. 


2. 


Geology. 


2. 


Geology. 


2. 


Geology. 


3. 


Frencn. 


3. 


French. 


3. 


French. 


3. 


German. 


3. 


German. 


3. 


German. 


2. 


Latin. 


2. 


Latin. 


2. 


Latin. 


1. 


Military Science. 


1. 


Military Science. 


1. 


Military Science. 


6. 


Lab'y. Work (b). 


6. 


Lab'y. Work (b). 


6. 


Lab'y. Work (b). 



VI. COURSE IN PHARMACY. 

The numerals opposite the subjects indicate the number of hours per 

week. 



First Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Second Term. 

3. English. 

2. History. 
5. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

3. English. 
3. History. 
3. Latin. 

5. Mathematics. 
3. Drawing. 

2. Agriculture. 

6. Mechanic Arts. 

3. Military Drill. 



(a) Begins March 1st. (b) The student may elect the laboratory of 
any department for which he may be qualified, (c) Begins Feb. 15 






58 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



. 












First Term. 

5. Latin. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Gen'l Chemistry. 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

2. Chemical Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

3. Physics. 

6. Chemical Lab'y. 

4. Botanical Lab'y. 
3. English (b). 

3. Pharmacy. 

9. Pharmaceutical Lab. 

4. Pharmacognosy. 
1. Military Tactics. 
3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

5. Biology. 

6. Chemical Lab'y. 
5. Pharmacy. 

12. Pharmaceutical 
4. Pharmacognosy. 
1. Military Science 
3. Materia Medica. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Second Term. 

5. Latin. 
3. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Gen'l Cnemistry. 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

2. Chemical Lab'y. 

3. Military Drill. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 
Second Term. 

3. Physics. 

6. Chemical Lab'y. 

4. Botanical Lab'y. 
3. English (b). 

3. Pharmacy. 

9. Pharmaceutical Lab. 

4. Pharmacognosy. 
1. Military Tactics. 
3. Military Drill. 

SENIOR CLASS. 
Second Term. 

5. Biology. 

6. Chemical Lab'y. 
5. Pharmacy. 



Third Term. 

5. Latin. 

3. Botany (a). 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Gen'l Chemistry. 

2. Physiology. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

2. Chemical La^ y. 

3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

3. Physics. 

6. Chemical Lab'y. 

4. Botanical Lab'y. 
3. English (b). 

3. Pharmacy. 

9. Pharmaceutical Lab. 

4. Pharmacognosy. 
1. Military Tactics. 
3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

3. Biology. 
6. Toxicology. 
5. Pharmacy. 



Lab.12. Pharmaceutical Lab.12. Pharmaceutical Lab. 
4. Pharmacognosy. 4. Pharmacognosy. 

1. Military Science. 1. Military Science. 
G. Materia Medica. 3. Bacteriology. 



VII. TWO-YEAR COURSE IN MECHANIC ARTS. 

FIRST YEAR. 



First Term. 

5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Laby 
3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

3. English. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Physics. 

3. Drawing. 

12. Mechanic Art Lab. 

3. Military Drill. 



Second Term. 
5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 
3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Laby 
3. Military Drill. 

SECOND YEAR. 
Second Term. 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 
3. Drawing. 
12. Mechanic Art Lab. 
3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 
5. English. 
2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

2. Agriculture. 

3. Drawing. 

6. Mechanic Art Laby 
3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 
3. English. 
5. Mathematics. 
3. Physics. 
3. Drawing. 
12. Mechanic Art Lab. 
3. Military Drill. 



(a) Begins March 1st. (b) French or German may be substituted. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



'59 



VIII. TWO-YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 



First Term. 
5. English. 

2. History. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Elementary Physics. 

3. Drawing. 

4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 

2. Practical Agricul- 
ture. 



First Term. 

3. English. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Gen'l. Chemistry. 

4. Agriculture. 
2. Physiology. 

2. Veterinary Science. 
12. Practical Agricul- 
ture. 

3. Military Drill. 



' FIRST YEAR. 

Second Term. 

5. English. 5. 

2. History. ,2. 
5. Mathematics. 5. 

3. Elementary Physics. 2. 

3. Drawing. 3. 

4. Mechanic Art Lab'y. 4. 
3. Military Drill. 3. 
2. Practical Agricul- 2, 

ture. 



SECOND YEAR. 

Second Term. 

3. English. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Gen'l. Chemistry. 

4. Agriculture. 
2. Physiology. 

2. Veterinary. Science. 
12. Practical Agricul- 
ture. 

3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

English. 

History. 

Mathematics. 

Agriculture. 

Drawing. 

Mechanic Art Lab'y. 

Military Drill. 

Practical Agricul- 
ture. 



Third Term. 

3. English. 

5. Mathematics. 

3. Gen'l. Chemistry. 

4. Agriculture. 
2. Physiology. 

2. Veterinary Science. 
12. Practical Agricul- 

. ture. 

3. Military Drill. 



IX. TWO-YEAR COURSE IN PHARMACY. 



First Term. 

3. Gen'l. Chemistry. 

2. Chemical Lab'y. 

3. English. 

2. Physiology. 

3. Pharmacy. 

4. Pharmacognosy. 
6. Mechanic Art 

Lab'y (a). 
3. Military Drill. 



First Term. 

5. Pharmacy. 

5. Pharmacognosy. 
12. Pharmaceutical 

Lab'y. 

6. Chemical Lab'y. 
3. Materia Medica. 
6. Botanical Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



FIRST YEAR. 
Second Term. 

3. Gen'l. Chemistry. 

2. Chemical Lab'y. 

3. English. 

2. Physiology. 

3. Pharmacy. 

4. Pharmacognosy. 
6. Mechanic Art 

Lab'y (a). 
3. Military Drill. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Second Term. 

5. Pharmacy. 

5. Pharmacognosy. 
12. Pharmaceutical 

Lab'y. 

6. Chemical Lab'y. 
3. Materia Medica. 
6. Botanical Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 
3. Gen'l. Chemistry. 

2. Chemical Lab'y. 

3. Botany. 

2. Physiology. 

3. Pharmacy. 

4. Pharmacognosy. 
6. Mechanic Art 

Lab'y (a). 
3. Military Drill. 



Third Term. 

5. Pharmacy. 

5. Pharmacognosy. 
12. Pharmaceutical 

Lab'y. 

6. Toxicology. 
3. Bacteriology. 

6. Botanical Lab'y. 
3. Military Drill. 



(a) or Physical Laboratory. 



■■ 







SCHEDULE OF EXERCISES. 








HOURI 


1 • • MONDAY. 


TUESDAY. 


WEDNESDAY. 


THURSDAY. 


FRIDAY. 


SATURDAY. 




4. Algebra. 


4. Geometry. 


4. Algebra. 


4. Geometry. 


4. 


Algebra. 




I. 


3. Latin. 


3. Agriculture. 


3. Latin. 


3. Latin. 


3. 


Latin. 






2. Pharmacy. 


3. Latin. 


2. Pharmacy. 


2. German. 


2. 


Pharmacy. 




8-9 


2. Mec. Engineer'g. 


2. German. 


2. Vet. Science. 


2. Botany. 


2. 


Veterinary Sci. 


Exercises in Elo- 




1 and 2. Drawing. 


2. Botany. 


2. Mec. Engineer'g. 


2. Mec. Engineer'g. 


1 and 2. Drawing. 


cution. 




1. Elec. Enginer'g. 


1 and 2. Drawing. 


1. Biology. 


1 and 2. Drawing. 


1. 


Biology. 




. 


1. Biology. 


1. Elec. Engineer'g. 


1 and 2. Drawing. 


1. Mental Science. 


1. 


Elec. Engineer'g. 






1. German. 


1. Mental Science. 


1. Elec. Engineer'g. 
1. German. 


1. Elec. Engineer g. 


1. 


German. 






4. English. 


4. History. 


4. English. 


4. History. 


4. 


English. 




II. 


3. Chemistry. 


3. Physiology. 


3. Chemistry. 


3. Agriculture. 


3. 


Chemistry. 






2. Civ. Engineer'g. 


2. Civ. Engineer'g. 


2. Civ. Engineer'g. 


2. Civ. Engineer'g. 


2. 


Civ. Engineer'g. 


Military Drill. 


9-10 


2. Elc. Engineer'g. 


2. Elc. Engineer'g. 


2. Elc. Engineer'g. 


2. Botany. 


2. 


Latin. 






2. Latin. 


2. Botany. 


2. Latin. 


2. Elc. Engineer'g. 


2. 


Mec. Drawing. 






1. Calculus. 


1. Chemistry. 


1. Calculus. 


1. Chemistry. 


1. 


Calculus. 






1. Biology (Lab.) 


1. French. 


L. Vet. Science. 
1. Pharmacognosy. 


1. French. 


1. 


Vet. Science. 






3. English. 


4. English. 


3. English. 


4. English. 


3. 


English. 


Mechanic Arts. 


III. 


2. Physics. 


3. Botany, (2,3.) 


2. Physics. 


3. History (1, 2.) 


2. 


Physics. 


Chemical Lab'y. 




1. Civ. Engineer'g. 


3. History (1,2.) 


1. Latin. 


3. Botany, (2, 3., 


1. 


Civ. Engineer'g. 


Electrical Lab'y. 




L. Biology (Lab.) 


1. French. 


1. Civil Engineer'g. 


2. French. 


1. 


Pharmacognosy. 


Physical Lab'y. 


10-11 


L. Latin. j 


2. Mec. Drawing. 


1. Biology. 


1. Civ. Engineer'g. 


4. 


History (3.) 


Veterinary Clinics. 




L. Mec. Engineer'g. 

: 
; 

: 


L. Machine Design. 
L. Pharmacognosy. 
L. Biology. 
L. Civ. Engineer'g. 
L. Mec. Engineer'g. 


L. i.iec. Engineer'g. 


1. Mec. Engineer'g. 
1. Machine Desi'g. 
1. Pharmacognosy. 


1. 


Mec. Engineer'g. 


Field Engineer'g. 



o 



> 



> 



■-" 



a 
o 



as 

► < 

1-2 



SCHEDULE OF EXERCISES — Continued 



i i 



HOURS . 


MONDAY. 


TUESDAY. 


WEDNESDAY. 


THUBSDAY. 


FRIDAY. 


■ 

SATURDAY. 


i 


[. Physics. 


1. Latin. 


4. Physics (1, 2.) 


4. Latin. 


4. Physics (1, 2.) 


1. Pharmaceutical 


IV. 4. Mechanic Arts. 


1. Drawing. 


4. Latin (3.) 


3. Physiology. 


4. Mechanic Arts. 


Lab'y. 


4. Agriculture (3.) 


2. Horticulture. 


4. Mechanic Arts. 


2. Horticulture. 


4. Agriculture (3). 


3. Mechanic Arts. 


11-12 1 


t. Latin (i; 2.) 


2. Mathematics. 


3. History (1, 2.) 


L Mathematics. 


4. Latin (1, 2.) 


Chemical Lab'y. 


i 


5. Drawing. 


2. Chemistry Agr. 


3. Botany ^2, 3.) 


2. Chemistry Afe . 


3. Drawing. 


Electrical Lab'y. 




1. Mathematics. 


2. Pharmacognosy. 


2. Mathematics. 


1. French. 


2. Mathematics. 


Physical Lab y. 




2. Chemistry. 


1. French. 


2. Chemistry. 


1. Physics. 


2. Chemistry. 


Veterinary C.inics. 




2. Pharmacognosy. 


1. Physics. 


2. Pharmacognosy. 




2. Pharmacognosy. 


Field Engineer'g. 




1. English (1, 2.) 




1. English (1, 2.) 




1. Military Science. 






1. Pol. Econ. (2, 3). 




1. Pol. Econ. (2, 3.) 


, 




- 




4. Drawing. 


3. Mathematics. 


4. Drawing. 


3. Mathematics. 


4. Drawing. 


3. Mechanic Arts. 


V. 


4. Mechanic Arts. 


2. English. 


1. Mechanic Arts. 


2. English. 


4. Mechanic Arts. 


Chemical Lab'y. 




3. Mathematics. 


1. Geology. 


3. Mathematics. 


1. Geology. 


3. Mathematics. 


Electrical Lab'y. 




2. English. 


1. Pharmacy. 


2. German. 


1. Pharmacy. 


2. Military Tactics. 


Physical Lab'y. 


12-1 


1. Elec. Design'g. 




2. Anal. Chemist'y. 




1. Elec. Designing. 


Veterinary Clinics. 




1. French. 




1. Pharmacy. 




1. Pharmacy. 


Field Engineering. 




1. Pharmacy. 




1. Eng. Chem. and 


;..-';* 








1. Eng. Chem. and 




Metallurgy. 










Metallurgy. 




1. Elec. Designing. 








P. M.!4. Mechanic Arts. 


3. Mechanic Arts. 


J4. Mechanic Arts. 


3. Mechanic Arts. 


4. Mechanic Arts. 


1 


3. Field Work Agr. 


2. Mineralogical Lab. 


3. Field Work. Agr. 


2. Mineralogical Lab. 3. Field Work Agr. 




vi, vn 1 & 2 Lab. Cheunsty. 


Military Drill (*) 


1 & 2 Laby. Chem. 


Military Drill (*). 


2. French. 






1 & 2 Fielv. Work 


1. Mech. Lab'y. 


1 & 2 Field Work, 


1. Mech. Lab'y. 


1 & 2 Lab. Chem. 




2-4 


Engineering. 


I Elec. Lab'y. Work. 


Engineering. 


^lec. Lab'y. Work. 


1 & 2 Field Work, 






1 & 2 Mach. Work. 


1 & 2 History. 


1 & 2 Mach. Work. 


1 & 2 History. 


Engineering. 






Elec. Lab. Work. 


i 


^x'cis in Elocut'n. 




1 & 2 Mach. Work. 






Physical Lab y. 


■ 


Elec. Lab. Work. 
Physical Laby. 




^x'cis. in Elocut'n. 
Elec. Lab. Work. 
Physical Lab'y. 




Chapel services dai 


ly at 7:45 a. m. * Fi 


•oin 4:30 to 5:30 p. m 










Numbers prefixed < 


ienote classes — 1 den< 


)tes senior, 2 junior, etc. Numbers affixed- 


•(1), t*i, (3), denote terms. 



> 



o 

hi 

o 

i— * 
a 






o> 





Departments of Instruction. 



MATHEMATICS. 



PROFESSOR SMITH, 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR CRENSHAW. 



INSTRUCTOR PATRICK. 



The subjects taught in the different classes in this de- 
partment are as follows: 

Freshman Class. Algebra through quadratic equa- 
tions and series, geometry (seven books Wentworth), 
original solutions of exercises. 

Sophomore Class. Solid geometry, plane and spheri- 
cal trigonometry, surveying, mensuration. 

Junior Class. Analytical geometry, descriptive 
geometry, differential calculus. 

Senior Class. Differential and integral calculus. 

Two objects are sought to be obtained : First, mental 
discipline; second, a thorough knowledge of the prin- 
ciples of pure mathematics and their practical apppli- 
cations. 

Theoretical and practical instruction is given to the 
sophomore class in land surveying, mapping, plotting 
and computing areas, etc., also in the theory, adjustment 
and use of instruments. 

The class, in sections of six or eight, devote three 
afternoons a week during the second and third terms 
to field practice. 

The completion of this course, common to all stu- 
dents, lays the foundation for the pure and applied 
mathematics of the mechanical and engineering courses. 








BOTANICAL LABORATORY. 



L 



A 



m 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



63 



Analytical geometry, descriptive geometry, and calculus 
are pursued in the engineering courses. Especial atten- 
tion is given to their practical applications. 

During the entire course, instruction in text-books 
is supplemented by lectures. Solutions of original prac- 
tical problems are required of the student, to make him 
familiar with the application of (he principles and for- 
mulas. 

Text-Books. 

Wentworth's Algebra, Wentworth's Geometry, Wentworth's Trig- 
onometry, Robbins' Surveying, Wentworth's Analytical Geometry, 
Fannce's Descriptive Geometry, Taylor's Calculus, Johnson's Dif- 
ferential Equations, Osborne's Problems, Peck's Determinants. 



GEOLOGY AND BOTANY, 



PROFESSOR MELL. 

ii 

(teology. — Tin's subject is studied in llic 'senior class, 
and extends through the entire session. Special atten- 
tion is given to the greoloifV of Alabama, and many illus- 
trations are drawn from the coal and iron fields and 
other natural deposits of minerals in the Slate. Mineral 
springs, the origin of ore deposits, and the geo logical 
relations of soils are carefully studied. 

There is also a course of advanced work in practical 
geolouv for post -graduate students. This subject is 
pursued by applicants for the degrees of master of sci- 
ence and mining engineer. 

The junior classes in civil and mining engineering, 
chemistry and metallurgy, study mineralogy through 
the entire session. This work consists of a thorough 
course in blow-pipe analysis of the ordinary minerals, 
and lectures niton crystallography, with instruction 
bow to measure crystals and determine the physical eon- 



64 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

stants of minerals. An effort is made to familiarize the 
student with all the economic ores and the rocks enter- 
ing into the composition of soils. 

Botany. — The students of the sophomore class begin 
the study of botany the first of March, and continue it 
through the remainder of the session. Careful experi- 
mentis are conducted in the lecture room explaining the 
formation and germination of seed, the growth into the 
mature plant, and the various functions performed by 
the plant in its development. Each student is required 
to keep careful notes illustrated with drawings of the 
various organs of the plant under examination. A lim- 
ited amount of work is done in classification and nomen- 
clature. 

In the junior class, in the course of chemistry and 
agriculture, two terms are devoted to systematic and 
structural botany, and to advanced laboratory work 
with the microscope in the preparations of specimens 
showing plant structure; this work is sufficient to fa- 
miliarize the students with the methods of plant build- 
ing and cellular organization. Excellent microsopes 
of the most improved patterns, and all necessary chem- 
icals and apparatus for preparing and mounting vege- 
table tissues, are used by the students. 

The third term is devoted to the study of physiol- 
ogy of plants in order to understand the functions of 
the various organs after completion of the work in the 
histological laboratory. 

FACILITIES FOR WORK. 

Geology.— The department is equipped with models of Mount 
Shasta, the earthquake of 1887 in Japan, glass crystals for teaching 
crystallography; charts and maps of the geology of America and 
Europe; Colt's lantern complete with oil, oxy-hydrogen and auto- 
matic electric lamps; a large assortment of fine lantern slides rep- 
resenting geological formations in this country and abroad; well 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



65 



equipped mineralogical laboratory for thirty students, supplied with 
a collection of -representative minerals, and models of crystals. 

Botany. — The facilities for teaching this subject are as follows: 
A.uzoux's clastic models of seeds and flowers; a large collection of 
pressed plants of Alabama and other sections mounted and cata- 
logued. There is also a laboratory for practical work in botany 
equipped with slate-topped tables for twenty-eight students; dis- 
secting and compound microscopes of Zeiss, Leitz, and Bausch & 
Lomb; projection microscopic apparatus; microtomes by King and 
Bausch & Lomb; all the necessary glassware and smaller dissecting 
instruments required in a well equipped laboratory. The Zeiss com- 
pound microscope used by the professor for experiment work in 
connection with the station is supplied with Abbe's illuminating 
apparatus, slide changers, Abbe's camera lucida, polarizers, apo- 
chromatic objectives (16mm, 8 mm, 4mm, and homogeneous immer- 
sion), oculars (2, 3, 8, 12, 18), and photographic eye-pieces with 
micrometer. This laboratory is well lighted with gas and electricity 
and with a good exposure for ample sunlight. 

In connection with the department there is a photographic dark- 
room and an excellent photographic outfit, consisting of cameras 
varying in size from 4x5 to 6%x8% inches; Bausch & Lomb's pro 
fessional photo-micro camera extending to eight feet; Zeiss's ana- 
stigmat photographic lens, 6^x8 % fitted with Bausch & Lomb's 
diaphragm shutter and Zeiss's wide angle lens, 6M>x8i/>, all mounted 
in aluminum; Clark's lens fitted with diaphragm shutter; the ac- 
cessory apparatus and chemicals required for first-class work in 
photography. 

Tae students have access to the botanical garden where experi- 
ments in grass culture and many other plants of interest to the 
farmer are conducted by the professor. 

Text-Books. 

LeConte's Geology, Tarr's Economic Geology, Dana's Mineralogy, 
Crosby's Tables for Determining Minerals, Bergen's Botany, Mell's 
Laboratory Guide, and notes of lectures. 



1 






i 






66 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING AND DRAWING. 

PROFESSOR LANE. 

ASSISTANT HALEY. 

The special studies in this department begin in the 
junior class, and require a good knowledge of algebra, 
geometry, trigonometry, and analytical mechanics. 
They are as follows : 

Junior Class. — Simple, compound, reversed and para- 
bolical curves, turn-outs and crossings, leveling, gradi- 
ent*, setting slope stakes, etc. 

S]>ecial attention will be paid in this class to the loca- 
tion, construction, drainage and maintenance of coun- 
try roads; and the various pavements and foundations 
for the same. 

Senior Class — Classification, appearances, defects, 
seasoning, durability and preservation of timber; classi- 
fication and description of natural building stones; 
bricks and concretes; cast and wrought iron, steel and 
other metals; limes, cements, mortars and their manu- 
facture; paints and other preservatives; classification 
of strains and a general mathematical discussion of 
same; joints and fastenings; solid and open built beams; 
classification, construction and mechanics of masonry; 
foundations on land and in water; bridges and roofs of 
different kinds, their construction and strains deter- 
mined mathematically and graphically; common roads, 
their coverings, and location, and construction of rail- 
roads; navigable, irrigation and drainage canals; rivers 
and seacoast improvements. 

Theory and practice are combined in both classes. 

Text-Books. 

Junior Class— Henck's Field Book for Railway Engineers and 
Byrne's Highway Construction. 

Senior Class— Wheeler's Civil Engineering and Von Ott's Graphic 
Statics. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



67 



DRAWING. 

All of the students of the freshman and sophomore 
classes are required to take drawing; but only the stu- 
dent® in civil engineering in the junior and senior 
classes. 

The freshman class is taught linear and free-hand 
drawing. The sophomore class is instructed in the 
principles of orthographic and isometric projections, 
shades, shadows, perspective and tinting. In the junior 
class the instruction embraces a more extended course* 
in orthographic and isometric drawing, perspective, 
shades and tinting; also sketches of tools and machines, 
plans and elevations and cross-sections of buildings, 
and blue-prints. The senior class makes topographical 
drawings and drawings of machines, roofs, bridges, etc., 
to different scales, and blue-prints. Plans, profiles and 
sections of railroad surveys complete the instruction 
in this department. 

Text-Books. 

Freshman Class— Kitchener's Geometrical Note Book, Webb, 
Ware & Zaner's Practical Freehand Drawing. 

Sophomore Class— Davidson's Projections, Davidson's Practical 
Perspective, Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. 

Junior Class— Davidson's Building Constructions, Davidson's 
Drawing for Mechanics and Engineers, plates belonging to the col- 
lege, Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. 

Senior Class— French, English and American plates belonging to 
the college, Keuffel & Esser's Alphabet. 




68 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

ENGLISH AND POLITICAL ECONOMY. 

PROFESSOR THACH. 
PROFESSOR WIATT. 

i ASSISTANT SCROGGS. 

ASSISTANT LETCHER, 

OBJECTS AND METHODS. 

In this department the students pursue a systematic 
course in the English language and literature. 

Language is the avenue of approach to all knowledge; 
the interpretation of words is the fundamental process 
in education of whatsoever kind. A full course in Eng- 
lish is, therefore, considered especially important in the 
technical courses of study that do not include the an- 
cient classics. Accordingly, the course in English is 
continued throughout the four years of the college cur- 
riculum, three hours a week, and is made obligatory up- 
on all students, with the exception of. those pursuing the 
first two years of the course in Latin. In this extended 
drill in the grammar and literature of the English 
language, the endeavor is made to afford a training 
somewhat equivalent to the ordinary course in the classi- 
cal languages. 

In view of the ill preparation in languages, especially in their 
mother tongue, exhibited by many of the candidates for admission 
to the freshman class, it is deemed advisable, for the sake of honest 
work, to devote a portion of the first year to grounding such stu- 
dents in the principles of grammar. 

Especial attention is given to the study of the writings them- 
selves of leading English authors, since direct contact with litera- 
ture is considered more profitable than information merely about 
literature. 

All students before classed as regular in any course leading to 
a degree must conform to all the requirements in English for ad- 
mission as set forth on page 41, 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



69 



For requirements as to thesis and as to proficiency in English 
for certificates and degrees see pages 49, 50, and 109. 

Declamation and themes (or orations) are required of all regular 
students. For details see below. 



COURSES OF STUDY. 

Freshman Class — Five hours a week; study of grammar, the 
principles of special and general composition, with frequent brief 
papers illustrating the laws studied; study of American authors; 
Irving, Hawthorne, Holmes, Poe, Bryant, Longfellow. 

Swinton's English Grammar, Lockwood's Rhetoric, Kellogg & 
Reed's English Language. 

Sophomore Class — Three hours a week; study of style, analysis 
of selections of prose and poetry; frequent essays on historic and 
literary themes. 

G. R. Carpenter's Rhetoric, Genung's Rhetorical Analysis, Syle's 
From Milton to Tennyson. 

Junior Class — Three hours a week; lectures on the history of 
English literature, critical study of English classics, essays. 

Pancoast's History of English Literature; Pancoast's Standard 
English Poems, Macaulay, Carlyle, DeQuincey, etc. 

Senior Class — Two hours a. week, first term. Principles of Criti- 
cism, Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, Hamlet, etc., Dowden's Shakes- 
peare, etc. 

THEMES AND ORATIONS. 

Theory without practice is as fruitless in the study of English 
as in any other department of study. Practical work is indispen- 
sable to the successful teaching of English. 

Besides numerous brief papers illustrative of the subject matter 
of the text-books, set themes or orations are required of all stu- 
dents: For the freshman class, ten themes a year; ten for the 
sophomore; for the senior and junior classes, three orations each. 

DECLAMATION. 

The old practice of committing pieces to memory for "speaking" 
is cultivated as a means, both of training in the art of thinking 
on the feet, and of storing the mind with the diction of finished 
specimens of English style. 



70 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



The sophomore class is heard weekly throughout the year in 
sections of ten, once for an hour and a half in rehearsal, afterwards 
in the study-hall before the body of students. 

The senior and junior classes also deliver their orations in public. 

PHILOSOPHY AND POLITICAL ECONOMY. 









The senior class pursues the study of intellectual sci- 
ence, twice a week, through the year; and political econ- 
omy twice a week, during the last two terms. The in- 
struction in this department is hy lectures in combina- 
tion with text-books. 

Intellectual Science — Psychology defined. Value in relation to 
moral culture, education and Natural Sciences. The relation of 
the soul to matter. The arguments of the Materialist. Counter 
arguments. The Faculties of the Soul. The nature of Consciousness. 
Sense Perception. Fancy. Imagination. Nature of Conceptions. 
Language. Judgment. Reasoning. Deduction. Induction, etc. 
Porter's Intellectual Science. 

Political Economy — Value; production of wealth; land; labor; 
capital; division of labor; distribution of wealth; wages; trades- 
union; tariff; education, etc. Lectures by Professor. Ely's Outlines 
of Economics. 

A Post-graduate course has also been established in English. 
The following courses have been given: 

(1) Shakespeare— Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, Merchant of Venice, 
As You Like It, Henry IV., Part I., Richard III., King John. 

(2) Dryden— Poetical Works (Christie); Essay on Dramatic 
Poesy (Thomas Arnold); Essay on Satire, etc., (Yonge); Salis- 
bury's Life of Dryden. 

Pope— Poetical Works (Ward); Satires (Pattison); Stephen's 

Life of Pope, Gosse's From Shakespeare to Pope and 18th Century 
Literature. 

(3) English Literature of the Eighteenth Century: Addison Pope, 
Gray, Goldsmith, Burns, Cowper, Burke. 

(4) American Literature: Longfellow, Lowell, Poe. 

(5) The Rise and Development of the English Essay: Bacon, 
Addison, Steele, Swift, Johnson, Goldsmith, Macaulay, DeQuincey, 
Lamb, Carlyle. 

(6) Milton— Poetical Works (Masson); Life, Patisson, Brooke. 



—— — "■wri!" ^— — - 



■^^— 












1' **■ 


■ * > * 


■ ' 


[i** 




* 

hi ^,}--ir- ■ 


[ 






i 

i I 


1 »"■ • -"•"" 








~~ -^4'-^ 


p- : - ' 


~ ^ 




i 



- Kit -..***-■» • 



CHEMICAL LABORATORY (INTERIOR) 



J 



Alabama Polytechnic Ixstitctk. 



71 



CHEMISTRY. 

PROFESSOR ROSS. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR HARE 
INSTRUCTOR PHELPS. 



Instruction in this department embraces — 

1. A course of lectures in general chemistry. 

2. A course of lectures in industrial and engineer- 
ing chemistry. 

3. A course of lectures in organic chemistry. 

4. A course of lectures in metallurgy. 

5. A course of lectures in agricultural chemistry. 
(>. Systematic laboratory work in connection with 

each course of lectures, for the practice of chemical an- 
alysis and chemical research. 

1. Course* in general ehenjistry: This consists of a 
series of lectures (three per week) extending through- 
out the entire session, and includes a discussion of the 
fundamental principles of chemical philosophy in con- 
nection with the history, preparation, properties and 
compounds of the metallic and non-metallic elements, 
with the main facts and principles of organic chemistry. 
In this course the more common applications of chem- 
istry to the arts and manufactures are discussed. The 
apparatus used for experimental illustration is exten- 
sive, containing the newest and approved improvements 
necessary for presenting the subject in the most at- 
tractive and instructive form. 

KEFEKENCE BOOKS. 

Roscoe & Schorlemmer, Fownes, Prankland, Remsen, Cooke's 
Chemical Philosophy, Chemical Journals. 



11 






n 



72 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 









2. Lectures in industrial chemistry (three per week) 
extend throughout the session, and include a discus- 
sion in detail of the processes and chemical principles 
involved in the most important applications of chem- 
istry in the arte and manufactures to the preparation 
of materials for food and drink, for clothing, shelter, 
illumination, cleansing, purifying, writing, printing, 
etc. 

These lectures are amply illustrated by means of 
suitable 4 specimens of raw materials and manufactured 
products, together with models and diagrams. 

A course of lectures (two hours per week) on engi- 
neering chemistry is given during the last half of the 
senior j r ear, especial attention being given to the study 
of the construction and equipment of chemical plants 
devoted to the manufacture of the more important 
chemical products. The study of textile chemistry will 
also be included in this series of lectures. 

Excursions to various chemical and metallurgical 
plants during the course of the year will aid in familiar- 
izing the student with the practical details of the ope- 
rations of the leading industries. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Thorp's Industrial Chemistry, Wagner's Chemical Technology; 
Muspratt's Chemistry as applied to Arts and Manufacturing, Ure's 
Dictionary, Watts's Dictionary, Richardson and Watts's Chemical 
Technology, Sadtler's Industrial Organic Chemistry. 

3. Course in organic chemistry: Instruction in 
this subject embraces lectures and recitations (two 
hours per week ) throughout the junior year, upon the 
leading facts and principles of the chemistry of the car- 
Jion compounds, and includes a study of the methods of 
preparation of the more important compounds, their 
properties, and their structural and stereo-chemical re^ 
lations. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



73 



TEXT AND REFERENCE BOOKS. 



Remsen's Organic Chemistry, Richter's Organic Chemistry, 
Gatterman's Practical Methods of Organic Chemistry. 

4. Course in metallurgy : This consists of lectures 
and recitations (two per week, during the first half of 
the senior year) upon the more important metals, such 
as iron and steel, copper, lead, tin, silver, gold, mercury, 
zinc, etc. It includes a discussion of the physical and 
chemical properties of the metals and their alloys, the 
ores and their treatment, and the processes by which the 
metals are obtained from the ores, with chemical re- 
actions involved. 

5. Course in agricultural chemistry : This consists 
of lectures on chemistry in its application to agriculture 
(two per week, during second and third terms), and 
includes a thorough discussion of the origin, composi- 
tion and classification of soils, the composition and 
growth of plants, the sources of plant food and how ob- 
tained, the improvement of soils, the manufacture and 
use of fertilizers, the chemical principles involved in 
the rotation of crops, the feeding of live stock, and the 
various operations carried on by the intelligent and suc- 
cessful agriculturist. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Johnson's How Crops Grow, and How Crops Feed, Lupton's Ele- 
mentary Principles of Scientific Agriculture, Johnson's and Cam- 
eron's Elements of Agricultural Chemistry, Storer's Agriculture in 
Relation to Chemistry, scientific journals, reports of the United 
States Department of Agriculture, and the bulletins and reports of 
the various home and foreign agricultural departments and sta- 
tions. 

6. The course of systematic laboratory work: This 
course of practical work in the laboratory is carried on 
in connection with each course of lectures. In the jun- 








74 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

ior year the work embraced the practical operations of 
chemical synthesis and analysis and includes the prep- 
aration of the non-metallic elements and their most im- 
portant compound*, in addition to a systematic study of 
the metals and their compounds, their separation and 
identification. In the senior year students pursue work 
in quantitative analysis, including analysis of fertiliz- 
ers, soils, coals, ores, iron and steel, sugars and sugar 
products, feed stuffs, mineral waters, fluxes, slags, cin- 
ders, furnace gases, etc., the courses of work being 
varied somewhat to suit the individual object of the stu- 
dent. 

In the course in Pharmacy, instruction in Toxicology 
and Toxical Analysis is given during the last term of the 
senior year. 

All students during the sophomore year are required 
to take two hours per week of practical laboratory work, 
instruction being given in the simplest methods of 
chemical manipulation. 

The laboratories, which are open from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m., during 
six days in the week, are amply supplied with everything necessary 
for instruction in chemical manipulation in qualitative and quan- 
titative analysis, and in the methods of prosecuting chemical re- 
search. Unusual facilities are offered to students who wish to 
devote their time to the special study of practical chemistry. 

Each student on entering the chemical laboratory is furnished 
with a work table, a set of re-agent bottles and the common re- 
agents and apparatus used in qualitative or quantitative analysis. 

At the close of the session he will be credited with such articles 
as may be .returned in good order; the value of those which have 
been injured or destroyed will be deducted from his contingent fee. 

t 

In addition to the laboratory work above described it 
is designed to give a short course of laboratory work 
in industrial chemistry, in which the student will ap- 
ply upon a small scale the principles involved in the pro- 
cesses of some of the more important chemical industries. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



75 



Text-Books. 

In qualitative analysis — Jones, Sellers, Fresenius, Plattner. 

In quantitative analysis — Fresenius, Cairns, Sutton, Rose, Blair's 
Analysis of Iron and Steel, Bunsen, Rickett's Notes on Assaying, 
Mitchell's Manual of Practical Assaying, Stillman's Engineering 
Chemistry, Lord's Metallurgical Analysis. 

In agricultural chemical analysis — Official methods of the Asso- 
ciation of Agricultural Chemists, Wiley's Principles and Practice 
of Agricultural Analysis. 

CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

[For description of the building see page 16.] 
The chemical apparatus recently purchased for the laboratory 
consists of a full supply of the most approved instruments for prac- 
tical work and investigation. The building is supplied with water 
and gas and every appliance required to meet the demands of mod- 
ern scientific instruction and research. In addition to the apparatus 
usually supplied to first-class laboratories, there have been im- 
ported a new and improved Schmidt and Hensch's polariscope, eight 
short-arm balances of latest pattern, Bunsen spectroscope, Abbe 
refractometer and other instruments for delicate and accurate work. 



PHYSICS. 

PROFESSOR SOUTHALL. 

The complete course of Physics extends over four 
years, and is designed to give, as far as possible, an 
adequate and correct idea of the methods of Physical 
Science, and to lay the foundation for subsequent more 
advanced work if (as must often be the case, especially 
in an institution such as this) the student desires Jo 
pursue the subject further or intends to engage m any 
of the great engineering professions of which Phjwcs 
is so important a basis. The lectures are illustrated by 
experiment®; the students are required to work numer- 
ous problems and exercises; recitations are held each 
week. 



76 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 
















FRESHMAN COURSE. 

This course is very elementary, and continues only 
during the first and second terms. The object in view 
is to make the student familiar with the fundamental 
principles of Physics. The class meets three times a 
week. (The text-book will be announced later.) 

SOPHOMORE COURSE. 

This is a laboratory course, and deemed especially 
important' for students of engineering, and of great ad- 
vantage to such as intend to pursue the subsequent 
higher work in this department. The laboratory exer- 
cises are carefully selected, being designed to illustrate 
the fundamental methods and principles of Physics, 
and, although the work is necessarily more or less ele- 
mentary, at the same time such accuracy and precision 
as the conditions admit of are insisted upon, so that the 
student is expected to acquire a fairly correct idea of 
modern experimental investigation. The exercises con- 
sist of the fundamental measurements of Length, Mass. 
Density, moduluses of Elasticity, pendulum experiments^ 
etc., together with a few more advanced experiments in 
connection with the simpler properties of Liquids and 
Gases, and the general phenomena of Heat and Sound. 
The student is required to write a careful report of each 
experiment, entering the results of observation in tabu- 
lar form, and plotting a curve wherever practicable; 
also describing the object, apparatus, and method, and 
noting sources of errors, etc. Great stress is laid upon 
this requirement, and reports are not accepted unless 
they indicate that the student has done his best in every 
way. Four hours per week throughout entire year. 
(Text-book will be announced later.) 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



JUNIOR COURSE. 



77 



Lectures and recitations three hours a week through- 
out entire session. This is a more advanced course in 
o-eneral physics required of all candidates for a degree. 
The only preparation needed is a good working knowl- 
edge of mathematics through plane trigonometry. The 
course includes a series of illustrated lectures on the 
principles of Dynamics, as applied to Solids, liquids, and 
Oases, Sound, and Heat, in the order named. Written 
exercises are required each week. (Text-hook to be an- 
nounced later. ) 

SENIOR COURSE. 

Lectures and recitations two hours a week through- 
out the entire session. This course, although more ad- 
vanced than the Junior course, and occasionally em- 
ploying the higher Mathematics, is a continuation of 
the work of the previous year. It might be called a 
course in Elementary Mathematical Physics, and the 
subjects, varying from year to year, that are treated in 
the lectures are such branches of Physics as Kinematics 
and Dynamics, Thermodynamics, Electricity, and Mag- 
netism, Geometrical and Physical Optics, etc. The stu- 
dent is encouraged to solve difficulties for himself, and 
to read the standard treatises and original memoirs OB 
the various topics that come under discussion. 

The last term of the session will generally be devoted 
to a brief course of lectures in Descriptive Astronomy. 

The text-books in this class vary with the changing 
subjects, and will be announced by the professor each 
year. 

GRADUATE COURSE. 

This course will be designed to meet the needs of the 
students who take it. It will include both heore .ea 
and experimental work in more advanced Mathemafccal 
Physics, or in Analytical Mechanics. 








78 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

HISTORY AND LATIN. 

PROFESSOR PETRIE. 

ASSISTANT BOYD. 

; - ' HISTORY. 

In this department the aim is not so much to memo- 
rize facts as to understand them. Strong emphasis is 
laid on the fart that history is not a succession of iso- 
lated facts, hut a progressive whole, each 6vent being 
at once the cause and the effect of other events. The 
students are taught to investigate the growth of ideas 
and institutions, the rise and progress of great historical 
movements and the reciprocal influences of men and cir- 
cumstances. Frequent use is made of diagrams,, photo- 
graphs, charts and maps, with which the department is 
well equipped, Instruction is given by text-books, lec- 
tures and class discussion, but a constant effort is made 
to stimulate to wider reading and research in the 
library. 

The following courses are given : 

Freshman Class— History of the United States, Ala- 
bama, and England. 

Text-books: Hart's "Formation of the Union," Wil- 
son's "Division and Reunion," Brown's "History of 
Alabama, " Montgomery's "History of England." 

Sophomore Class— Political and Social History of 
Europe, Ancient, Mediaeval and Modern. The work is 
conducted partly by lectures, partly by text-book. 
Every week problems will be assigned for research. 

Text-book : Myers's General History. 

HISTORICAL LABORATORY. 

In the junior and senior classes opportunity 'far spe- 
cial work in United States history is given to those stu- 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



79 



dents of the General Course who elect it as laboratory 
work, and to any others who are properly qualified. 
The chief object kept in view is training in historical 
research and in the formation of independent, but care- 
ful opinions based on the original sources of informa- 
tion, as well as on the standard authorities. Emphasis 
is laid on the importance of securing proper material 
for investigation, and every incentive is given to the 
collection and use of new documents, papers and letters 
illustrative of Southern, and especially of Alabama, his- 
tory. 

The method of work is as follows: Informal lectures are given 
on important and suggestive points. After each lecture topics con- 
nected with it are assigned to the students with an outline of the 
points to be investigated. They report their results to the class 
and a discussion follows. The final results are collected by each 
student according to his own judgment in his note-book, which is 
then passed in to the professor for correction and suggestion. 

The following courses in laboratory work will be of- 
fered during the session of 1902-03 : 

Junior Class— The motive for American colonization ; 
colonial governments; causes of the Revolution ; Declara- 
tion of Independence; treaty of peace; Confederation; 
Ordinance of 1787 ; Constitution. 

Text-books: Frothingham's "Rise of the Republic," 
Lecky's "American Revolution/' Fiske's "Critical Per- 
iod." 

Senior Class— The rise of parties ; War of 1812 ; Mon- 
roe Doctrine; Missouri Compromise; Nullification; 
Annexation of Texas; Compromise of 1850; Kansas 
Struggle; Dred Scott Decision; Secession. 

Text-books: Moore's "American Congress," Burgess's 
"Middle Period." 






T 



\ 






* 






80 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



GRADUATE STUDENTS. 



Graduate students are expected to take part in the junior and 
senior discussions and in addition will meet with the professor 
for conference in regard to their work. Those who take history as 
their major subject are expected to devote a large part of their 
time to original research upon some topic on which they can con- 
sult the original sources of information. They are also required 
to pursue a prescribed course of reading as indicated below. 

Text-Books. 

Rhodes's "History of the United States from the Compromise of 
1850," Vols. 1 and 2; Stephens's "Constitutional View of the War Be- 
tween the States"; Lives of Calhoun, Clay and Jackson; special read- 
ing in connection with the research. 

PRIZES. 

The Eufaula Chapter of the Daughters of the Ameri- 
can Revolution have offered a gold medal for the best 
original historical research done during the session of 
1901-02 by any young woman matriculated in college. 

The Colonial Dames in Alabama have donated fifty 
dollars toward the expenses during the session of 
1902-03 of the }'oung man matriculated in college who 
submits the best research on a specified colonial topic. 

LATIN. 

The objects kept in view in this department are: An 
accurate knowledge of the forms and isyntax; a famil- 
iarity with Latin Words, their etymology and their Eng- 
lish derivatives; an appreciation of Latin literature and 
an intelligent conception of Roman history and civiliza- 
tion, both in themselves and in their effect on the mod- 
ern world. 

A systematic course of instruction is given in the forms and 
syntax. These are taught both deductively from a grammar and 
inductively from the text read. Translation is constantly practiced, 
sometimes at sight, sometimes after being assigned for preparation. 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



81 



English passages based on the author read or illustrative of special 
constructions are put in Latin, both, orally and in writing. Great 
emphasis is laid on the etymology of the words in the text read. 

In connection with every author studied in class a course of 
reading in English is prescribed descriptive of his life, work and 
times. The historical setting and the literary value of his writings 
are carefully discussed and frequent comparisons are made with 
modern authors. 

For the benefit of students who do not study the Latin language 
a series of popular lectures will be given upon the great Latin 
writers. Especial emphasis is laid on proficiency in writing Latin 
exercises and in translating Latin prose at sight. 

Text-Books. 

Freshman Class— Allen & Greenough's Grammar, Exercises, 
Nepos, Sallust or equivalent. 

Sophomore Class— Cicero, Allen & Greenough's Grammar, Ben- 
nett's Latin Composition. 

Junior Class.— Virgil, Livy, Allen and Greenough's Grammar, Ex- 
ercises, Guerber's Mythology, Botsford's "History of Rome." 

Senior Class— Horace, Tacitus, Wilkins's Latin Literature, Exer- 
cises, Preston and Dodge's "Private Life of the Romans." 









MODERN LANGUAGES. 

PROFESSOR WIATT. 

The chief aim in this department is to give the stu- 
dent a thorough and accurate knowledge of the ele- 
mentary principles of the subjects taught, and to enable 
him to read with facility the ordinary French and Ger- 
man at sight. To train the ear, acquire a correct pro- 
nunciation and some facility in speaking, all recitations 
are supplemented, as far as practicable, by oral exer- 
cises in the languages themselves. 

The following regular courses are given in I reach and 

(TP'TmfiTi * 

French— Fir st Year: Three recitations a week Dur- 
ing this year the principal object is to acquire a knowl- 



6 




82 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 










edge of the elements of grammar and a correct pronun- 
ciation, together with a facility in translating ordinary 
French. Reading is begun at an early stage, and the 
principles of grammar are illustrated and impressed 
by frequent exercises in rendering English into French. 

Second Year: Three recitations a week. During this 
year almost the same line of work is pursued as that 
begun the previous year. More difficult and varied 
French is read, and instruction, is given upon the laws 
of grammar, the construction of the language, and the 
history of the literature. Special attention is given to 
sight translation. 

German— Two Years: Three recitations a week the 
first year, three a week the second year. In this course 
*the aim and the methods are similar to those in French. 

The students in this department will meet the profes- 
sor twice a week, from 4 to 5 p. in. during the first term, 
and the third term, for exercises in conversation in 
French and German. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

Fhencii— First Year: Edgren's Grammar and Locard's Supple- 
mentary Exercises. Super's Reader. 

Second Year: Feuillet's Le Roman d'un Jeune Homme Pauvre, 

Racine's Esther, Corneille's Le Menteur, Moliere's Le Bourgeois 

Gentilhomme, selected plays, Whitney's Grammar, original exer- 
cises. 

German— Fim Year: Joynes-Meissner's Grammar and Reader. 
Second Year: Der Bibliothekar, Wilhelm Tell, Whitney's Gram- 
mar and Exercises, selected plays, original exercises. 

GRADUATE COURSE. 

This course is offered for the benefit of those students 
who wish to pursue the study of these subjects beyond 
the scope to which a two-year course necessarily limits 
them. Here, in addition to the authors studied in the 
lecture room, a wide and extensive reading of authors 
and literature is prescribed. 





ELECTRICAL BUILDING. 



^^ 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute, S3 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

PROFESSOR DUNSTAN. 

ASSISTANT SLOAN. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term : Four hours per week are devoted to the 
study of the principles of electricity and magnetism, 
with special reference to their industrial applications. 
The subject of electrical measurements is also treated 
in detail. 

Second Term: Incandescent lighting, four hours per 

week. 

Third Term : Are lighting and wiring, four hours per 

week. 

Text-Books. 

S. P. Thompson's Electricity; Crocker's Electric Lighting, and 
Cushing's Standard Wiring. 

Instruction is given by lectures and recitations. 

LABORATORY WORK. 

Four hours per week are devoted to work in the labo- 
ratory. This includes management of batteries, electri- 
cal measurements, adjustments and testing of are lamps, 
and a considerable amount of wiring and some electrical 

construction. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term: Dynamo electric machinery, live hours 
per week. 
Second Term: Alternating currents and alternating 

current machinery. 

Third Term: Polyphase machinery and power trans- 
mission, five hours per week. 

Text-Books. 

Dynamo Electric Machinery, Sheldon. Alternating Currents, 
Franklin and Williamson, Standard Polyphase Apparatus, Oudin. 



84 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 












LABORATORY WORK. 

Six hours per week during the entire senior year are 
devoted to practical work in the dynamo laboratory. 
The work includes the study and testing of various types 
of dynamos and motors, the determination of various 
constants, dynamo and motor efficiencies, transformer 
testing, and the general management and installation of 
electrical machinery. 

ELECTRICAL DESIGNING. 

During the first term each senior student is required 
to design and prepare the necessary drawings for the 
construction of a direct current dynamo or motor, and 
during the third term the design of an alternator is com- 
pleted. 

Encouragement is offered to advanced students for conducting 
original investigations, and opportunity is taken to stimulate a 
spirit of scientific inquiry. Courses of reading are suggested to such 
students in connection with their experimental work. 






Post Graduate Course. To graduate students more 
advanced courses of instruction in polyphase machinery 
and power transmission are offered, the courses being 
varied from year to year to suit the needs of those taking 
them. 

EQUIPMENT. 

The laboratory is well supplied with batteries, storage and pri- 
mary, telephones, plating apparatus and similar minor apparatus. 
Among the instruments of precision may be noted Kelvin ampere 
• balances, graded current and potential galvanometers, alternating 
and direct current ammeters and voltmeters of various ranges, 
from Weston, Queen, Jewell, Hartman & Braun, Despretz, Fein, 
General Electric Company and other domestic and foreign makers. 
There are also direct reading and recording watt meters, dynampm- 
eters reading from .0001 ampere to 100 amperes, a number of re- 
sistance boxes and bridges, condensers, keys, galvanometers of vari- 
ous types, magnetic testing apparatus, portable and fixed, pho- 




Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



85 




_E_ 



PLkN 



•OF- 







•J- 









ELECTR1CNL LKBQRNTORV 
KLK.PQLV.IN5T. 

SCKLEDF FEET 



tS.V.m tH. 



¥ 



H 






U 







R 



=C 







II 



Q.J 



I ; 



8 



«tf 



fl 



<] 



B 



f J 



fl 



fl 






INDEX TD PLKN 

B-\AtST\NGWQUSE CNGMt 

C-UH50N lTmW\0-3K-W 

•D- .. . -ll-KW 

E- WtSTDN . - 

F-STKR 

G-rot(\\- M-TtRNKTOR 

H- MQTOR-GENERKTDR5 

1-T-H. DVVIN^O 

1- . KRC . 

K- \NDUCT\QN MDTQR 

V.-UOO-VOUT GCNERVTQR 

M-BRU5H KRGBX'NKMO 

N-aUEXN TTCNMAn 

o-TwaPv^sc M-T. 

P-GX.tNUCTlON MOTOR 
U-5TM»IXY .. 
R-CROCKOWHUUR - 
5-5W\TCH-BQKRD 
T-UMP 

U-\H5TRUNCMT CK«iC5 
V- BRUSH RKUV.MOR 
V»-*QR"Vl TKBLl 
X-T-H. TttSULNTQR 
Z-SHOVk CK515 



» 















3= 


1 

m 














86 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 






tometers, high potential testing apparatus, portable testing set, 
cradle dynamometer, a special instrument for comparing induct- 
ances, self and mutual, and capacities. 

This department, being provided with Lord Kelvin's standard 
electrical instruments for exact measurements, will calibrate free 
of expense, any ammeter or voltmeter that may be sent to the col- 
lege. 

In the dynamo room the following are installed: One Weston 
150 volt, 20 ampere dynamo, with rheostat; one Brush 6 arc light 
dynamo, with regulator and six lamps; one Ideal 5 kilo-watt three 
phase alternator; one Thompson-Houston 9 arc light dynamo with 
lamps; one Edison compound wound 12 kilo- watt generator; a 
Thompson-Houston 110 volt, 75 ampere generator; two street car 
motors used as either direct or alternating current .generators or 
motors; two polyphase induction motors; one General Electric 
5 horse-power induction motor, mounted on cradle dynamometer; 
General Electric 20 horse-power motor; and Stanley induction motor 
with condensers; one Fort Wayne 1 horse-power alternating cur- 
rent motor; Edison %% kilo-watt generator; a Crocker-Wheeler 
1 horse-power motor and rheostat and one bi-phase alternator, and 
500 volt generator, made by special students, furnish current to 
laboratory and light up the different buildings. A lamp board with 
a capacity of 210 lamps has been installed and is used for testing 
purposes. 

The dynamos occupy a separate brick building 50x32 feet, and 
are operated by a 60 horse-power Harrisburg Standard engine, and 
a 25 horse-power Atlas engine. 

An electric motor, made by students, supplied with current from 
a generator at a distance of 3,000 feet, operates a gin, gin press, 
ensilage cutter and feed cutter at the experiment station farm. 
This motor not only, subserves a useful purpose in the operation 
of these machines, but is an excellent illustration of the electric 
transmission of power. 





\ 



WOOD ROOM 



_ 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 



87 



MECHANICAL ENGINEEUING AND MECHANIC 

ARTS. 

PROFESSOR WILMORB. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR c'uKNsn \\v, 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR TRAMMELL. 

ASSISTANT i'ROFESSOR Kl I. LAN. 

[NSTRUCTOR HILL. 
ASSISTANT WERNER. 

Tlic course in manual training covers three years, as 
follows: First year, wood- working — can>entrv and 
turning; second year, pattern making ami foundry and 
forge work — molding, casting and smithing; third year, 
machine shop — chipping and filing and machine work in 
metals. 

This course is obligatory upon the students of the 
.two lower classes. For satisfactory reasons a student 
mav be excused from this laboratory work by the Fae- 
ultv. 

The full work of each class is six hours per wee 1 :, in 
three exercises of two hours each 

The power for running the apparatus in this department is de- 
rived from a 25 horse-power Harris-Corliss automatic engine., A 
steam pump and a heater for the feed-water form a part of the 
steam apparatus. For the steam plant a substantial brick boiler- 
house and chimney have been erected, and a 100 horse-power Heine 
boiler installed. 

The equipment for the wood-working shops comprises the follow- 
ing: 30 wood-working benches, each with complete set of car- 
penter's tools; 24 turning lathes 10-inch swing each with complete 
set of tools; 1 double circular saw; 1 band saw; 1 board-planing 
machine; 1 jointer; 1 pattern-maker's lathe 16-inch swing; 1 36-Inch 
grindstone. The tool room is supplied with a variety of extra hand 
tools for special work and in addition to the regular carpenters' 
tools in the benches each student is supplied with a set of chisels 



88 



Alap.ama Polytechnic Institute. 



ami plane irons with a locker to keep them in and is held respon- 
sible for their care and condition. 

The equipment for the foundry consists of molding benches for 
18 students, each supplied with a complete set of molder's tools; a 
23-inch Colliau cupola, with all modern improvements, capable of 
melting 2.000 pounds of iron per hour; a brass furnace in which can 
be melted 100 pounds of brass at a heat, with a set of crucible tongs, 
etc. Also a full supply of ladles, large and small molding flasks, a 
foundry crane, special tools, etc. 

The forge shop equipment consists of 24 down draft forges of 
new pattern each with a set of smith's tools, anvils, etc. The blast 
for all the forges is supplied with a No. 3 Sturtevant steel pressure 
blower (which also furnishes blast for the foundry cupola), and a 
GO-inch underground exhaust blower draws the smoke from the 
fires into the smoke flues and forces it out through the chimney. 

The machine department occupies a brick building 30x100 feet and 
is equipped with eight 14-inch screw cutting engine lathes with 
six-foot bed; 2 engine lathes. 16-inch swing (one with taper at- 
tachment); 1 engine lathe, 18-inch swing, with compound rest and 
taper attachment; 1 speed-lathe, 10-inch swing; 1 20-inch drill press 
(power feed); 1 10-inch sensitive drill; 1 15-inch shaper; 1 22-inch 
x22-inchx5 foot planer; 1 2G-inchx26-inchxG foot iron planer; 1 uni-' 
versal milling machine; 1 corundum tool grinder (14-inch wheel); 
1 bench grinder; 1 post drill press; 1 Brown and Sharpe universal 
grinding machine; 1 universal, cutter and reamer grinder; 1 power 
hack saw. A part of the room is set apart for vise work, chipping 
and filing; and benches for twelve students are provided, each with 
vise and set of files, chisels, hammers, etc. In the tool room is to be 
found a good supply of machinists' tools for general shop use. 
such as lathe and drill chucks, drills, reamers, taps, dies, gauges, 
files, cutting and measuring tools, and special appliances for 
machine work, with machine for grinding twist drills. 

Tli<> nature of the work in eac) departmeiil is as fol- 
lows: 

Fiust Yeak. 

I. A course in carpentry or hand work covering the first two 
terms. The lessons include instruction in the nature and use of 
tools, instruction and practice in shop drawing, elementary work' 
with plane, saw, chisel, different kinds of joints, timber splices, 



■■ 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



89 



cross joints, mortise and tenon, mitre and frame work, dovetail 
work, comprising different kinds of joints used in cabinet making, 
light cabinet work, examples in building, framing, roof-trusses, etc. 
II. A course in turning, extending through the third term. The 
lessons comprise nature and use of lathe and tools, plain straight 
turning, caliper work to different diameters and lengths, simple and 
compound curves, screw plate and chuck work, hollow and spherical 
turning. 

Second Year. 

I. Course in forge work in iron and steel, occupying the first 
term. The lessons are arranged so that the students in making the 
series of objects, become familiar with the nature of the metals and 
the successive steps 'in working them by hand into simple and com- 
plex forms, as drawing, upsetting, bending, cutting, punching, weld- 
ing by various methods, tool-forging, tempering, hardening, etc. 

II. A course in pattern-making covering the second term. The 
work includes a variety of examples of whole and split patterns, 
core work, etc., giving the students familiarity with the use ol 
patterns for general molding. 

III. A course in molding and casting in iron and brass occupy- 
ing the third term. The work consists for the most part of small 
articles, such as light machine parts, but a sufficient variety of 
forms are introduced for the student to acquire a good general and 
practical knowledge of the usual methods ami appliances used in 
light foundry work. Most of the work is in green sand in two part 
flasks; core work is also given and some three part flask and son, 
dry sand work is introduced. 

The same patterns which have been previously made by students 
are used, besides special patterns for occasional larger or more 
complicated work. Instruction and practice is given in working 

the cupola. ' , . , , rt£S ,_ 

in connection with the second year work, a series of lectures i 
given on the metallurgy and working of the metals used In th« 
industr:alarts. cast and wrought iron, steel, brass, etc. 

TiiiKD Yeab. 

I. Course of chipping and tiling, covering the first term The 
iessons comprise work en cast and wrought iron; chlpp n B tol.ne 
on flat and curved surfaces, key-seating, etc.. "^ «4j£"££" 
line (straight and cu.-vcJ). surface filing and fimslung, fit.mg, 















88 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



and plane irons with a locker to keep them in and is held respon- 
sible for their care and condition. 

The equipment for the foundry consists of molding benches for 
18 students, each supplied with a complete set of molder's tools; a 
23-inch Colliau cupola, with all modern improvements, capable of 
melting 2,000 pounds of iron per hour; a brass furnace in which can 
be melted 100 pounds of brass at a heat, with a set of crucible tongs, 
etc. Also a full supply of ladles, large and small molding flasks, a 
foundry crane, special tools, etc. 

The forge shop equipment consists of 24 down draft forges of 
new pattern each with a set of smith's tools, anvils, etc. The blast 
for all the forges is supplied with a No. 3 Sturtevant steel pressure 
blower (which also furnishes blast for the foundry cupola), and a 
GO-inch underground exhaust blower draws the smoke from the 
fires into the smoke flues and forces it out through the chimney. 

The machine department occupies a brick building 30x100 feet and 
is equipped with eight 14-inch screw cutting engine lathes with 
six-foot bed; 2 engine lathes, 16-inch swing (one with taper at- 
tachment) ; 1 engine lathe, 18-inch swing, with compound rest and 
taper attachment; 1 speed-lathe, 10-ihch swing; 1 20-inch drill press 
(power feed); 1 10-inch sensitive drill; 1 15-inch shaper; 1 22-inch 
x22-inchx5 foot planer; 1 26-inchx26-inchx6 foot iron planer; 1 uni^ 
versal milling machine; 1 corundum tool grinder (14-inch wheel); 
1 bench grinder; 1 post drill press; 1 Brown and Sharpe universal 
grinding machine; 1 universal cutter and reamer grinder; 1 power 
hack saw. A part of the room is set apart for vise work, chipping 
and filing; and benches for twelve students are provided, each with 
vise and set of files, chisels, hammers, etc. In the tool room is to be 
found a good supply of machinists' tools for general shop use, 
such as lathe and drill chucks, drills, reamers, taps, dies, gauges, 
files, cutting and measuring tools, and special appliances for 
machine work, with machine for grinding twist drills. 



The nature of the work in eac) department is a* fol- 
lows : 

First Year. 

I. A course in carpentry or hand work covering the first two 
terms. The lessons include instruction in the nature and use of 
tools, instruction and practice in shop drawing, elementary work 
with plane, saw, chisel, different kinds of joints, timber splices, 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



89 



cross joints, mortise and tenon, mitre and frame work, dovetail 
work, comprising different kinds of joints used in cabinet making, 
light cabinet work, examples in building, framing, roof-trusses, etc. 
II. A course in turning, extending through the third term. The 
lessons comprise nature and use of lathe and tools, plain straight 
turning, caliper work to different diameters and lengths, simple and 
compound curves, screw plate and chuck work, hollow and spherical 
turning. 

Second Yeau. 

I. Course in forge work in iron and steel, occupying the first 
term. The lessons are arranged so tha f t the students in making the 
series of objects, become familiar with the nature of the metals and 
the successive steps in working them by hand into simple and com- 
plex forms, as drawing, upsetting, bending, cutting, punching, weld- 
ing by. various methods, tool-forging, tempering, hardening, etc. 

II. A course in pattern-making covering the second term. The 
work includes a variety of examples of whole and split patterns, 
core work, etc., giving the students familiarity with the use of 
patterns for general molding. 

III. A course in molding and casting in iron and brass occupy- 
ing the third term. The work consists for the most part of small 
articles, such as light machine parts, but a sufficient variety of 
forms are introduced for the student to acquire a good general and 
practical knowledge of the usual methods and appliances used in 
light foundry work. Most of the work is in green sand in two part 
flasks; core work is also given and some three part flask and some 
dry sand work is introduced. 

The same patterns which have been previously made by students 
are used, besides special patterns for occasional larger or more 
complicated work. Instruction and practice is given in working 

the cupola. 

In connection with the second year work, a series of lectures is 
given on the metallurgy and working of the metals used in the 
industrial arts, cast and wrought iron, steel, brass, etc. 

Third Year. 

I. Course of chipping and filing, covering the first term The 
lessons comprise work en cast and wrought iron; chipping to line 
on flat and curved surfaces, key-seating, etc., filing and finishing to 
line (straight and curved), surface filing and finishing, fitting, 

7 









* 




i 



90 Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

slotting, dovetail work, sawing, pin and screw filing, surface finish- 
ing with scraper, etc. 

II. Machine work occupying the remainder of the year. The 
work includes cast and wrought iron; steel and brass; turning to 
various diameters and lengths, taper turning, facing with chuck and 
face plate, drilling— both in lathe and drill press— reaming, boring, 
screw-cutting in lathe and with taps and dies, planing, slotting etc., 
with planer and shaper, milling various forms with the milling 
machine, including exercise in making taps, reamers, etc., fitting, 
grinding, polishing, etc. 

Lectures are also given during the year on various subjects con- 
nected with machine work in metals; such as forms, construction 
and use of the various machines, cutting tools, gearing, gauges, 
screw threads, etc. During the last term some piece of construc- 
tion work is given the classes. 

All of the work is done from blue prints and blackboard sketches. 
In the construction work the student is given a blue print and the 
material for a certain part. He is then encouraged to study the 
work and plan the best method of doing it. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 
JUNIOR YEAR. 

Elementary Mechanics. — Three hours a week for the 
first term are devoted to this subject. The fundamental 
laws underlying all mechanical science and the mechan- 
ics of liquids, gases and vapors are studied. 

Kinematics. — Three recitations per week during. the 
second and third terms are devoted to this subject. 

Under this head machines are analyzed and their elementary com- 
binations of mechanism studied. The communication of motion by 
gear-wheels, belts, cams, screws and link-work, the different ways 
of obtaining definite velocity ratios and definite changes of velocity, 
parallel motions and quick return motions as well as the design- 
ing of trains of mechanism for various purposes, together with the 
theoretical forms of teeth for gear wheels to transmit the motion 
through these trains, are investigated under this subject. 



p 

c 



QH 



5 «- 



Vl 









<0 . 



^qu QMke*-*>* 



K 

Q j Chi 
QC ft; >k 



o «a I « 

1 I J j, 



■ I — I s "i — 

xr 

«r 

o 
5 

i 

i 1 ° i 

o 

$ 



BS58"" 



rm * 



g£44 



X 






L 



2>._.a 



D= 



U _ 

I o s 



»€>« 





MACHINE j * 
TOOLS ! 


1 i 

OFFICE L 


CD 











y 



r 



— Wkr> 



y^ 



N 



S 4? 








^ 



ft 




\ 








i 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 



91 



Mechanical Drawing. — Fours hours a week during the 
year are devoted to drawing. During thp first part of 
the year instruction is given in the conventional meth- 
ods of representing standard materials, and in the de- 
sign of fastenings and machine parts. Later on scale 
drawings of simple machines are made from dimensioned 
sketches which each student makes for himself from the 
actual machine. Free hand lettering, tracing, and blue- 
printing receive attention, and all the instruction is in- 
tended to familiarize the student with modern drawing 
office methods. 

Text-Books. 
Wood's Elementary Mechanics, Barr's Kinematics of Machinery. 



SENIOR YEAR. 

Mechanical Engineering of Power Plants.— The first 
term, five hours per week, is given to the study of the 
practical applications of steam machinery. It is be- 
lieved that a thorough knowledge of the apparatus in 
actual practical use is the best preparation a student can 
have for the study of the theory, and to that end, the dif- 
ferent types of engines, boilers, pumps, condensers, and 
other auxiliary apparatus are taken up and studied in 
detail, and the advantages and disadvantages of each 
discussed. Extensive files of manufacturers' catalogues 
are kept and the technical papers and magazines in the 
library are freely used in order to keep in touch with the 
latest and best practice in engineering work. 

Steam Engine.— The second term five hours per week 
will be given to the study of the theory and efficiency of 
the steam engine, with discussions of the effects of con- 
densation in cylinder, action of fly wheels, effect of jack- 
eting, etc. Simple and compound engines, various valves 



! 



92 



Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 









and cut-off motions, and the principal types of modern 
engines are studied. Special attention is given to the 
steam engine indicator. 

Applied Mechanics. — The third term, four hours per 
week is given to work in this subject. Applications of 
the mechanical principles previously learned, are made 
to the